#1
Brothers! I'm hoping some others on their journey here could share anything in their musical histories that has been really "inspiring" . Not so much inspiring, but of things that opened up avenvue(s) of new thinking for them.

My two most recent things are a book by Nicholas Slonimsky called Thesaurus of Scales and Melodic Patterns. Though I'm sure much of the rehearsed Jazzers know this, what I really love of this book is how absolutely raw the data is , that it leaves you will so much to be able to get out of it if you put in. Trying all those patterns over different keys and chords and coming up with any harmonies you can is very fun. I'm about 1/4 of the way through doing it front to back very very slowly. It's great.

The other is a guy named Ben Monder. What an absolute beauty writer and player. His solo guitar stuff has caused me to spend lots of time this past month trying to play poly rhythms on the guitar and his harmonic ideas are just above anything else I've heard in this "genre".

Maybe there are others who will find pleasure in these and be glad for it. Do your best to pay me back with your own nuggets.
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#2
For me it was narrowing down my playing ideas by focusing on select and intentional notes within a chord progression. Playing through the changes, changed the way I "heard" music. Since I know every chord and every note in every chord, it's a lot of fun to say, hmm lets see what happens if I target...

The thesaurus of melodic patterns is a great resource for busting ruts and ideas, not to mention what it might do if you apply it to arpeggio tones. There's an online version of this idea here:

http://www.zentao.com/guitar/patterns/

I think just listening to good players and then being able to break down what they did, and why it seemed to catch the ear, goes a long way also. Robben Ford and Larry Carlton are great players that I like to do this with. On UG I really respect a guy here named evolucian, for his melodic sense in his playing.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Sep 2, 2010,