#1


This is just a little Q+A I did on another site for fun. I thought perhaps you might find some use in it. I don't know what tags are accepted here so the format might be a bit wonky but the information is all there.


On August 22 2010 01:07 Galois wrote:
Can you please explain in detail the fingerpicking position that I first read about? I got the impression that I'm only allowed to use my first, second, and third fingers to pick the strings and my thumb for the 6th string. I didn't really understand this and the tutorial I found on it didn't really get through to me unfortunately.

Here's a link for your pleasure to the lesson I'm talking about:

http://guitar.about.com/library/weekly/aa020601c.htm




You will need to clean up your question a bit for me >_< , I'm not really sure what you are not getting. The finger movement? Where to put your fingers? The hand position?

I couldn't find any great right hand shots, but this is pretty good.

oh here too

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That tutorial is an alright starting point, but know that both fingers and thumbs can go anywhere, their home position is like he says, but they don't live out their whole lives at home.

Do this - (no left hand ) Play the low E string with your thumb (the big string) , then, with your index, play the G string, the with your middle, the B string . There, you just fingerpicked with at least some sort of fluency. Did your hand move alot? Then, let's try and fix it this time. Pick again, try just from the fingers, the hand needn't move much at all. Relax , relax, try again.

Feel free to ask more questions on this subject...




On August 22 2010 01:09 Chromyne wrote:
I have been playing guitar casually for about 2 1/2 years. I am wondering what the best way to learn to sort of decorate as a secondary acoustic. Say the main guitarist is playing chords, is there a preferred way to learning how to play fills or licks to complement the main guitarist? My first guess would be to learn scales (like where more improvising starts?), what do you think?





Hey Bro-chro..

The most obvious way - arpeggiate the chord he is playing, sprinkles on the cupcake. Learn different voicings for each chord so you can twinkle on the high notes or add depth in a lower position.

After that, you are right about the scales thing. This is your next stop and what I would say is this. Begin to learn the notes on your neck, say the first 3 strings (the skinny ones ) up to the 3rd fret each. Then, with each chord change, simply play the root of each chord, no more. There, you are soloing and improvising and all that.

Only after you could feel comfortable with any chord change , try adding one other note per bar. Never worry about making the "wrong note" . There never is a wrong note, just a sound you aren't used to , or didn't expect. Slowly add more notes between chord changes, try for 3, always trying to land on the root of the next chord when he changes.

Other than that, I usually think texturally, in that most often when you are in key, it doesn't really matter what you play, but how much you play. Is it dense, or sparse? This is important to take note of as it has a lot of power to drive a song.

I like questions on improvising...




On August 22 2010 01:11 koreasilver wrote:
The next girl that asks me to play "Wonderwall" when I have my guitar is going to get a solid slab of ash smashed into their solar plexus.




Hah, well we all have our coping mechanisms..... Maybe we can all trade some.



On August 22 2010 01:12 SirGlinG wrote:
I'm playing in a band and it's getting more and more serious.
I'm wondering if it ever gets really important to know the theory behind it all?



Great job for taking the next step. I absolutely and totally encourage you do pursue this. It will take some work, but it will be an absolute delight.

Right now, you are musically illiterate. You can speak the language (though I will say with a limited vocabulary) but can't communicate anything beyond common ideas.

Go up to my post for "chromyne" for a good starting point. Remember this : Theory is not a rule book, it's a timesaver for us to access sounds we like, and remember how we got there. So if in the future we want a similar sound that we had, we _know_ where it comes from. Better yet, if you want to know how to NOT get the same sound, you know where to break new ground.

10 minutes a day on this and in a year you will be miles ahead of your alternate reality self that didn't take the 10 minutes. Don't stress about it, it's a beautiful side of music that will help you grow.

do it, and ask more quesitons if you have any about it.


Last edited by nightwind at Aug 31, 2010,
#2
On August 22 2010 01:13 SubtleArt wrote:
I absolutely love listening to rock (classic, hard rock, and progressive rock) and some metal (like black sabbath and deep purple), so I'm really interested in starting to learn electric guitar. Is it too late to start tho? I wanna actually be good and play well. Right now I'm 18 and the only musical experience I have is being grade 8 in piano and 2 years of music theory.





MY FRIEND

ITS NEVER TOO LATE

START TODAY! BORROW A GUITAR GO GET ONE!!

Listen, we get out what we put in. Many people have been playing for decades and aren't much farther ahead of where they started. No hatin, just sayin, you get what you put in.

Promise yourself you will try for 15 minutes a day, no more no less for a month. From there ask yourself again. By the time you finish university you could be much more abled than pretty much any of your rock heros in terms of technical skill (not to diminish them). That's just a few years, not counting how fun it is to nail riffs you've loved for so long, coming out of your hands.




On August 22 2010 01:15 Lexpar wrote:
Noob question: How do I transfer from D to C without wanting to cut off my stupid sausage fingers for being to slow?


On August 22 2010 01:19 Archaic wrote:
A key to chord changing is looking at your fingers and considering efficiency. (Assuming you're going xx0232 to x32010), look at your D. Your ring finger + middle finger pressing the high B + E are in the exact same position as they should be for the C, pressing the A + D. Just keep that exact same position, move upwards, while your index finger slides back one fret (on the same string). Eventually you'll get it. Practice!





Thanks for the help , it is great advice.

I always say "plan your routes" in the starting phases. Take a second and see how each finger is going to get to where it is going.

Now Sexy Lexy, you are at the part in guitar playing , what I call the *first* wall. People tend to think that making a chord change on time is only for the select few, or rhythmically gifted or something. No, here's the problem....

Chord changing is made of two things , the chord, and the change - duh. The problem is most people only ever work on the chord, the clarity and accuracy. This is great! But that doesn't help the change.

So practise the change! Play the D, then count very slowly to 4, and by the time you get to 1 (1 comes after 4, hah) strum the C.

The catch - you have to strum NO MATTER WHAT YOUR LEFT HAND IS DOING. Don't worry if you get some chunky or crackly notes. We aren't practicing the accuracy right now, but the rhythm, so it's a success if you strum at the right time. Do this very slow. What we are doing is this.

Most people pause the right hand so the left hand can get where it wants to go. When we do this we train our brain to think that the left hand gets to have all the time we need. It's not our intention, but it's the reality.

So, with the rhythm practise we say "listen, we are going to make it to the party on time, so wether or not you want to get your make up in time or look like shit isn't my problem!" . Right hand is boss.

So, practice BOTH PARTS of _chord_ _changes_ and you will make it out alive as the two will slowly combine to make a smooth chord change.


Fewf, a workout !!


On August 22 2010 01:15 koreasilver wrote:
If you play an instrument it should be implied that you at least know your scales.



Kissy kiss to you. Especially on the guitar where patterns have a way to rule supreme. When I speak to someone I assume they can read the language we are speaking. Yes there are cases when this isn't true, that should be the exception. Take your musical journey and learn all you can!
Last edited by nightwind at Aug 31, 2010,
#3
On August 22 2010 01:23 Azerbaijan wrote:
My wall is applying modes in composing and improvising. I understand how modes are constructed out of major scales and how they different patterns of whole and half steps create different sounds out of the modes but I feel like there is some key element that has just never "clicked" in my head when it comes to this stuff.

So if you can explain anything about modes that might help or even just suggest a book/website or anything that might help I would be grateful.



Ahh I love talking about this stuff, my fingers are taking a shit kicking through this post though haha. ok.....


To truly uncover the sound of a mode, you don't just rip solos in the mode. You need to see the farther reaching consequences...

Take lydian for example, it is a major scale with a #4

Ok, so what?

Go through every chord in the scale and add that note and take note of what happens.

In standard C major, I can't have an F# in my tonic chord, but in C lydian , it's a defining trait. A very beautiful chord too, if you add in a B as well..

-0
-0
-0
-4
-3
-

What about the second chord, D minor ? Well, now it's a D major! Ok, so in C major we would have CM then Dm, but in C lydian we have C M then DM , That's unique.

Keep going. Ahh, E minor can become an Emin9! very pretty chord...

Now our IV chord has become wonked! I love it. instead of F major as our IV, we have F# half dim. INTERESTING.

Also G7 becomes GM7. A minor6 now has a major 6, which I think is a great great chord.

finally, Bdim becomes B- !! That's a fairly big deal , even if it doesn't sound like much.


So, we've uncovered the harmony so far. Go explore this yourself and find ways to play these chords. Do you see how much one note has changed our tonality so far? Go play these chords and get them in your ear, hear the lydianess of different progressions as opposed to just C major. Do this, come back when you need me.




On August 22 2010 01:26 Emon_ wrote:
I feel like I've plateaued and I don't know where to turn to improve. I can play a lot of songs by seeing the chords and I've tried to learn about scales and how it all fits together. My main interest is in rhythm guitar, but I only have a rough idea of what to train. Is there some direction you can point me to, maybe some good acoustic songs with great rhythms? I've been playing as a hobby for 3 years



Emon, like that soul pop singer with the single from the 90s? "**** it" ? I'm going to go listen to it while I talk with you...

I think I need a slightly better idea of the music you like and your current skill level. So you just want to play chords as good as you possibly can?

Sorry for making fun of your name for longer than your answer. I just need a bit more info ; )

Last edited by nightwind at Aug 31, 2010,
#4
PLEASE help me!!! I am a beginner but picking up a lot by ear. The problem is i found a load of tab for the Levellers and they say to tune down 2 half steps?? Isn't that a whole step or am i being ignorant to the theory side of playing. If you could help i would be soooo grateful for the retuned notes from standard when tuned down 2 half steps.
#6
Nightwind.

A couple thoughts.

First, congratulations for your intelligent answer to chords modes, and Lydian is an obvious one with the raised 4th, i.e Maj7#11. Kudos for that. The only thing to make sure that is understood is the key center needs to resolve on the root. The tendency for "Hi Jacking" form F Lydian to a C Major is very strong if careful attention is not paid to that key center.

Second, another way for embellishment is using upper voicings to imply extensions, - for example, playing over C maj, I could play a B and D diad, or arrangement with D on the highest voice, to imply a Maj 9 chord.

Another great embellishment is suspension licks over the root...very common. 3 4 3 to root.

Best,

Sean
#7
Quote by Sean0913
Nightwind.

A couple thoughts.

First, congratulations for your intelligent answer to chords modes, and Lydian is an obvious one with the raised 4th, i.e Maj7#11. Kudos for that. The only thing to make sure that is understood is the key center needs to resolve on the root. The tendency for "Hi Jacking" form F Lydian to a C Major is very strong if careful attention is not paid to that key center.

Second, another way for embellishment is using upper voicings to imply extensions, - for example, playing over C maj, I could play a B and D diad, or arrangement with D on the highest voice, to imply a Maj 9 chord.

Another great embellishment is suspension licks over the root...very common. 3 4 3 to root.

Best,

Sean



^^ Yep, I'm fully aware of it. It happened that the fellow I was speaking to was really new to the idea, and I wanted to encourage his explorations and let him come upon those questions himself (that's the kind of guy I knew him to be ). I'm sure you would have done the same in my position, but you are right that that is a major problem people learning the modes have.
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#8
Thank you sooooo much, you're a star! Even when i typed in the query into the internet search it didn't give an answer, thanx!!! Keep this forum going.xx