#1
I'm learning notation for guitar (not tablature) and i am learning where the notes are on the neck compared to the position on the piece of notation that i am looking at. I get a lot of it but what i dont get is if my math is correct there is 12 notes that are all "F's" on a 24 fret guitar, but you never see guitar notation or any notation for that matter have like 30 little lines and then a little quarter note symbol. Get what i mean? How do they show the 12th "F" in notation? If you dont get what i mean i can clarify. Thanks guys
#2
If you had to play a note that high, instead of writing a billion ledger lines you'd most likely see an '8va' sign which means to play everything an octave above where it is notated. '8va bassa' means play it an octave lower. I think there are other ways of notating this as well.
(I believe 15ma. is two octaves)
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#3
well for starters 24 fret guitars only span like 3 or 4 octaves octaves i think. so while there are many Fs on a guitar many of them share the same pitch.

example being the 11th fret of the A and the 6th fret of the D share the note G# in the same pitch meaning they will be noted at the same place on a staff.

higher octaves however are shown using a symbol that I think looks like 8va to help save space on sheet music.

but there will never be like 30 ledger lines on a staff that would be going into territory that human ears cannot hear lol
#4
Okay what would guitar notation look like if i wanted to play the 7th fret of the A string? If you cant go up that high with ledger lines and if you didn't need a symbol like 8va what would tell you to play the "E" note on the 7th fret instead of the one that is the open High E string or the Low E string? I guess what i mean is, how do you know which one to play if they cant fit all of the notes with the same pitch on the ledgers? What differentiates notes of the same pitch?
#5
Quote by ac--dc
Okay what would guitar notation look like if i wanted to play the 7th fret of the A string? If you cant go up that high with ledger lines and if you didn't need a symbol like 8va what would tell you to play the "E" note on the 7th fret instead of the one that is the open High E string or the Low E string? I guess what i mean is, how do you know which one to play if they cant fit all of the notes with the same pitch on the ledgers? What differentiates notes of the same pitch?

If they're the same pitch and there is no indication in the music, absolutely nothing. (aside from tone perhaps. Open strings have a harsher sound)

Guitar, unlike many other instruments has repeated pitches. 7th fret A string is the same as second fret D string, but open E isn't the same. Same note, different pitch. Of course middle C and the third space C in treble clef, for example, have different pitches so a middle C isn't the same as any C note you can play. As long as you're getting the pitch correct you should be fine regardless of where it's played.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
Last edited by FacetOfChaos at Sep 1, 2010,
#6
That kind of thing is all up to you. Do what you can play and/or what sounds better. Alot of sheet music isn't notated specifically for guitar, so you can take some liberties. Plus, even if it does specify a string, what's really stopping you from changing it to fit your playing style?
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Last edited by VeilOfMaya at Sep 2, 2010,
#7
Classical guitarists pretty much get off on fingerings to bring out other qualities of the part. Join them.

A C# E on strings 6 5 4 near the 17th fret , same notes as A C# E on strings 3 2 1 in second position. Very different though..
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#8
Quote by ac--dc
Okay what would guitar notation look like if i wanted to play the 7th fret of the A string? If you cant go up that high with ledger lines and if you didn't need a symbol like 8va what would tell you to play the "E" note on the 7th fret instead of the one that is the open High E string or the Low E string? I guess what i mean is, how do you know which one to play if they cant fit all of the notes with the same pitch on the ledgers? What differentiates notes of the same pitch?



this is one of the difficulties of learning to read notation on a multi stringed instrument.

what you have to realize that the same note can be played on multiple strings and would be notated the same. for example, open high e string, 5th fret B string, 9th fret G string, 14th fret D string, 19th fret A string, and 24th fret E string are all the same exact note. the only difference in sound is in tone, which i due to the gauge and tension of the strings.

deciding where to play something depends on the context of what's going on before and after the note in question, as well as the tone, which is really up to you.

as for octaves - on a 24 fret guitar tuned to E standard there are 5 octave of E. one way to play them would be open low E, low E 12th fret, open high E, high E 12th fret, and high E 24th fret. so the lowest E would be under the 3rd ledger down and the highest would be above the 6th ledger.
#9
It's all about context; work out where it would be most practical to play the notes on the fretboard, and if that happens to be several places, trial until you get the best sound.
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