#1
So I just started learning scales yesterday, more specificly, the minor pentatonic scales. I was looking up the five positions and had a question. With positions where the root note isnt the first note of that shape on the low e string, do you start the scale where the root note is, or do you start with the first note on the low e string even though it isn't the root note? Let me know if im not being specific enough, thanks.
#2
Quote by butterfingers30
So I just started learning scales yesterday, more specificly, the minor pentatonic scales. I was looking up the five positions and had a question. With positions where the root note isnt the first note of that shape on the low e string, do you start the scale where the root note is, or do you start with the first note on the low e string even though it isn't the root note? Let me know if im not being specific enough, thanks.



Well when you're soloing you can start on whatever note you want, but the scale starts with the tonic.

If you're just starting with scales, I would practice by starting on the tonic, then work your way to the highest note in the pattern..... then down to the lowest note in the pattern, then back up and end on the tonic again. You may want to pause on the tonics as you play through to get used to where they are and to train yourself to hear them as the tonic.

Once you know the scale though.... move on to using it in context by learning some music that uses it. A guitar solo is probably what you'd want to learn. Lots of popular guitar solos use the minor pentatonic.

So don't make the common mistake of just practicing the scale up and down as fast as possible without listening..... learn to make music with it.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 29, 2010,
#3
Lets take the second postion of the minor pentatonic,

e l------o-------o----l
B l------o-------x----l
G l---o-------o-------l
D l---x----------o----l
A l---o----------o----l
E l------o-------o----l

The o's as the notes and the x's as the root note. Does the scale start on the root note and I skip the first four notes on the low E and A string and start with the root note on the D string? and play up and down ending at that note?

And sorry for my wonderful picture lol.
Last edited by butterfingers30 at Aug 29, 2010,
#4
Quote by butterfingers30
So I just started learning scales yesterday, more specificly, the minor pentatonic scales. I was looking up the five positions and had a question. With positions where the root note isnt the first note of that shape on the low e string, do you start the scale where the root note is, or do you start with the first note on the low e string even though it isn't the root note? Let me know if im not being specific enough, thanks.



When you're starting out, it's fine to do so, as you are just finding your way through what sounds like the usual box patterns. Just use your ears to work through what notes sound like they work best. Through practice and time, you'll do okay.

One of my current Academy students used to study with Justin Sandercoe, and he told me that one method Justin advocated was playing through the boxes to the root on whatever string it was, after going up and down the scale, to get a good feel where the roots reside in a given shape. He did that for a while and it seemed to help for what it was trying to do. You might try that also.

Best,

Sean
#5
Quote by butterfingers30
Lets take the second postion of the minor pentatonic,

e l------o-------o----l
B l------o-------x----l
G l---o-------o-------l
D l---x----------o----l
A l---o----------o----l
E l------o-------o----l

The o's as the notes and the x's as the root note. Does the scale start on the root note and I skip the first four notes on the low E and A string and start with the root note on the D string? and play up and down ending at that note?

And sorry for my wonderful picture lol.


Thats the idea.
shred is gaudy music
#6
You need to learn every position in order to be able to improvise everywhere on the fretboard with pentatonics
#7
Quote by avelinis
You need to learn every position in order to be able to improvise everywhere on the fretboard with pentatonics


Not necessarily, you could learn the notes in the one position and just move it around accordingly, that way you learn where the notes are and how to construct a pentatonic on the neck all on your own!

I suggest to TS though, the major scale - it keeps you out of the blues scale cliche, and you learn the most versatile scale in music
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


Quote by Holy Katana

How dare you attack the greatness of the augmented sixth?