#1
Hello everyone at UG, I'm new here.

I have been practicing guitar seriously for about 2 1/2 months now. I have learned my 7 Modes horizontally and vertically and Dm, Gm and Am Pentatonic.
I have also learned the Hungarian Minor scale.

I would like to ask members if they could post some nice Licks that they've created or that they like to use from their guitar influences. Also any Scales that I should learn and practice?

I like Guitarists such as Randy Rhoads, Zakk Wylde, Dimebag, Synyster Gates, Slash, and Mick Mars

Also I play in DADGBE and in the Key of Dm/F

Thank you everyone.
#2
Quote by AtticusAce
Also I play in DADGBE and in the Key of Dm/F

Why the limitation?
#3
You have to understand that you don't have to learn scales in different keys, once you learn it you can just move it about.

Why drop D tuning? I mean might as well stay in E standard, makes things easier, especially for a beginner. Don't experiment too much at this stage of playing, it won't pay off.

All of these players are pretty much pentatonic players, with some blues or natural minor mixed in. Either way it's pretty much pentatonic box playing.
#4
It must be pretty hazardous only knowing modes, and only be able to play in the key of D minor or F major. You can't use modes in minor or major keys.

But to address your question, learn major and minor scales. Also the major and minor pentatonics. There may be a chance that you already know these, but call them modes. Next step would be learning how to apply them to new keys.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
Quote by AlanHB
It must be pretty hazardous only knowing modes, and only be able to play in the key of D minor or F major. You can't use modes in minor or major keys.

But to address your question, learn major and minor scales. Also the major and minor pentatonics. There may be a chance that you already know these, but call them modes. Next step would be learning how to apply them to new keys.


I learned Dm Am and Gm Pentatonic and Blues Scales. I also learned Dm C Bb and Am Arpeggios. After posting the this Thread I worked on Harmonic minor and Harmonic Raised 7th Scales.
#6
Quote by pwrmax
Why the limitation?

I don't know how to switch from one Key to another properly so I play in one Key.
#7
Quote by piszczel
You have to understand that you don't have to learn scales in different keys, once you learn it you can just move it about.

Why drop D tuning? I mean might as well stay in E standard, makes things easier, especially for a beginner. Don't experiment too much at this stage of playing, it won't pay off.

All of these players are pretty much pentatonic players, with some blues or natural minor mixed in. Either way it's pretty much pentatonic box playing.

I use Drop D so I can do do single finger power chords on the DAD strings. And I use the ADGBE strings for the Lead playing.
#8
All I am asking is if anyone has any cool licks they would like to share or talk about.
#9
Quote by AtticusAce
All I am asking is if anyone has any cool licks they would like to share or talk about.

The licks that usually sound cool are some pull offs/hammer ons across few strings e.g.
E--12-17p12--15p12-------|
B--------------------------15--|
(repeat) Play this fast
etc.

The thing is, not to rain on your parade, but at 2.5 months of guitar playing I would rather focus on the very basics and perfecting rhythm playing rather than lead. I understand that everyone wants to be a shredder from the start but you have some basics to cover haha.

Once you have a sufficient knowledge of scales etc. you will quite easily start creating your own licks.
#10
Quote by piszczel
The licks that usually sound cool are some pull offs/hammer ons across few strings e.g.
E--12-17p12--15p12-------|
B--------------------------15--|
(repeat) Play this fast
etc.

The thing is, not to rain on your parade, but at 2.5 months of guitar playing I would rather focus on the very basics and perfecting rhythm playing rather than lead. I understand that everyone wants to be a shredder from the start but you have some basics to cover haha.

Once you have a sufficient knowledge of scales etc. you will quite easily start creating your own licks.


Thanks for the lick.
Yes, Rhythm. I practice a lot. I learned Horizontal Scales and practiced making riffs with them. I practice slow with a metronome to make them cleaner.
#11
Okay man I have a few things I'm gonna point out.
1) Play in standard. Playing in drop D will only hurt you at this point. Learn in standard, and then learn other tunings later.
2) You should be more focused on learning to play rhythm at this point. Learn open chords, barred chords, power chords, and if you're up to it learn some jazz chords. Rhythm is 90% of music, so you should be more focused on that than anything else.
3) Right now any leads should be based off of the Pentatonic, Major, and Minor scales and the blues scale. Most of the stuff the guitarists you listed play is based off of that.
Quote by L2112Lif
I put a ton of my capital into SW Airlines... The next day, THE NEXT DAY these nutters fly into the WTC. What the hell? Apparently no one wanted to fly anymore, and I was like "What gives? God damnit Osama, let me win a fuggin' game!"
#12
Quote by IRISH_PUNK13
Okay man I have a few things I'm gonna point out.
1) Play in standard. Playing in drop D will only hurt you at this point. Learn in standard, and then learn other tunings later.
2) You should be more focused on learning to play rhythm at this point. Learn open chords, barred chords, power chords, and if you're up to it learn some jazz chords. Rhythm is 90% of music, so you should be more focused on that than anything else.
3) Right now any leads should be based off of the Pentatonic, Major, and Minor scales and the blues scale. Most of the stuff the guitarists you listed play is based off of that.

My teacher said it's alright to have my Electric in Drop D. I keep my Acoustic in Standard and practice Chords and Arpeggios on both. I do plan on taking some Jazz or Classical courses to learn more about Chords. I have practiced a lot of Rhythm lately and my pick attack sequences. Sorry if it sounds like I just want to learn all Lead, that's not the case, I wanted to learn a few licks so I could add on to them or throw them in to some playing.
#13
I think a lot of these are probably a bit advanced but there are a LOT of them
http://www.myguitarsolo.com/Licks/Licks.htm

It's good that you have a teacher. Ask him about playing a scale in different keys and how to play in different keys in general. It's really not very hard to do on guitar.

Perhaps I'm interpreting this wrong, but harmonic minor IS a natural minor scale with a raised seventh so I'm not really sure what harmonic raised seventh is.

If you learned the 'modes' starting on different frets, that's your major scale across the fretboard. If you learned them starting on the same fret, that's the pattern of the mode (although there's a little more to modes than just a pattern)
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#14
It must be pretty hazardous only knowing modes, and only be able to play in the key of D minor or F major. You can't use modes in minor or major keys.

But to address your question, learn major and minor scales. Also the major and minor pentatonics. There may be a chance that you already know these, but call them modes. Next step would be learning how to apply them to new keys.
#15
Quote by AtticusAce
I don't know how to switch from one Key to another properly so I play in one Key.


You said you can only play in one Key.

The cool thing is, if you really do know your scales like you say(such as minor pentatonic, as an example), that means you actually know it in all Keys!

For instance, if you know Minor Pentatonic's position in the key of A, all you have to do is shift the entire thing down 2 frets(toward the head :P) to be in the key of G. Or shift it from A to the key of E by moving it down 5 frets. Or to the key of C by moving up 3 frets!

I hope this helps, and that I understood your quote correctly.
#16
Quote by Rvn
You said you can only play in one Key.

The cool thing is, if you really do know your scales like you say(such as minor pentatonic, as an example), that means you actually know it in all Keys!

For instance, if you know Minor Pentatonic's position in the key of A, all you have to do is shift the entire thing down 2 frets(toward the head :P) to be in the key of G. Or shift it from A to the key of E by moving it down 5 frets. Or to the key of C by moving up 3 frets!

I hope this helps, and that I understood your quote correctly.


Oh, thank you very much. So if I have the Dm, Gm and Am Pentatonic Scales does it mean I play in each one of those Keys or is it just in Dm?
Dm is Dm, Edim, F, Gm, Am, Bb, and C so I am playing in an individual key for each?
#17
Quote by FacetOfChaos
I think a lot of these are probably a bit advanced but there are a LOT of them
http://www.myguitarsolo.com/Licks/Licks.htm

It's good that you have a teacher. Ask him about playing a scale in different keys and how to play in different keys in general. It's really not very hard to do on guitar.

Perhaps I'm interpreting this wrong, but harmonic minor IS a natural minor scale with a raised seventh so I'm not really sure what harmonic raised seventh is.

If you learned the 'modes' starting on different frets, that's your major scale across the fretboard. If you learned them starting on the same fret, that's the pattern of the mode (although there's a little more to modes than just a pattern)


Alright, I'll ask him next time.
I don't know exactly what it is, I was learning Yngwie Malmsteen single string licks and it said it was a Harmonic Minor with a raised seventh.
#18
Quote by AtticusAce
Oh, thank you very much. So if I have the Dm, Gm and Am Pentatonic Scales does it mean I play in each one of those Keys or is it just in Dm?
Dm is Dm, Edim, F, Gm, Am, Bb, and C so I am playing in an individual key for each?

It's probably best to think of them as totally separate for now. The context determines what the key is. Do those three pentatonic scales you know share the same pattern of spaces between frets?
As Rvn said, you just start on the note that you want the scale to start on.
If you play that Dm pentatonic scale shape but move it up two frets, you'll be playing an Em pentatonic. If you take the Dm pentatonic scale shape but move it up 7 frets, you'll be playing an Am pentatonic.

Dm, Gm, and Am pentatonic scales have different notes. Play each one over a progression with the same tonic and it should sound fine. If you're playing over a Dm progression with the Am pentatonic, some of the notes could clash. Stick to D over D, E over E, etc until you feel very comfortable with it.

For your chords of Dm listed, you wouldn't change scales/key for each chord. There are styles/techniques that utilize that but at this point, I wouldn't worry about that.
Stick to playing the same scale as the tonic/key.

Harmonic minor with the seventh raised would effectively get rid of the seventh degree sound wise. I'm thinking that just harmonic minor was what was intended, which is a natural minor scale with a raised seventh.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
Last edited by FacetOfChaos at Sep 4, 2010,
#19
Quote by AtticusAce
Oh, thank you very much. So if I have the Dm, Gm and Am Pentatonic Scales does it mean I play in each one of those Keys or is it just in Dm?
Dm is Dm, Edim, F, Gm, Am, Bb, and C so I am playing in an individual key for each?



Here, read this. This makes it super easy to understand. It helped me a lot.

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/easy_guide_to_the_minor_pentatonic_scale.html

Basically, it shows you the entire E minor pentatonic scale, and then breaks it into the five widely used 'boxes'.

Just pay attention to the top half for now. Don't worry about that led zeppelin stuff at the bottom. Just focus on learning your scale.

Think of a scale as boxes on a conveyor belt. Depending on what key your song is in, you move the conveyor belt forward or backwards, but all the 'boxes' stay in the same place relative to each other.

This is the best i can personally explain it. I myself am still learning things like this but I hope by explaining how i'm learning, that it might also help you.
Last edited by Rvn at Sep 4, 2010,
#20
Quote by AtticusAce
Hello everyone at UG, I'm new here.

I have been practicing guitar seriously for about 2 1/2 months now. I have learned my 7 Modes horizontally and vertically and Dm, Gm and Am Pentatonic.
I have also learned the Hungarian Minor scale.

I would like to ask members if they could post some nice Licks that they've created or that they like to use from their guitar influences. Also any Scales that I should learn and practice?

I like Guitarists such as Randy Rhoads, Zakk Wylde, Dimebag, Synyster Gates, Slash, and Mick Mars

Also I play in DADGBE and in the Key of Dm/F

Thank you everyone.


Hungarian Minor? Really? What chords do Hungarian minor sound best against? Where would you apply a Hungarian minor? What are the characteristic qualities of the Hungarian Minor?

What's the point of learning how to play these if you have no understanding of the guitar? This seems like a haphazard learning progression at best. I wish I could evaluate your knowledge personally, as I'm sure you'd be springing leaks like a life raft in seconds. I'm not saying its your fault or anything, but thats a lot of random knowledge and wasted time with zero understanding, to show for it.

There is no Harmonic Minor with a Raised 7th. It doesn't exist, a Raised raised 7th is a Root.

There is a Natural Minor with a raised (actually a Natural) 7th from the usual b7, that is called a Harmonic Minor.


Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Sep 4, 2010,
#21
Quote by Sean0913
Hungarian Minor? Really? What chords do Hungarian minor sound best against? Where would you apply a Hungarian minor? What are the characteristic qualities of the Hungarian Minor?

What's the point of learning how to play these if you have no understanding of the guitar? This seems like a haphazard learning progression at best. I wish I could evaluate your knowledge personally, as I'm sure you'd be springing leaks like a life raft in seconds. I'm not saying its your fault or anything, but thats a lot of random knowledge and wasted time with zero understanding, to show for it.

There is no Harmonic Minor with a Raised 7th. It doesn't exist, a Raised raised 7th is a Root.

There is a Natural Minor with a raised (actually a Natural) 7th from the usual b7, that is called a Harmonic Minor.


Best,

Sean


I wondered the same stuff, and though in his OP he didn't necessarily ask for it, I linked for him the very basics of scales(at least, i think it's pretty much the basics). Hehe.

It just seemed that he was a little ahead of himself. I may be a noobie, but I hope it was ok for me to help someone with the little knowledge I do have. At least, I suppose it was not 'terrible' advice I gave, as no one has ripped my head off yet... Lol.
Last edited by Rvn at Sep 4, 2010,
#22
Yes, sorry. It's a Harmonic Minor. The Natural Minor with a raised 7th. My fault, too much party time in me.
#23
Quote by Sean0913
Hungarian Minor? Really? What chords do Hungarian minor sound best against? Where would you apply a Hungarian minor? What are the characteristic qualities of the Hungarian Minor?

It's a Harmonic Minor with a raised 4th
#25
Quote by FacetOfChaos
It's probably best to think of them as totally separate for now. The context determines what the key is. Do those three pentatonic scales you know share the same pattern of spaces between frets?
As Rvn said, you just start on the note that you want the scale to start on.
If you play that Dm pentatonic scale shape but move it up two frets, you'll be playing an Em pentatonic. If you take the Dm pentatonic scale shape but move it up 7 frets, you'll be playing an Am pentatonic.

Dm, Gm, and Am pentatonic scales have different notes. Play each one over a progression with the same tonic and it should sound fine. If you're playing over a Dm progression with the Am pentatonic, some of the notes could clash. Stick to D over D, E over E, etc until you feel very comfortable with it.

For your chords of Dm listed, you wouldn't change scales/key for each chord. There are styles/techniques that utilize that but at this point, I wouldn't worry about that.
Stick to playing the same scale as the tonic/key.


Thank you very much FacetOfChaos.
#26
Quote by timfoley
wow you just answered all of his questions (sarcasm)

I only know the Am, E, F7, and B7b5 with it.

It's used by Randy Rhoads, Joe Satriani, and Ritchie Blackmore.
#27
Quote by AtticusAce
I only know the Am, E, F7, and B7b5 with it.

It's used by Randy Rhoads, Joe Satriani, and Ritchie Blackmore.


There is no F7

There's an Augmented, 2 minors 2 major 7ths, and a diminished, just to name a few.

The F7 would clash with the E

Theres also a 13b5 and b9 chord and a MinMaj7 chord.

Might want to let your teacher know.

Best,

Sean
#28
Where would a hungarian minor scale be played, honestly? If i understand you correctly it's spelt 1-2-b3-#4-5-b6-7-1. So you could play over a m7b5 if you used the natural 7th only as a passing tone, or over a dom7 chord if you did the same thing with that b3. Alternatively, it adds a blue note to the harmonic minor scale you already have.

Ultimately though, this is knowledge that is basically useless to you at this point, what the other posters have said about saving your effort learning fancy scales and focusing on your development as it pertains to playing in key and learning how keys and scales work together is true and much more important.