#1
I decided to post on this thread as a recommendation from another user so I'll try to explain my situation the best I can:

I recently purchased an agile intrepid pro 8 string which is tuned to F#

I actively record and I recognize that bass has a lot to do with the beefiness in metal recordings (at least on some good records, others you cant hear the damn thing at all!)

so likewise I would like to get a bass that can also play in F# to get some super low end for my recordings

I originally posted a question about how to get a bass down to F# and a few different problems came up..the most important being that it's very hard to hear a bass tuned to such a low/high frequency at least the F#

My initial plan was to run the bass I decided on through a sansamp via DI method and record through cubase..

what is it I can do to ensure a good low end with minimal issues..how are super low basses recorded?

Is there something special that is done to provide tonality of the bass?

I would appreciate any and all help/suggestions

Thanks!
Death..Is Just The Beginning..
#2
I know its not what your looking for.. but I know Meshuggah's bassist uses a 5 string tuned to something along the lines of drop Asharp.. so he has the Asharp then F string. Uses the lower A sharp string for their old 7 string material, and when they play their 8 string songs he uses the higher F string.

This also means he gets a pretty badass tone rather than just all out low end.
So yeah, the less hassle method I'd say is experiment with drop B tuning on your bass, its always worth a try
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#3
Quote by Bigaxmax
I know its not what your looking for.. but I know Meshuggah's bassist uses a 5 string tuned to something along the lines of drop Asharp.. so he has the Asharp then F string. Uses the lower A sharp string for their old 7 string material, and when they play their 8 string songs he uses the higher F string.

This also means he gets a pretty badass tone rather than just all out low end.
So yeah, the less hassle method I'd say is experiment with drop B tuning on your bass, its always worth a try

thanks for suggestion, I'm open to anything..I had considered doing some type of octave thing too where I just tune to F# from standard..but IDK how the outcome would be...
Death..Is Just The Beginning..
#4
I don't think the F# below the regular E of a bass would add much content to a recording. I think you'd be better off doing unison riffs with the bass and trying some sort of sub bass addition if you want the super-low frequencies. If you're still set on trying, and I'd hate to see the gauge string you'd have to use for F#, you have to be super tight. The slightest timing discrepancy and the whole thing will turn to mush.
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#5
the simple answer is, you dont!

but in all seriousness, when you go that low, your really getting towards the lowest spectrums of human hearing, and pretty much all youd hear would be the clank against the string, or the oomph (if your listening through a sub-woofer) What id recommend is what others have recommended. Mess around with bass string tunings. You can get a 5 string bass and just play in the same octave as the guitar (bass will still produce much better bass frequencies then a guitar.) you can get a 4 string bass for songs youll be using the 8 string and tune the bass *up* (F#,B,E,A) youll just have to mess around and experiment.
#6
+1 to this^ guy

I've heard that Meshuggah's bass is in the same octave as the guitars.

Also, do not underestimate the importance of a high pass on the guitars when actually mixing. just because they are tuned low doesn't mean they need domination over the subs. That is your territory.
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#7
dont bother getting an octave lower than the F# on an 8-string guitar. It sounds flubby, muddy and unclear. Believe me, I've tried.

Just do what the guy from Meshuggah does and tune to the same octave as the guitar, the sound is much better, and gives you a nice growl instead of a big fart.

EDIT: that being said, there are very few loudspeakers built to produce such low frequencies. Even with a 5-string bass, on the low B, if you're playing through most amps you wont hear the lowest frequencies that it produces.
Last edited by CoreysMonster at Sep 4, 2010,
#8
Quote by Th6r6a6sH
+1 to this^ guy

I've heard that Meshuggah's bass is in the same octave as the guitars.

Also, do not underestimate the importance of a high pass on the guitars when actually mixing. just because they are tuned low doesn't mean they need domination over the subs. That is your territory.

yea +1 to high passing/removing the low end of the guitars. Woofy guitars sound like shit and will really mess up your sound. Once again, leave bass to the bass guitar.

and not to plug myself but heres a quick 30 second clip i did in drop E (1 whole step below the F# on your guitar) with the a 4 string bass in the same octave.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/page_songInfo.cfm?bandID=971601&songID=8662159

the bass is played in the same octave as the guitars (although i put a touch too much grit on the bass, i prefer clean bass usually with a bit of grit, but this is from a while ago)
#9
Quote by MetalBass 77
yea +1 to high passing/removing the low end of the guitars. Woofy guitars sound like shit and will really mess up your sound. Once again, leave bass to the bass guitar.

and not to plug myself but heres a quick 30 second clip i did in drop E (1 whole step below the F# on your guitar) with the a 4 string bass in the same octave.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/page_songInfo.cfm?bandID=971601&songID=8662159

the bass is played in the same octave as the guitars (although i put a touch too much grit on the bass, i prefer clean bass usually with a bit of grit, but this is from a while ago)


you guys are referring to the "same octave" not quite catching what you guys mean there..any way you could elaborate on that a bit more?
Death..Is Just The Beginning..
#10
Quote by DiamondOfBlood
you guys are referring to the "same octave" not quite catching what you guys mean there..any way you could elaborate on that a bit more?

alright think like this, a bass is one octave below a guitar. the low e string on a guitar is one octave higer than the lowest string on a bass, so if you play the 7th fret on a, or 2nd fret on d etc... on a bass, it is one octave up from the lowest string on the bass, hence it is the same octave as the guitar.Now what i was saying for the F# is instead of going down more, tune up the e string on the bass, so that they will be the same octave. does that help?