#2
The one I used didn't cost any money and worked great. Simply start with A on the 6th string and then find all the other As. Then, find the B on the 6th string and do the same thing. Do this for all the notes. Eventually, start adding in the accidentals. After a few months, I had all the notes memorized. I don't use that technique any longer, but I still remember all the notes.

Edit: This is the same technique I teach my students. Once they have that down, I teach another technique to help improve speed recognition. If you'd like to know more, just PM me.
Last edited by KG6_Steven at Aug 29, 2010,
#3
I don't mean to hijack the thread, but since we're on this topic, are there any 'games' which can help with translating music notation to the actual guitar frets? Musictheory did help a lot with recognising notes on the staff, but I can't seem to find any that helps with the frets.
#4
The other day i was thinkng of a way to learn the entire fretboard and scales. What Im doing is select a scale (lets say C major) and play the middle C (the root of the scale). Immediately play the C major scale in the 6th string starting with the open string or the closest note in the case of another scale. So you would play E-F-G-A-B-C-D-E... until you reach your highest note. Then repeat the same (playing the root) and playing the notes of the scale starting on the 5th string. You repeat this until you reach the first string. This is how people like Scofield or Mike Stern suggest you should learn the fretboard.

What I usually do is write as much as I can, and what I suggest to do is write separately the notes of the scale on a fretboard map and then join all of them. Look out for all of the roots and circle them and find scale shapes in it. Try to experiment with this. A hint is that you can start a scale with either your first, second or fourth finger and in some cases with your third finger so for each string you have three shapes. Find to link all of them and do this with all of the scales you wish to learn. Write the notes and try to write everything in a fretboard map because as a guitarrist you should always visualize the fretboard but you should also listen to what you play.
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#6
Quote by triface
I don't mean to hijack the thread, but since we're on this topic, are there any 'games' which can help with translating music notation to the actual guitar frets? Musictheory did help a lot with recognising notes on the staff, but I can't seem to find any that helps with the frets.

Three words for you: practice practice practice.
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#7
Quote by oneblackened
Three words for you: practice practice practice.

I'm very lazy.

Still worth a shot asking right?
#8
While the games in my OP help, I'm not sure if they help the way I should be memorizing the fretboard. I memorize the notes where the dots are, but the others are usually deduced from from the adjacent dots. For example, the 6th string, first dot on 3rd fret is G and therefore the fourth fret is G#.
Last edited by ajsguitar at Aug 30, 2010,
#10
Quote by ajsguitar
While the games in my OP help, I'm not sure if they help the way I should be memorizing the fretboard. I memorize the notes where the dots are, but the others are usually deduced from from the adjacent dots. For example, the 6th string, first dot on 3rd fret is G and therefore the fourth fret is G#.


WHile this may not be the conventional way of doing it, the more you get used to rapidly naming the notes of the fretboard, the more you are actually remembering the notes on the fretboard, so just keep on practicing!
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