#1
Hey!

The question is in the title basically. What I want to know, is that if youre fretboard looks dry, your obviously oiling it. BUT when doing so, is it possible to do harm to the fretboard by putting too much oil on it?

Because I wondered today while oiling my fretboard. I put a drop of fretboard juice on each fret (not the fret, but space, you know) and when I wiped it over from fret 1 to 24, after doing 24, the first ones oil had been sucked into the wood.

So thats what made me think, shouldve I put more?

Cheers
Jonathan
#2
Guitar wood is meant to be dry and not look oiled. Conditioning the fretboard with oil should be done by applying a couple of drops to a clean rag and working it into the frets, & removing excess a little goes a LONG way.
Moving on.....
#3
Ok thanks.

But is it okay the way I do, like just a drop on each space and then wipe it. Nearly all of the rest are stuck on the cloth. After each space there is a lil oily looking shiny surface, but not really like you could see any real access of oil. Then after all fret spaces there isnt much left, but if there is Ill wipe it away.

Is that an acceptable method?
#4
Quote by KenG
Guitar wood is meant to be dry and not look oiled. Conditioning the fretboard with oil should be done by applying a couple of drops to a clean rag and working it into the frets, & removing excess a little goes a LONG way.



What ken said. Guitar wood is ment to be dry (Thats why it's kelm dried) A little is fine, but don't over do it.
#5
You should only have to condition the fretboard once every other year or so, if that much. And then when you condition it, only put a few drops along the entire length of the board. It is possible to overoil a fretboard and I've repaired guitars that have been overoiled. The frets can work loose because the wood is softer and more pliable from the excess oil.

The only way to fix an overoiled fretboard is the same method as removing excess oil from when you condition it in the first place. Take a clean cloth and keep wiping down the whole fretboard. Change your spot on the cloth and keep wiping. You're done when the cloth doesn't pick up anymore oil and it doesn't discolor from oil when you wipe vigorously
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#6
You should only condition your board when you change strings....shoot maybe every 2-3 times really. Depends on how much you play.
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#7
Quote by Tig-O-bitties
What ken said. Guitar wood is ment to be dry (Thats why it's kelm dried) A little is fine, but don't over do it.


You mean kiln? Fair enough, but some woods are oilier than others naturally. If it's dripping, that's bad...

As long as it doesn't look dry and about to crack, you should be fine.
#9
ok, I just oiled my ibby (the OP was about my LTD). I bought the ibby used (a 2004) the day before yesturday. The fretboard looked srsly dry and dull, with major gaps (not gaps the the little "cracks" that are in the wood, naturally.) so I thought it would be a good idea to oil it, and thats why I wasnt so saving with the oil. definately didnt overoil it but not underoiling either (probably) because the gaps were so big, especially after the 24th fret, and the very end of the fretboard.