#1
So, my peavey bass has BAD intonation. I have the saddle on the E string back about as far as it will go, and it's still sharp. So do I need lighter strings? Or is there something else I can do?
Last edited by a.anderson1996 at Aug 28, 2010,
#2
yeah a lot of times it's the string gauge.

you can try adjusting the relief too, (if it could use it)

1. measure the neck relief.
the how to is in the green link in my sig, first post.

2. did you change from factory gauge strings?
Jenneh

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#3
yeah i went lighter than the factory strings and the only way to go lighter would be super slinkys...then i have no other options.
#4
Quote by a.anderson1996
yeah i went lighter than the factory strings and the only way to go lighter would be super slinkys...then i have no other options.



first i would check the relief, adjust if i could, and see if you can get more room that way.

if that didnt work, id return to factory gauge strings on the guitar.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

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#5
I once had to move the bridge back a few mm on an Ibanez because I could never get the intonation right on the top string. New strings should intonate ok regardless of gauge, if they don't then the bridge is in the wrong spot.

PS: I am assuming you've set the neck up properly and don't have a 1/4" action.
Gilchrist custom
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Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
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Atomic Amplifire
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Cathbard Amplification
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Last edited by Cathbard at Aug 29, 2010,
#6
see that's really what we don't know, everything.

how old the strings are,
the relief, action and if the nut cuts have been dug into.

i'm sure, i'd start with factory gauge, especially on old strings,
check the relief, set the action, and the intonation should be much better...

unless it never was from day one.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#7
Yeah, old strings always go out of intonation, if you don't have a uniform density along the string it can't intonate properly. As soon as my strings start to lose intonation they go into the bin.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#8
What model Peavey bass is it? That way I'll know what bridge design it is.

Your best bet is to string your bass with taper core strings. DR, Carvin and a number of others make them. They are extremely thin at the point where the bridge saddle contacts the string. It is much easier to set the intonation with taper core strings; particularly if your bridge saddles don't have a lot of room to travel.

Something I have discovered but cannot explain is that sometimes when you set the intonation with taper core strings after striking out with regular strings, if you then re-string the bass with regular strings, the intonation is spot on. I can't account for it, but I own a number of basses that have short-travel bridges and this seems to work with most of them.

At any rate, a set of taper core strings will solve your problem.
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