#1
Does William Leavitt's A Modern Method for Guitar (any of the volumes) teach music theory or is it more focused on sight reading?
I want to learn theory and sight read from a book that is focused on guitar, is this one the best choice?
I will talk about tech-death, all the time.
#2
yeah, it's very, very good.
Very deep though and quite heavy... but if you progressively work through it, you'll understand how good it is.
#3
Not in my opinion. The speed it progresses assumes you'll understand it all without question. It's grab on, hang on, and better not fall off. This kind of book might be best with an actual teacher going through it with you.

And definitely not the best for learning to sight read.

Best,

Sean
#4
Quote by Sean0913
Not in my opinion. The speed it progresses assumes you'll understand it all without question. It's grab on, hang on, and better not fall off. This kind of book might be best with an actual teacher going through it with you.

And definitely not the best for learning to sight read.

Best,

Sean


While usually I'm skeptical of guys who sign their names at the end of posts on message boards , he's right.


Not only does it progress fast, but for both theory and sight reading it's not really what you are looking for. If you have some reading skills, the best way to improve is to just read more! Read simple pieces or melodies. Try playing them up a 3rd, 5th, etc. You just need to do it OVER and OVER. Think back to when you were learning to read language. Lots of repetition, noticing patterns.If you lack the basics, there should be TONS of resources online for this sort of thing , google should do it.
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#5
I've browsed through that book quickly and it really seemed like a companion to a lecture. Good book, but not for a total beginner.
#6
For sight reading there's only one book I can fully recommend. Music Reading for Guitar by David Oakes, on Musician Institute Press (Frankly I think everything thing else by MI is self indulgent crap produced under their name to make a buck, but this is the lone exception)

Best,

Sean
#7
the modern method is a guitar method book, meant to help with your knowledge of your instrument and your overall skill. it helps with theory and sightreading, but if you want dedicated theory and sight reading books id recomend either Tonal Theory (standard college textbook, i forgot who its by) and The Jazz Theory Book (Mark Levine) for theory and for sightreadiing Melodic Rhythms for guitar and Sight Reading for Guitar (both by william leavit, to be used together).
#8
I'm mostly looking to learn theory and become advanced and proficient with it, but sight reading would be a plus. Any specific recommendations for those needs?
I've got 4 years experience on guitar so I'm decently technically but i have no background in theory, so i'd need to learn that from the ground up.
I'd prefer to get a book- its just easier for me to learn from them.
I will talk about tech-death, all the time.
#10
Fretboard Mastery by Troy Stetina is quite good. Put that with Music Theory by Tom Kolb and you should have a pretty good grasp of things
#11
Quote by Sean0913
Nope - not a single theory book I can recommend. Maybe someday I'll find one. I've read many of them hoping to find one that I could, because theres definitely a need for a good one.

None of them are, in my opinion.

Best,

Sean


What do you think of Harmony and Voice Leading by Schachter, et al?
#12
Quote by metalheadinjury
I'm mostly looking to learn theory and become advanced and proficient with it, but sight reading would be a plus. Any specific recommendations for those needs?
I've got 4 years experience on guitar so I'm decently technically but i have no background in theory, so i'd need to learn that from the ground up.
I'd prefer to get a book- its just easier for me to learn from them.
I learnt theory when learning the violin and I learnt from the AB guide to music theory (part 1).

It's focussed on clasical music so there might be a few things that are not relevant but all in all it gives a very solid foundation and I found that the things it didn't teach fully (eg. chord construction, chord function) were reasonably easy to learn because I had learn the basics of interval construction, major and minor scales ect. so well from this book.

There are also workbooks you can get which are good as the exercises help to make sure you remember everything that you have read.
#13
Hello metalheadinjury,

I'm learning from Modern Method for Guitar. I can tell based on my experience. I'm really a begginer and is true... sometimes is heavy but most of the time is not. The 1st book comes with a DVD, it has more than 40 hs of instructions and is key to progress. Basically on the DVD it is explained 90% of the things that with the book alone are just impossible to get, like tempo, technique and musical theory. You can play the duets along both parts with the DVD, which is REALLY helpful. I complement that book with a chord book and practicing major, minor and other scales + learning some songs. I'm not interested on improvizing right now as I think I need to improve my technic first.
Hope it helps

Juan


PS: buy a metronome ;-)
#14
Quote by disuse
Fretboard Mastery by Troy Stetina is quite good. Put that with Music Theory by Tom Kolb and you should have a pretty good grasp of things

Do these both cover theory, and what is the difficulty level for the comprehension of the material in the books?

Quote by juanbrein
I'm learning from Modern Method for Guitar. I can tell based on my experience. I'm really a begginer and is true... sometimes is heavy but most of the time is not. The 1st book comes with a DVD, it has more than 40 hs of instructions and is key to progress. Basically on the DVD it is explained 90% of the things that with the book alone are just impossible to get, like tempo, technique and musical theory. You can play the duets along both parts with the DVD, which is REALLY helpful. I complement that book with a chord book and practicing major, minor and other scales + learning some songs. I'm not interested on improvizing right now as I think I need to improve my technic first.
Hope it helps

Juan


PS: buy a metronome ;-)


I have a metronome, its usually how I practice. How heavily does the book cover theory?
I will talk about tech-death, all the time.
#15
It is more focused on sight reading, but it does have some theory. It actually says though that you should not really only on the theory it teaches. it is still a great book though.
Tick tock and waiting for the meteor
This clock is opening another door
#16
At the risk of soundling like a sales pitch, which is not intended:
I came across "Absolutely Understand Guitar". It's a DVD series put out by Scotty West. I was curious so I called the 800 number and asked a few questions. I was AMAZED that it was Scott that answered the phone! The questions I asked, he explained the answers quite well (At the moment I' can't even remember the questions! DUH!). So I ordered his series and am slowly working through it as I am ALSO UN-learning bad habits. (GRR!)
He gets into a lot of theory... Which is good. I also like the way that he presents it because, to me, it makes SENSE! After YEARS of Piano lessons when I was younger, I learned almost NOTHING of Music Theory. Most of my teachers were, "Here's a song, this is how you play it. Now go home and practice it." (No, I'm not kidding. ) I've learned MORE than I ever had before about the "construction" of music. Give it a Google and take a look, even give the guy a call. ANY questions that I've had, I'll email him and I usually get a response with in a day.
Good luck and keep at it!
Joel.
#17
Quote by metalheadinjury


I have a metronome, its usually how I practice. How heavily does the book cover theory?



It is defenetly not at theory book, must be 80% practice, 20 % theroy? Really don't know but not much

Basically there are any kind of exercises:

- Chord progressions
- Duets
- Chord solos
- Solos
- Sight reading exercises
- technic
- scales
- possitions and patters

Basically it covers evertything from the practice point of view... with theory snapshots on each lesson. Again... get the DVD... it is key
#18
Quote by KingStill
What do you think of Harmony and Voice Leading by Schachter, et al?


Don't recall reading that...

I've gone through

Harmony - by Walter Piston
Harmony Theory and Voicing by Willmot
Music Theory by Cappuzzio
Music Theory for Dummies
HL Music Theory
Harmony and Theory by Wyatt and Schroeder
Jazz Theory - Mark Levine

Just to name a few which come to mind

on UG I've gone through the Ultimate Guide.. The best on UG IMO
The Crusades - laughingly overrated
and I've looked through Mike Dodge's website, which is probably the best free resource out there

Of course I have Modern Method as well as the huge Computer CD
I'm very familiar with Troy Stetina and respect him but he doesnt really teach much theory in the Fretboard Mastery series.

Also keep in mind I did all this from the other side...that of having a solid grasp of music theory, so I already understood it, but I understood and learned it over a 12 year period in which I ultimately taught myself...so I could understand it.

None of these books makes the study of theory easy or clear. I know it can be done because I do it every day..

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Sep 4, 2010,
#19
hi guys, i've been playing guitar for 6 months now.....i've been doing good till a few days back i started practicing a lamb of god song, its tabbed version...
2-3-1 2-3-0 2-3 2-3-1 2-3-0 6-5 on the 6th string
PROBLEMS--->>
1. my hand hurts like hell after 2 min
2.my wrist is perpendicular to my palm
3.thumb position?...perpendicular to the strings....i use the MIDDLE part of my thumb for the required pressure if i use the TIP it doesnt hurt that much but im not used to it

please help me with these.....i used internet for learning so dont have a teacher to ask to..thanks
#20
Quote by lamb of dog
hi guys, i've been playing guitar for 6 months now.....i've been doing good till a few days back i started practicing a lamb of god song, its tabbed version...
2-3-1 2-3-0 2-3 2-3-1 2-3-0 6-5 on the 6th string
PROBLEMS--->>
1. my hand hurts like hell after 2 min
2.my wrist is perpendicular to my palm
3.thumb position?...perpendicular to the strings....i use the MIDDLE part of my thumb for the required pressure if i use the TIP it doesnt hurt that much but im not used to it

please help me with these.....i used internet for learning so dont have a teacher to ask to..thanks


Probably the wrong topic to be asking this in, but for the sake of being helpful I'll respond. The pain in your hand is only going to go away with time, assuming you don't force it, but with time difficult guitar parts WILL get easier in terms of physical endurance. Your wrist should be perpendicular to your fingers i suppose, but keep it loose and relaxed, not rigid or tense. Your thumb, assuming we're talking about the face of it that has your fingertip, should be parallel to the strings, not perpendicular. If the neck of your guitar wasn't there, you should be able to touch your thumb to your fingers and be making a 'money-rubbing' position with your hand. There's no pressure required on the back of the neck from your thumb, that could be what's making your hands hurt. Keep everything loose and relaxed! Undue tension serves only to impede your progress and wear out your arms and hands.
#21
Quote by nightwind
While usually I'm skeptical of guys who sign their names at the end of posts on message boards , he's right.


Not only does it progress fast, but for both theory and sight reading it's not really what you are looking for. If you have some reading skills, the best way to improve is to just read more! Read simple pieces or melodies. Try playing them up a 3rd, 5th, etc. You just need to do it OVER and OVER. Think back to when you were learning to read language. Lots of repetition, noticing patterns.If you lack the basics, there should be TONS of resources online for this sort of thing , google should do it.

I'm glad I'm not the only one.

Sean, have you ever read Tonal Harmony by Stefan Kostka? That's what I learned out of in AP Music Theory.
#22
hey thanks a lot mate..... one last thing.....is playing with thumb perpendicular gonna slow me down cause im used to it now....or should i change to parallel mode....cause i want to play metal only......
#23
Quote by lamb of dog
hey thanks a lot mate..... one last thing.....is playing with thumb perpendicular gonna slow me down cause im used to it now....or should i change to parallel mode....cause i want to play metal only......

I know I'm not Instrumetal, but I can help.

I'd say that classical position (parallel) is more comfortable, but I can't really say if it necessarily makes you play faster. I strongly prefer it, since my hands are a little smaller than average, and thus wrapping my thumb around the neck makes me cramp easily.

Also, I find that limiting yourself to one genre can seriously inhibit your musical growth. Which is why I listen to (and play) almost everything.

I'm not surprised "Now You've Got Something to Die For" made you cramp up, though. Maybe you should do some warmups?
Last edited by Holy Katana at Sep 6, 2010,