#1
Ok, it all started off with my trying to lower the action... I wasn't sure what "normal" was so I tinkererd about a bit.

Then I thought that maybe the bridge plate thing on the front of the guitar was resting on the wood (the bit near the straplock) so I convinced myself that it should not be that way so I took off the cover on the back and I loosened the two screws on the claw (i think thats what its called idk, its the bit that holds one end of the springs)

That didnt help too much and I didnt want to loosen them any more cos I got them out about 1cm and I'm not sure how long they are.

So then I decided to remove the middle one of the 3 springs.

I also tightened the screws that are kind of infront and under the saddles, but not the ones that are actually on the saddles.

I dont know what I'm doing, I shouldnt messed with it in the first place.
My action is still high, I only have 2 springs in the bridge, I have thick guage strings, and the bridge plate thing on the front is kind of floating.

Btw, its a fake Stratocaster, a really bad one.

Is it bad to only have two springs?
I never use the whammy anyway.
Any help is appreciated
#2
If you never use the trem, block it off. Then it would be just like a hardtail guitar. I'm sure there's a thread somewhere around here about it, or you can just look up videos on YouTube and such.

"Blocking a tremolo" I'm sure you'll find one that would help you. If you don't want to block the bridge, don't mess with it further and take it to a shop.
#3
if your bridge is now floating, your intonation is now off. usually, if you arent using your whammy bar, the bridge is tight against the body. this helps sustain, and tuning stability. just losen the strings, put your springs back on, tighten the claw, and retune. check and adjust the intonation. do a search on the proper intonation procedure.
to lower the action, you need to use a small allen wrench to losen the two screws on each saddle. you should also check the neck releif at this point. lowering the saddles will cause a change in intonation, so make sure you recheck and adjust accordingly. finally, you may want to adjust your pickup heights. if you lower the action too much, your pickups may be significantly closer to the strings. this could cause a change in tone/volume.
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#4
Thanks chagmaier and TheAbsentOne,

I will block off the trem like you said.

But for lowering the action, I have already lowered the saddles really low,
I recently replaced the nut, could that have anything to do with it? Should I file the nut down some more?
#5
Quote by HyeSOADfreak
Thanks chagmaier and TheAbsentOne,

I will block off the trem like you said.

But for lowering the action, I have already lowered the saddles really low,
I recently replaced the nut, could that have anything to do with it? Should I file the nut down some more?


Until you block it, in the meantime, put all your springs back on and tighten your screws to pull the bridge tight to the body (not crazy tight!).

Along with the other things suggested, you can google some info on guitar set up.

To check your nut height, fret the string at the second fret on the body side (really 3rd fret, but we're looking backwards). So you should have the nut, the first fret being slightly cleared by the string, and the string is fretted at the second fret (backwards). If you google this, there might be some diagrams if you don't get what I'm trying to explain. Anyway, the measurement from the first fret to underside of the string according to Fender specs should be .02 inches. Thats one spec. Personally I like a .010 treble expanding to .015 on the bass side.

Oh, and for action, again using a Fender Strat spec, you should fret the first fret and measure string height to fret at the 17th fret. This should be about 4/64 on the treble e.

If you are at least in the ballpark with these, you've done some good tinkering!
Water which is too pure has no fish - Ts'ai Ken T'an
Last edited by Ratraisin at Sep 3, 2010,
#6
If you want the bridge floating you have to balance the string tension against the trem spring tension. If it is a standard (vintage) 6 screw trem. The recommended Fender setting is 1/8 of an inch above the body at the back of the trem plate as measured from the base of the trem plate. The 6 screws at the front are not meant to be screwed down all the way. With the strings loosened screw them down till they hit the top of the trem plate then back the inner 4 off two to three turns and back the outer 2 off only far enough so that the 2 outer screws are not being moved when you do a complete downward push on the vibrato bar. After you have this adjustment done then you must redo the intonation of your guitar. Here is a place that can help you do that as I'm not up to giving Strat intonation lessons tonight.....

http://www.projectguitar.com/tut/intonate.htm

Edit: Also note that it can take some time to learn to set the intonation of your floating trem guitar while at the same time adjusting the action height.
Last edited by sparkeyjames at Sep 3, 2010,