#1
I've got my Strat tuned to Dropped C but I haven't done any setting up for it. It's been tuned that way for a few months now, but in the long run is that going to damage my guitar at all? Last year I loosened the truss rod by about 3 turns if I remember correctly, but the truss rod isn't accessible at the headstock, I have to take the neck right off to make any adjustments, so I would rather not have to do that again (it makes me nervous). I use Ernie Ball regular slinkies, which I think are .10 gauge.

So basically what I'm asking, is there anything I need to do that I can do myself, or should I take it into a pro? I would really rather not take it into a shop as I don't really live near any, but if it's a short process then I might be able to take a day trip to a music shop if absolutely necessary.
#2
Quote by Turkeyburger
I've got my Strat tuned to Dropped C but I haven't done any setting up for it. It's been tuned that way for a few months now, but in the long run is that going to damage my guitar at all?I use Ernie Ball regular slinkies, which I think are .10 gauge.


If you have it in Drop C (CGCFAD) and haven't made any adjustments your intonation is propably way off. But that's really no thing to harm your guitar.

I'd be more worried about using 10-46 strings for Drop C. They're way too slinky which means there's less tension on the neck. This can cause problems in the long run. A proper set would be for example Ernie Ball 11-54 or 12-56 - or DR 10-56 which would propably be my pick.


Quote by Turkeyburger
Last year I loosened the truss rod by about 3 turns if I remember correctly, but the truss rod isn't accessible at the headstock, I have to take the neck right off to make any adjustments, so I would rather not have to do that again (it makes me nervous).


3 WHOLE turns is ****ing lot. But since it's 10-46 strings I guess it's no wonder you had to loosen it so much to get ANY natural neck bow (relief).


Quote by Turkeyburger
So basically what I'm asking, is there anything I need to do that I can do myself, or should I take it into a pro? I would really rather not take it into a shop as I don't really live near any, but if it's a short process then I might be able to take a day trip to a music shop if absolutely necessary.


1) Adjust the truss rod somewhat back how it was. If it's that loose you'll have problems with thicker strings (they cause neck to bend too much).

2) Replace the 10-46 strings with thicker ones.

3) See how it plays.

-> Not good? Adjust bridge height first to see if the problem goes away.

-> Still not good? Test relief and adjust truss rod tighter or looser accordingly.

4) Adjust bridge and intonation properly.

Or take it to a shop.

Generally speaking it's problematic to have a guitar like that (with hidden truss rod adjustment) for "weird" tunings.
Last edited by Rautio at Aug 31, 2010,
#3
I change from drop c - standard all the time and my inotation stays fine between tunings,

I'd use 10-52s for Drop C minimum TBH

And then 9-46 for standard.

And i use standard 12s on my Drop B guitar

The most important thing is, Does the guitar play well? If so, Then you don't need a setup really. Unless you have some sort of stupid setup going on with your guitar with like bass strings or have it in a weird sorta room then the guitar should be fine
#5
Alright so I put .11's on it and checked the action, I looked online and it said that you're supposed to put a capo on the 1st fret, hold down on the 17th and fit a business card or a credit card at the 7th fret which apparently is how you check for bowing or something like that. Either way, both cards fit pretty snugly under the string. So, am I good now or what?
#6
Quote by Turkeyburger
Alright so I put .11's on it and checked the action, I looked online and it said that you're supposed to put a capo on the 1st fret, hold down on the 17th and fit a business card or a credit card at the 7th fret which apparently is how you check for bowing or something like that. Either way, both cards fit pretty snugly under the string. So, am I good now or what?


You measured the relief right.

You're propably good. Though I personally consider there to be too much leeway if a credit card fits in. I usually just fret the first with my left hand and then right thumb on a higher fret and see how much there's a feel of leeway with my right index. A bit is good - that's where I start - and then test by playing.

See how it plays. There's most likely no buzz on the lower frets (due to the curve in middle) but see the frets from 10 and higher. I've found that if the neck is bowing too much then it starts to buzz at higher frets. If that's the case and you don't like it - youve gotta tweak the truss rod a tad tighter, some 1/8 of a turn.

And then adjust intonation
Last edited by Rautio at Sep 6, 2010,