#1
I've been messing around with this new chord progression lately and I was wondering if I should play the Lydian scale over it. Here is the progression...

G major for 4 beats
D major 7 for 4 beats
A major for 4 beats
E minor for 2 beats
F# minor for 2 beats

So as you can see the chords fit in to D major but I was wondering if I should play a G Lydian scale over the progression because it starts on G major. I made the D into a maj7 chord to try and emphasize the #4 in the Lydian scale. Is this a good way to try and solidify which mode to use? I guess basically I'm wonder what the deciding factors are for choosing which mode to use. Is it the first chord in the progression? Does it depend on seventh chords or other chords that emphasize certain notes in the mode?
#2
The chord you start with has nothing to due with the scale you should use over top. It depends heavily on the progression, since your A is a major and not a minor once you sound that chord you're no longer in G. Same with the F# minor, it needs to change to F# diminished to stay in key.

A G major progression is as follows;

GM, Am, Bm, CM, DM, Em, F#dim, GM (Octave higher or same)

So if you change those chords previously mentiond you can play w/e mode you want over top. I sugguest an A dorian. Everyone likes dorians, Kirk Hammet for one.
Everything is divisible by metal- Michael Angel Batio
#3
Quote by Wing00
The chord you start with has nothing to due with the scale you should use over top. It depends heavily on the progression, since your A is a major and not a minor once you sound that chord you're no longer in G. Same with the F# minor, it needs to change to F# diminished to stay in key.

A G major progression is as follows;

GM, Am, Bm, CM, DM, Em, F#dim, GM (Octave higher or same)

So if you change those chords previously mentiond you can play w/e mode you want over top. I sugguest an A dorian. Everyone likes dorians, Kirk Hammet for one.


Ha Ha I know the chords that are in G major. I like the way the progression is now but I was wondering if I should play out of a different mode other than D Ionian.
#4
Well to that I say; Ionians are usually predictable and uninteresting, make it vibrant if you stick with an Ionan.
Everything is divisible by metal- Michael Angel Batio
#5
Quote by cgwalls
I've been messing around with this new chord progression lately and I was wondering if I should play the Lydian scale over it. Here is the progression...

G major for 4 beats
D major 7 for 4 beats
A major for 4 beats
E minor for 2 beats
F# minor for 2 beats

So as you can see the chords fit in to D major but I was wondering if I should play a G Lydian scale over the progression because it starts on G major. I made the D into a maj7 chord to try and emphasize the #4 in the Lydian scale. Is this a good way to try and solidify which mode to use? I guess basically I'm wonder what the deciding factors are for choosing which mode to use. Is it the first chord in the progression? Does it depend on seventh chords or other chords that emphasize certain notes in the mode?


I see what you are doing here, but under this scenario, you are merely playing a scale that you identify as "Lydian" which simply has the function of G Major. The D with the F# is the #4 in G, But you played A which wants to resolve to D. You simply started with a IV I Cadence.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Sep 3, 2010,
#6
Quote by cgwalls
I've been messing around with this new chord progression lately and I was wondering if I should play the Lydian scale over it. Here is the progression...

G major for 4 beats
D major 7 for 4 beats
A major for 4 beats
E minor for 2 beats
F# minor for 2 beats

So as you can see the chords fit in to D major but I was wondering if I should play a G Lydian scale over the progression because it starts on G major. I made the D into a maj7 chord to try and emphasize the #4 in the Lydian scale. Is this a good way to try and solidify which mode to use? I guess basically I'm wonder what the deciding factors are for choosing which mode to use. Is it the first chord in the progression? Does it depend on seventh chords or other chords that emphasize certain notes in the mode?


Well, it's not a lydian progression, and it's really not a functional Major progression either. It's a group of chords in the key signature of D/Bm. If you were to solo over it, the D Major scale would probably be your best bet.

I think it would do you some good to study the concept of chord function,and spend plenty of time listening and learning to recognize it in music.

Then come back to making chord progressions. Focus on Major and minor before getting into the modes.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Sep 3, 2010,
#9
Also I read somewhere about a deceptive cadence where the V chord can go to a vi chord instead of the I chord which is exactly what happens here right? You said the A chord wants to resolve to D but can't it go to the vi as well?

Edit: Ignore what I said here. The E minor is not the vi chord in G major. I guess I was thinking in G major when I wrote this.
Last edited by cgwalls at Sep 3, 2010,
#10
Quote by cgwalls
Also I read somewhere about a deceptive cadence where the V chord can go to a vi chord instead of the I chord which is exactly what happens here right? You said the A chord wants to resolve to D but can't it go to the vi as well?



Well it's called deceptive for a reason : P

A doesn't really resolve to F#, you are just kind of putting it there.
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#12
^ Read what Sean or Guitar Munky said about functions and resolutions.

Basically, you don't really have anagrams in music like you do language, just because they have the same notes doesn't make them the same word sort of thing.
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#13
Quote by nightwind
^ Read what Sean or Guitar Munky said about functions and resolutions.

Basically, you don't really have anagrams in music like you do language, just because they have the same notes doesn't make them the same word sort of thing.

Ah I see. I just read the replies in more detail.
Believe it or not I just learned a lot from this thread haha
#14
Quote by nightwind
Well it's called deceptive for a reason : P

A doesn't really resolve to F#, you are just kind of putting it there.

What do you mean F#? Oops I was thinking in G major and I forgot that E minor was not the vi chord in this situation. Sorry just ignore what I said. I think you misunderstood what I was trying to say though. I was wondering if it resolved to Em not F# minor. I now realize that it doesn't.

Quote by piszczel
Wouldn't E minor scale work over this as well?

No the chords are from D major not G.