#1
I have an amp that I got a pretty great deal for, and it sounds nice as well. The only issue is that it's hideous. The tolex is tearing in a few places and it just looks like it needs updating. I see tolex is fairly cheap and I read up on it and replacing tolex on an amp seemed relatively simple.

Anyone tried this before?
#4
Might I suggest stripping, sanding and finishing the cab? Or, is the grain entirely too hideous for that?
#5
Another hint is get your tolex from a fabric store for super cheap in the scrap section. Don't order it because that's a huge waste.
#6
Quote by charles_ebarb
Might I suggest stripping, sanding and finishing the cab? Or, is the grain entirely too hideous for that?


Its really not that bad looking. It ain't pretty by any means, but definitely not an eyesore. And yeah I have removed wallpaper and repainted rooms before, so surely I can handle this.
#7
I was referring to the grain of the wood.

ie, varnishing and adding a clearcoat
Last edited by charles_ebarb at Aug 29, 2010,
#8
Quote by charles_ebarb
I was referring to the grain of the wood.

ie, varnishing and adding a clearcoat


I'm a noob, I really don't know
#9
Quote by charles_ebarb
I was referring to the grain of the wood.

ie, varnishing and adding a clearcoat
It is probably made of plywood.
#10
If the amp is plywood, then it most likely wouldn't look good with stain. I have always liked the natural finish though. When I was making my amp cab, I thought about putting tolex on it, but had some white vinyl laying around and I used that. But I hear that tolex is pretty easy to put on,
***Guitars***
Epiphone Les Paul Custom AP (w/ 2 Seymour Duncans)
Jackson Dx10D Dinky (w/ DiMarzio PAF Bridge)
Epihpone Hummingbird

***Amps***
Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 100 (Voodoo Modified)
Custom 4x12 Halfstack (w/ Veteran 30's)
#11
Quote by cedricsmods
It is probably made of plywood.



yeah, if it is made of plywood then my suggestion is a no-go. But I just thought I would throw it out there and see if you liked the idea, too.

I am about to re-surface my cab(It's a Carvin 4x12c) and the tolex looks like hell, and I think I'm gonna give it a natural finish, and then buy a un-finished "smallbox" and give that a matching natural wood finish as well.


Anyways, good luck with your project!
#12
Quote by the1967mustang
If the amp is plywood, then it most likely wouldn't look good with stain. I have always liked the natural finish though. When I was making my amp cab, I thought about putting tolex on it, but had some white vinyl laying around and I used that. But I hear that tolex is pretty easy to put on,


That entirely depends, if it's sheet plywood, you might get lucky, if it's particle board, then your out of luck.

If you sand it enough, and apply the right stain, and just enough poly clear coat, you can make a nasty looking wood look mighty fine.

I can make white pine look awesome sanding to 400 grit and a red oak stain with 6-7 coats of simi gloss poly.
#14
I redid the tolex on a mesa a while back. I just used the tolex and adheasive from allparts. Allparts gets their stuff from Mojotone but mojo is horrible at actually sending you what you order so I highly reccomend going to allparts and letting them deal with mojotone.

If you are in the UK then go to allparts uk and if you are in the EU then go to TAD for the best prices

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1180578
#15
The hardest part is getting the material off as people said, and doing the corners.

Corners aren't too bad though if the cabinet is going to have corner covers. My 1960 clone has no covers, so it was a real pain.


Use a water soluble contact cement. It's much easier on your lungs, and extremely easy to clean up should you spill it or drip it somewhere. Don't buy that rip off tolex glue though, it's just relabeled contact cement anyway. Use super glue for the edges and corners, areas where you need fast drying but need to adjust stuff around.

There's some really good tolexing info threads on thegearpage.net, just search the forum for retolex or marshall 1960 restoration, something like that.
Last edited by earthwormjim at Aug 31, 2010,
#16
^The tolex glue I use is latex and absolutly nothing like contact cement. It goes on watter thin which which means it's esier to apply the tolex with no bubbles and when it dries there is very little glue between the tolex and the wood. Most glues are not as hard as wood when they dry so when there is a thick layer of glue it means that when your amp is banged and aboused (it happens) it's going to streach the tolex more leading to faster wear and tear. I'm not saying don't use cantact cement because I've never used it on an amp, but there are good reasons for using the thin latex glues that are sold.
#17
Quote by CorduroyEW
^The tolex glue I use is latex and absolutly nothing like contact cement. It goes on watter thin which which means it's esier to apply the tolex with no bubbles and when it dries there is very little glue between the tolex and the wood. Most glues are not as hard as wood when they dry so when there is a thick layer of glue it means that when your amp is banged and aboused (it happens) it's going to streach the tolex more leading to faster wear and tear. I'm not saying don't use cantact cement because I've never used it on an amp, but there are good reasons for using the thin latex glues that are sold.


Contact cement is as thin as paint (the water soluble is as thin as water) and is brushed on. Are you sure what you used wasn't contact cement? The water soluable contact cements are neoprene based or styrene based (i.e. latex).

Every single tolex glue that I have seen online is some form of contact cement.

Does your latex glue need to dry first, and do both pieces need to be coated for it to adhere?

Regardless, there's no good reason to buy those tolex glues. They're overpriced ($40-50 a gallon), contact cement is like $10-$15 for a whole gallon, and it is what manufacturers use anyway.
Last edited by earthwormjim at Sep 1, 2010,
#18
I didn't realize they made latex contact cement. I've only ever seen that thick rubbery stuff that is the consistancy honney. I have seen water based contact cement (didn't realize it was latex) but it was still much MUCH thicker than the glue I use on amps. Which contact cement were you using, exactly? I'll have to give it a try and see if I can't save some cash.

The glue I used did not need to be coated on both the wood and the tolex. It went on the wood only and then when the tolex went on it soaked into the cloth under the tolex creating the bond.
#19
Quote by CorduroyEW
I didn't realize they made latex contact cement. I've only ever seen that thick rubbery stuff that is the consistancy honney. I have seen water based contact cement (didn't realize it was latex) but it was still much MUCH thicker than the glue I use on amps. Which contact cement were you using, exactly? I'll have to give it a try and see if I can't save some cash.

The glue I used did not need to be coated on both the wood and the tolex. It went on the wood only and then when the tolex went on it soaked into the cloth under the tolex creating the bond.


This is the stuff I used on my Marshall 1960 clone.

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xhc/R-100158175/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

It was about $15 less though when I got it last year, I think at Lowes maybe. I can't remember where I bought it, but it is available at local hardware stores (no shipping).

It's milky white in color, and very thin. Regular contact cement can be thinned down too.

I like the application process though. Contact cement basically only clings to contact cement, so that's why you have to coat (and let dry) both pieces, the wood and tolex/cloth.
Last edited by earthwormjim at Sep 2, 2010,
#20
I used this stuff for a few projects and it's great because it doesn't stink and it rolls off your fingers when you need to clean up:


Definitely go to a fabric store before you look at ordering online. You'll find a ton of different vinyls and materials. Keep an open mind. There are all kinds of funky materials you can use.

Check out this tutorial:

http://jam4jmessageboard.websitetoolbox.com/post?id=2378719&trail=15#1/target=_blank

It's from http://www.speakerbuildersupply.com/servlet/StoreFront

They have great parts for decent prices and they ship really fast.
#21
Quote by JackoMBA
I used this stuff for a few projects and it's great because it doesn't stink and it rolls off your fingers when you need to clean up:


Definitely go to a fabric store before you look at ordering online. You'll find a ton of different vinyls and materials. Keep an open mind. There are all kinds of funky materials you can use.

Check out this tutorial:

http://jam4jmessageboard.websitetoolbox.com/post?id=2378719&trail=15#1/target=_blank

.



I would not do the corners like in that tutorial though. The edges will never really line up perfectly that way, a miter cut is how it should be done.

This is how it's done: http://www.thegearpage.net/board/showpost.php?p=712111&postcount=35

That is a good tutorial all around though, what you posted.