#1
I am changing some hardware on my guitar and was wondering,what are the advantages to a bone nut instead of the cheap synthetic one that is currently on it?
Thanks for any help in advance
#4
Some say it improves your tone, although I'm not sure in what way. I would guess it's a brighter, clearer tone.

Personally I would go for a graph-tech nut for better tuning stability.
#5
It doesn't get pregnant?
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#7
Bone gives a very bright tone and is very hard; it's hard to cut the string slots properly in a bone nut and if you mess them up even slightly then the nut is wasted, but if you get it right the strings will never bind, it won't wear down and it'll sustain for days (at least, as much as the nut effects sustain).
Corian, as well as other tough, synthetic materials, sound, operate and feel much like bone nuts but they are easier to cut and cheaper. Usually, when you see a modern guitar being advertised as having a bone nut, it is actually a synthetic bone nut (especially likely on any guitar that is priced less than a grand).

Graphite or graphite & teflon nuts don't have to be cut so cleanly, so they're cheaper to produce and easier to alter for different string gauges, plus they help tuning stability a great deal. They can wear down over time though if you use them with thick strings and a vibrato bridge and if you have a hard tail bridge then the benefits of a graphite/graphite & teflon nut are limited. Graphite and graphite & teflon nuts both give a slightly warmer tone than bone or synthetic bone and it's not as muted as a cheap plastic nut.
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#8
Quote by MrFlibble
Bone gives a very bright tone and is very hard; it's hard to cut the string slots properly in a bone nut and if you mess them up even slightly then the nut is wasted, but if you get it right the strings will never bind, it won't wear down and it'll sustain for days (at least, as much as the nut effects sustain).
Corian, as well as other tough, synthetic materials, sound, operate and feel much like bone nuts but they are easier to cut and cheaper. Usually, when you see a modern guitar being advertised as having a bone nut, it is actually a synthetic bone nut (especially likely on any guitar that is priced less than a grand).

That is very much true. Take it from experience.
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#9
Different nuts will have a noticeable affect on tone.... but only when you're playing open chords. Otherwise there isn't any reason to swap a nut for tonal benefits. If you're fretting a string it vibrates from between the bridge and the fret, the nut isn't a factor in it's vibrating length anymore.


EDIT: +1 on Flibble's bone cutting description, cutting bone nuts is miserable, hard on tool edges and it stinks like no other
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Last edited by Flux'D at Aug 29, 2010,