#1
I've micd my amp with a sure sm57 up close and am using a tascam us144 interface and a macbook with garageband....

when I play back what I've recorded it sounds like it was recorded in a large room...not an echo like with delay effects...its like a reverb. but i know it isnt my reverb settings...

I've been recording in my garage...is that the problem??? Does it have to do with my amp volume or mic position?...
#2
That's probably the real reverb from your garage. So yes, the garage is the problem. Not much you can do about it except put up some stuff to dampen the sound, but you won't get too good results unless you spend a lot of money.
#3
Thanks for the the reply...

In a typical household what would you say is the best location for recording? Assuming I don't have to worry about neighbors
#4
Quote by Alex Vik
That's probably the real reverb from your garage. So yes, the garage is the problem. Not much you can do about it except put up some stuff to dampen the sound, but you won't get too good results unless you spend a lot of money.



^FAIL^......... put a few old matteresses around the walls and it will dampen the sound. you dont need to spend a ton of cash anything will do, you just need to stop the sound from bouncing off the walls.
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#5
I heard of a good trick for that, after micing the amp you put a thick blanket over top ther amp and the mic to stop the reverb, it may help
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#6
Quote by kaos572
I heard of a good trick for that, after micing the amp you put a thick blanket over top ther amp and the mic to stop the reverb, it may help


Not a horrible idea, but the sound will be extremely dead. If trying this you may want to add some reverb from a pedal or your amp or even some post-recording reverb during production.
#7
i know this is kind of the opposite of what your looking for, but the Pixies got alot of really cool natural reverb on their first album by recording in a bathroom
#8
Quote by Opethfan1
^FAIL^......... put a few old matteresses around the walls and it will dampen the sound. you dont need to spend a ton of cash anything will do, you just need to stop the sound from bouncing off the walls.


I've heard bad things from a few people about putting mattresses up. I suggest going on youtube and checking out how some people treat their rooms. There's some great cheap ways to do it.
#9
Quote by Dallinisrad
i know this is kind of the opposite of what your looking for, but the Pixies got alot of really cool natural reverb on their first album by recording in a bathroom


Bathrooms always seem to have good reverb, but TS no room in a house will really be sonically dead unless it was built or made that way
#10
If you're just doing one amp, then put mattresses (who has multiple extra mattresses? not me) or something else around just the amp, not the walls of your garage. In my campus's protools studio, we push the movable walls (gobos) around the amp like a fort to kill all the reverb, then add it in post-production.
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#11
Thankyou for all your suggestions....I'm new to this forum and think its awesome.... and I know some things of my own(beginner in most areas though)...I hope I can contribute some advice in the future to others....
#12
for just tracking an amp, you dont need a perfect room. yeah a perfect room would be nice but you generally mic them close enough to where it doesn't matter all that much. you'll want it a lot more dead than most garages are, but putting anything in there will help.

also, keep in mind that live rooms in real studios are not dead. they are normally quite live (or have adjustable liveliness). the difference is it's an even liveliness whereas most untreated rooms naturally accentuate and cancel many different frequencies making a very unpleasant reverb or flutter echoes. you'll only really need to worry about acoustics being a big problem when micing any other instruments (drums, vocals, acoustic instruments...) and especially when mixing. the garage would be the LAST place i would mix in...

anything at all you put in there will break up the sound. mattresses will work, but really, anything will help. i would also try the blanket trick as that will probably deaden it the most if you layer a few blankets over your setup.
#13
My recordings were done in a garage, close mic'd with the cab facing the opposing wall. But I never had trouble getting them to sound tight. Do you have any onboard DSP's biting into your soundcard? some cards have the option to add reverb to EVERYTHING that comes out of the speakers (Audigy, anyone?). if your sound has the option for a global DSP, turn the f*cker OFF.
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