#1
How does one know, in a I IV V progession, which chords are to be minor and major, and does this effect which pentatonic scale is to be played over them?

For example, if I wanted to play some 12 bar blues in E, would any of the chords, E, A, or B be minor?

Or if I wanted to play in B, would B, E, or F# be minor?

And how do I know to tell which ones are major/minor?


What got me to wondering is that I was playing with some backing tracks and sometimes it might be a song in A, and the next song would be in.. Bm or something. So, here I am.
#2
In the key of E Major; E, A, and B would all be major. In the key of B Major; B, E, and F# would also be major.

The one, four, and five chords are the major chords in major keys.
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#3
Well in the 12 bar blues the chords are all seventh chords. But like if you were in the key of C major the I IV and V chords would all be major. Take a look at the key signature and the notes in the chords. Let's say we are in A major. All the C's, F's, and G's are sharp. The notes in the V chord (E) are E, B, and G#. If we made the E chord minor then that would make the G# in the chord G natural which wouldn't fit the key signature.
#4
In a major key the I, IV and V chords are major. The ii, iii, vi chords are minor.
#5
Okay cool. I learned something new today

So does the same apply to minor, then?

That is, if we were playing 12 bar in, say, Dm.. then the D, G, and A would all be minor, sort of backwards to how major works?
#6
Well usually you don't use minor chords in the 12 bar blues.
Last edited by cgwalls at Sep 3, 2010,
#8
Quote by cgwalls
Well usually you don't use minor chords in the 12 bar blues.



I think 12 bar blues is more of a form.

If someone said we are doing a 12 bar in A minor, I would assume Am Dm Em/EM . Lots of examples in the fakebook.
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#9
There are loads of 12 bar blue, both major an minor, as well as jazz infused 12 bar blues.

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#10
I think you need to go and study some theory. Diatonically the I, IV and V chords in Major Keys are always major.
#11
Short answer: In a vanilla Major scale, the I - IV - V chords are always Major. ii - iii - vi is always minor. vii* is always dimminished.

Longer answer: You write down the notes of the scale, starting on the tonic / name giver. You make chords using those notes by taking the root and the third after that, and another third.
(You can make a 7th chord by taking yet another third after that.) For example, the chord from the tonic in C Major would be C, (skip D) E, (skip F) G. And if you skip the A and put in a B you get a Major 7th. Same for other chords, the V chord would be G (a) B (c) D. Wheter or not the chords are major minor or whatever depends on the intervals between the notes. G Major = G B D = 2 steps between 1st and 3rd and 1 1/2 step between 3rd and 5th. G minor = G bB D = 1 1/2 step between 1st and 3rd and 2 steps between 3rd and 5th, and so on.
#12
The way to work out basic triads in every key:

Figure out your key based on the whole/half step system. (can be found online)

Example, key of C Major = C D E F G A B C

EVERY major key follows the same patterns of major and minor chords.

The pattern is: major, minor, minor, major, major, minor, diminished.

So we know we have Cmaj, Dm, Em, Fmaj, Gmaj, Bdim.

Now, each type of chord has it's own 'formula' based off ITS OWN PARENT SCALE.

Major scales are 1, 3, 5th degrees of the parent scale. So Cmaj would be C E G.

Minor scales are 1, FLAT 3, 5th degrees of the parent scale.

To figure this out you need to know the D Major scale: D E F# G A B C# D

Therefore the 1, FLAT 3, 5 of a Dm chord is D F A.

This works for every chord in the key of C.

So if i was to say 'What notes are contained in the Em chord?' would you know how to respond?
#13
Quote by Rvn
Okay cool. I learned something new today

So does the same apply to minor, then?

That is, if we were playing 12 bar in, say, Dm.. then the D, G, and A would all be minor, sort of backwards to how major works?


Sure does. I can do a simplified Thrill is Gone doing it that way - but it helps make it sound better as min 7ths than straight minors.

This progression fleshed out can use a maj 7th as well, and a 7#9 in the resolve, but I can play a simple 3 chord approximation of the same idea.

Best,

Sean
#14
I agree with everyone's posts here. Usually blues don't have minor chords, but that's most likley due to the person strumming them not knowing how to make them work with eachother. And there are great examples of it on the good old interwebs. But at the same time--- not to insult you here or anything, but learning about the difference between V and v is weeks maybe months into music rudements... You should consider studying for a while before worrying about chord progressions to much. Just some advice.
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#15
Hmm even more info to take in. My brain is gonna asplode! :P

Thanks everyone
#16
Quote by GilbertsPinky
So if i was to say 'What notes are contained in the Em chord?' would you know how to respond?


(1)E (b3)B (5)G

like that? :3
Last edited by Rvn at Sep 3, 2010,
#17
Ok, blues progression in minor is extremely common >_< , I've been playing several this week.

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#18
Quote by Rvn
(1)E (b3)B (5)G

like that? :3



You have the right notes, but the wrong way?

E (b3)G (5)B


Just count one, skip one


E F# G A B
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#19
Quote by Sean0913
Sure does. I can do a simplified Thrill is Gone doing it that way - but it helps make it sound better as min 7ths than straight minors.

This progression fleshed out can use a maj 7th as well, and a 7#9 in the resolve, but I can play a simple 3 chord approximation of the same idea.

Best,

Sean


It's funny that you mentioned the thrill is gone, because it was this video that spawned this whole thread. lol

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aH1kujMBEg4
Last edited by Rvn at Sep 3, 2010,
#20
Quote by nightwind
You have the right notes, but the wrong way?

E (b3)G (5)B


Just count one, skip one


E F# G A B



Good point, i mixed them up. I'm going to blame the fact that i haven't slept from insomnia all night.

Thank you though, because i would have reread my post and got confused lol!
#21
Quote by Rvn
Good point, i mixed them up. I'm going to blame the fact that i haven't slept from insomnia all night.

Thank you though, because i would have reread my post and got confused lol!


It's all good man, even Sean baby mixes up IV and vi sometimes
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