#1
I would like someone to show me something that explains chord/note relations...

Let me explain

I know that I IV V are common chord progressions...but could someone give me some more of these...like how I use suss chords...ie E and A7 give an unfinished/tense progression (something like that I don't know)


If I have a four bar piece in a major or minor key, how do I write the bit that kind of gets higher towards the end but resolves it self back to the original note/chord

I know that a coda is the closing section of a musical composition. But how do I write it?


I'd also like to know when playing solos, lets say in A minor pentatonic and it gets higher and higher are you still in A minor pent? or are you moving to D min pent?

Thanks, I hope that makes sense
Last edited by Tkm at Sep 2, 2010,
#2
you can find almost all of the information you desire in the lessons section.

/thread.
Quote by EndTheRapture51
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#4
Quote by Tkm
I would like someone to show me something that explains chord/note relations...

Let me explain

I know that I IV V are common chord progressions...but could someone give me some more of these...like how I use suss chords...ie E and A7 give an unfinished/tense progression (something like that I don't know)


If I have a four bar piece in a major or minor key, how do I write the bit that kind of gets higher towards the end but resolves it self back to the original note/chord

I know that a coda is the closing section of a musical composition. But how do I write it?

I know that I IV V are common chord progressions...but could someone give me some more of these...like how I use suss chords...ie E and A7 give an unfinished/tense progression (something like that I don't know)

I'd also like to know when playing solos, lets say in A minor pentatonic and it gets higher and higher are you still in A minor pent? or are you moving to D min pent?

Thanks, I hope that makes sense


I see where you're going, but in sincerity you're learning and asking to understand in fragments. What I mean is you need the basics with which to build upon, the things you need to know, need to be reached in context where one well understood idea and attending foundational principles, leads to the next one.

I have offered to mentor people on here. Please click the link below to read about my mentoring program here and send me a PM, and I'll see if I cant get you sorted.

Best,

Sean
#5
Quote by Tkm
I would like someone to show me something that explains chord/note relations...

If I have a four bar piece in a major or minor key, how do I write the bit that kind of gets higher towards the end but resolves it self back to the original note/chord

I know that a coda is the closing section of a musical composition. But how do I write it?

I know that I IV V are common chord progressions...but could someone give me some more of these...like how I use suss chords...ie E and A7 give an unfinished/tense progression (something like that I don't know)

I'd also like to know when playing solos, lets say in A minor pentatonic and it gets higher and higher are you still in A minor pent? or are you moving to D min pent?

Thanks, I hope that makes sense


It's pretty much what the others said above me. We could list progressions and all that jazz, but that's both a lot of work and useless. If you want to just have a couple of progressions you can use, there are dozens of sites and lists that use common progressions. You can find them on the lessons page here, or check out cyberfret.com, and many others.

If you want to actually understand progressions and know how to build them yourself, there is no easy explanation we can put in a few simple posts. If you are interested, read up on cadences and voice leading.

Alternatively, there is a pretty good flowchart on http://tinyurl.com/38rfbtp. It doesnt tell you anything about the how and why, but it's handy nonetheless. Just use it as a crutch or a law of how you should make prog's.. using it will neither guarantee it's any good nor will not following it mean it's bad.

As for your more specific questions.. I'll try and answer them, but dont just take my word for it, the best thing is to research and experiment yourself.

I know that I IV V are common chord progressions...but could someone give me some more of these...like how I use suss chords...ie E and A7 give an unfinished/tense progression (something like that I don't know)


Sus chords are a little different from normal triads in that they dont are without function (in the sense of a progression). That statement isnt really correct btw, but it's hard to explain. Let's just say that a sus2 or sus4 chord has tension that want to resolve to it's own triad or it's 'linked' triad. A E sus2 wants to resolve to E Major or E minor, or possible to B minor or Major because sus chords are a little ambiguous and a sus2 chord could be a different sus4 and vice-versa.
What that means is that you either use the sus chord [i[before the 'stable' triad, or use a sus chord instead of the triad to create unresolved tension. That means that in a certain way, sus chords have the same function as their parent chords in a progression. It's just different in how it sounds or creates / resolves tension.

If I have a four bar piece in a major or minor key, how do I write the bit that kind of gets higher towards the end but resolves it self back to the original note/chord


It either comes down to cadences, or modulating among the circle of fifths.

I know that a coda is the closing section of a musical composition. But how do I write it?


It's partly down to cadences again, but for the most part it's just taking the general music / statement / theme of your main part and cooling it down.. like a reverse intro. yeah, kinda an useless explanation, but it's just like explaining how to write a good solo.. you can be told about which scales you could use, chords, how to modulate, techniques of tapping and legato and bends and what not.. but it still wont work without using your ears and expression. Think about how you would make something sound like it's ending or calming down.. or maybe you need to just take some of the music you feel in awe to, and just listen ?

I'd also like to know when playing solos, lets say in A minor pentatonic and it gets higher and higher are you still in A minor pent? or are you moving to D min pent?


Could just be playing the notes higher, could be moving through the circle of fifths.. it's really up to the composer and individual pieces what and how it happends though.. again, just listen. And maybe try to analyse using tab or sheet and see for yourself what happends. You are basically asking something like "from which country do guitarists come from?"
#6
Quote by From my lesson
Suspended Chords

Suspended chords are an odd type of chord, because they are essential the only ones without the presence of a third. Without a third the chord cannot be labeled as either major or minor; this means the chord has no specific emotion that a major/minor chord acquires. There are two types of suspended chords; 2nd's and 4th's.

[ A B E ] Asus2
1 2 5

[ A D E ] Asus4
1 4 5


Suspended chords are well, suspended, so they are easy to use in progressions and to resolve to other chords, particularly the root. The extended usage of suspended chords is for the suspended note to move a semitone towards the third. So in the provided examples the B in the Asus2 would want to move to a C, creating an Am chord (I'm sure you've seen this used in many songs), and the D in the Asus4 would want to move down to a C#, creating a A major chord. However, suspended chords are now used in many other contexts. For example, you can use the sus4 chord as a IV chord, because it flows easily back to the root considering it contains two of the same notes. (ie. Asus4 [A D E] to D [D F# A ] ). There are many opportunities to use suspended chords because five of the seven notes in a scale have the option of using the natural second or fourth.

Usually a suspended chords only uses the suspended note (2nd or 4th) once, while the the root and fifth are doubled if necessary, just like in the examples given; <x02200>, <02230> or (AEABE) (AEADE). Suspended chords are most commonly constructed in the shape similar to major and minor barre chords. The following are examples of Csus2 <x35533> & Csus4 <35563> chords. You can move these shapes around the guitar neck. You can think of it this way; the suspended second is one note lower that a flat (minor) third and a suspended fourth is one note higher than a (major) third


Here
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