#1
I have written an article which is currently getting decent ratings on the subject of fretboard memorisation. The article touches on my methods of remembering notes on the neck, through use of finding octaves and unisons.
However, I still struggle to memorise scale locations throughout the fretboard; i can't find a solid method which can plant these scales into my brain.
I know block patterns to most modes fluently, and can expand them easily. However, i find it tricky to expland on unless im following the scale almost directly, which can sound unwanted, or if i take a pause to find a new spot in the scale, which can be bad for improv.

I know that looking at scales can heavily require recognition of SHAPE rather than NOTE, but also that knowledge of the notes in scales can definately help detect these shapes. I jsut dont know an efficient method to memorise this.

Any suggestions please?
#2
Try the single string method. Take the a minor scale (A B C D E F G) . Practice going from a to b to c and so on single strings. Eventually try combining it with string skipping, legato, etc.
#3
Quote by malmsteensolo
Try the single string method. Take the a minor scale (A B C D E F G) . Practice going from a to b to c and so on single strings. Eventually try combining it with string skipping, legato, etc.


A guy called Malmsteensolo can't be wrong on that sort thing lol. I'll give it a go man thanks for the tip
#4
Quote by dragozan

I know that looking at scales can heavily require recognition of SHAPE rather than NOTE, but also that knowledge of the notes in scales can definately help detect these shapes. I jsut dont know an efficient method to memorise this.

Any suggestions please?

Get a fret board chart of the scale you want to memorize. Spend some time each day practicing with the chart in front of you. Stare at the chart while you practice.

Even better - loop a backing chord or progression as you practice... this way you are memorizing the scale notes location, but also learning how it all sounds and feels in context. You'll get a lot more bang for your buck musically that way.

If it's too much at first... break it into smaller chunks and focus on only a part of the scale for that day. Also learn the linear patterns up and down strings as mentioned above. Thats really important.

Even 15 minutes a day of this is very effective.
#5
If you are remembering notes on the neck through the use of octaves and unisons, then why not continue to use the other intervals for other notes on the neck?
#6
Visualze scales around the chord shapes:

Mixolydian - Dominant 7th
Major - Maj 7th
Minor - Min 7th
Diminished - Dim 7th

All the scales fit to some extent around those chords.
#7
Quote:
Originally Posted by malmsteensolo
Try the single string method. Take the a minor scale (A B C D E F G) . Practice going from a to b to c and so on single strings. Eventually try combining it with string skipping, legato, etc.


A guy called Malmsteensolo can't be wrong on that sort thing lol. I'll give it a go man thanks for the tip


I agree that thisd was the method that worked for me. I spent the time and memorized the shapes of each mode, but I later found that learning each string, from the lowest note to the twelfth fret, in just one key made it much easier. for example I started on the low E (6th) string in the key of G Major (G A B C D E F#):

e |-------------------------
B |-------------------------
G |-------------------------
D |-------------------------
A |-------------------------
E |-0-2-3-5-7-8-10-12-

I used this to see the patern in which the notes sat along the string. The other great thing is that the 1st and 6th string are exactly the same. this made it easy to figure out where i could move my fingers to when i hit these sections. It made it so that if i ended up on the second fret of the 1st string, I knew I could slide up to the tenth fret.I also found that learning the spaces between notes heading up or down the fret board as opposed to across the fret board. I found that trying to use a simple single string solo technique on each string helped me learn it. I've tabbed it out for the key of G, The first key I learned, (I just condensed it to one tab because I'm lazy and didn't feel like doing six different tabs, I mean I'm not writing an entire lesson)just pick one string and fallow the pattern up then down:

e |-2-0-0-3-0-0-5-0-0-7-0-0-8-0-0-10-0-0-12-0-0----
B |-1-0-0-3-0-0-5-0-0-7-0-0-8-0-0-10-0-0-12-0-0----
G |-2-0-0-4-0-0-5-0-0-7-0-0-9-0-0-11-0-0-12-0-0----
D |-2-0-0-4-0-0-5-0-0-7-0-0-9-0-0-10-0-0-12-0-0----
A |-2-0-0-3-0-0-5-0-0-7-0-0-9-0-0-10-0-0-12-0-0----
E |-2-0-0-3-0-0-5-0-0-7-0-0-8-0-0-10-0-0-12-0-0----

This wont work in every Key, for example the Key of F Maj. because of the Bb, hitting the open 2nd string would not help you learn, but it works just fine for the Keys of Cmaj Gmaj and Dmaj.

I hope this helps, It worked for me, and I can now play up and down and across the fret board in pretty much any key on command.