#1
This may be a stupid question, but when creating a melody, do you move between scales corresponding to the chords of the progression?

i.e.: if playing Em F G, would you play notes from an Em scale, then an F scale, then a G scale (corresponding to which chord is being played at the moment)

sorry if it is confusing or dumb
#2
nope thats definatly not it but i tthink its more like all the chords have notes in common with a scale and that would be the scale you play??any1 correct me if im wrong
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#3
the chords Em, F, and G are all in the C major scale, so it would sound good if you created a melody with the C major scale.
music is all about sound, so if you like the sound of a melody in C# major over that chord progression (it would be VEEERY dissonant), then go for it.
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#5
Well, no. I guess you could if you wanted to. Most people use a chord progression based upon the scale, and stick with the progression. C major is c d e f g a b. I V IV is a common progression, so that'd be C F G in C major. Em F G would be iii IV V in C major. You use the C major scale if the progression is in C major. I'd suggest learning a little more theory before writing anything, but I guess you don't necessarily have to in order to sound good.
#6
If you're improvising, I guess. It's a bit harder like that, but some jazz guys say they do it and manage. The best way to improvise is actually the simplest: just hit as many chord tones as possible and occasionally miss. If you do it rhythmically and can somehow phrase it, it usually sounds better than doing all these weird scale/mode changes.

If you're composing music, it really depends on your harmony. If you have a simple harmony that's just 3 or 4 chords, not usually. As I said in another thread, sometimes you have chord progressions within chords, so it looks like you're modulating. This is a situation where you'd change scales. I doubt that's something you're trying to do, but I'm sure it's nice to know.

So that answer to your question is mostly no, sometimes yes.
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#7
Well first you have to identify the key of the song, and this will identify the ONE scale that you play over ALL the chords. Unfortunately you've picked an ambiguous chord progression.

For your chord progression, instead of going for C major as the key, I'm opting towards G major, with the F major borrowed from the parallel minor. As a result you'll want to add accidentals to the G major scale whilst playing over the F chord so notes don't clash with it.

Sound confusing? That's because this is just a little beyond the horizon for you. Look into key and chord theory to identify keys in the songs first.
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#8
Usually you would start with the IV V or VI chords to define a scale before you go into the iii or vii sort of ones. Chords normally correspond to the notes of your base melody, and the best (or the most memorable) melodies stay in the scale or, if they modulate, end in the original scale. It is very unusual to change scales purely because of the chords.
#10
Quote by davedavedave1
This may be a stupid question, but when creating a melody, do you move between scales corresponding to the chords of the progression?

i.e.: if playing Em F G, would you play notes from an Em scale, then an F scale, then a G scale (corresponding to which chord is being played at the moment)

sorry if it is confusing or dumb


Yes, no, kinda. Most people tend to find the key / scale the chords are in and stick to that.
(Or they find the chords with the scale). If anything, it's the safest way because as long as you stay in key, no note will be really wrong (sort off, you can still make a note sound out of place but it wont sound terrible)

But it is definitly possible to change scale following the chord. This especialy works well if you highlight the difference or 'color notes' of each chord / scale where they differ. It's more difficult and involving to get it right, but the results tend to sound more intresting.
#11
Quote by davedavedave1
This may be a stupid question, but when creating a melody, do you move between scales corresponding to the chords of the progression?

i.e.: if playing Em F G, would you play notes from an Em scale, then an F scale, then a G scale (corresponding to which chord is being played at the moment)

sorry if it is confusing or dumb


It's a good question.

It helps to understand the relationships of scales and keys to chords.

Once you do that you look at the chords, and figure out what key they most likely come from.

Many times that information can suggest a scale whose notes fit well over the entire thing. Looking at this, I'd say if you resolve it to E that you can play an E Phrygian. But More than likely, the G will pull it back to C Major (This analysis would call this to mind as I understand chord/key/scale relationships).

If we make the tonal center of Em - then we have E Phrygian. I'd personally figure this to be a iii IV and V in C, even though you don't have C here, I'd see this as a fragment progression, but if it loops then it will be E Phrygian and I could play it all over as long as I concentrate the tonal center over E, which will be quite hard since my last chord in the Vamp is a V of C.

If you call it the Key of G with the vi used as a sub for the I, to start it off, the b7(G) is indicative of it being Mixolydian.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Aug 30, 2010,