#1
Hello. I understand modes and relative major and minors. Along with that i know my major scale (not just box positions) throughout the neck. I have created some fancy licks and am really starting to be able to playing things on the major scale second nature. I can play it in all keys and have good improv with it. I also know one box position for all my modes and minor scale. However i know my major scale a lot better and can play it around the neck (like i said before). Couldn't i not have to memorize the minor scale positions? i could just play c major and just emphasize the A notes? Or if i wanted to play Dorian couldn't i just emphasize the d notes? to people actually memorize those scales throughout the neck or do they do what im talking about?
#2
Hello. I understand modes and relative major and minors.


By the sound of it, you don't, it seems like you understand the SHAPE and positions on the neck but dont get the real nitty gritty of it, like notes in each scale in each key, the intervalic relationship between each note, how each sounds over which chord

I can play it in all keys and have good improv with it. I also know one box position for all my modes and minor scale


Its a good start, but learn the notes for each and find your own shapes, that way you get a better grasp on the scale itself and can use it all over the neck - not just in one place

Couldn't i not have to memorize the minor scale positions? i could just play c major and just emphasize the A notes? Or if i wanted to play Dorian couldn't i just emphasize the d notes? to people actually memorize those scales throughout the neck or do they do what im talking about?


In C major, there is only one A note...A

The sixth mode of the major scale, Aeolian is natural minor and while you could "emphasize" the A, as you say, that would be pointless as the notes in Aeolian which give it its function are the flat 3, 6 and 7

Just like "emphasizing" Dorian in C would imply emphasizing the natural 6 in the Dorian. But thats just getting complicated.

Its obvious you dont understand modes and you should check out the modes sticky
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


Quote by Holy Katana

How dare you attack the greatness of the augmented sixth?
#3
In short, yes.
This is particularly helpful when you know the major scale all over the guitar neck.
You can use the major scale pattern that shares the notes with whatever you're really playing in. If you've got an A minor progression, you can play the C major scale pattern but be aware that you're actually playing in A minor. The chord progression should keep the tonic where it is. You wouldn't have to emphasize it any more than you would if you were playing the A minor scale pattern.

If you're playing over an F# Phrygian vamp, you could use the D major scale pattern. But be aware you're actually using F# Phrygian.

I use this technique myself.

That being said, make sure you definitely understand modes. If you do, you should be able to explain why each one has a sound that is very different from a normal major or minor scale, and you should be able to play using them correctly in order to get their unique sound.
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#4
Quote by Tominator_1991
By the sound of it, you don't, it seems like you understand the SHAPE and positions on the neck but dont get the real nitty gritty of it, like notes in each scale in each key, the intervalic relationship between each note, how each sounds over which chord


So why don't you explain what your knowledge is of the above? Tell us the "nitty gritty" of it:

1. Notes in each scale in each key
2. Intervallic relationship between each note.
3. How each sounds over each chord

I look forward to this. I think the TS would appreciate it also.

Best,

Sean
#5
1. I don't have the time right now, but you know what I meant

2. As above

3. As above as above

Sean, TS said they understood modes / major scales when all they understand is shapes and box patterns. Clearly some work to be done on their part - getting a grasp on the MAJOR SCALE in every key is simple enough. Understanding the scale for what it is, putting together different intervals to create harmony within an improvisation or over a chord, for instance playing a E and B together over a Cmajor will assume a major 7th sound - quite pleasant. Or an F# over a C major will provide a #11 - "lydianised" if you will

Theres no need to be a smartarse on these forums, its about helping people get the right idea (and also flaming them about the misuse of modes in contemporary music)

My answer was a little vague and dickish I will admit - but there was meaning in there somewhere
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


Quote by Holy Katana

How dare you attack the greatness of the augmented sixth?