#1
iv got a classical guitar that my younger brother wants to use as i dont play it any more but the action is high enough to drive a truck under.
how do i lower the action on a classical??
here are some photos:


nut

1st fret

around 17th/18th fret
#2
That's like my crappy old acoustic I have..

My Ibanez exotic wood acoustic I got rid of not too long ago had a similar action problem, almost half an inch of space when you got past the 12th fret, and the neck was perfectly straight, and the bridge wasn't high or anything.. I don't know what was up, but that's why I got rid of it.
#3
Quote by TheAbsentOne
That's like my crappy old acoustic I have..

My Ibanez exotic wood acoustic I got rid of not too long ago had a similar action problem, almost half an inch of space when you got past the 12th fret, and the neck was perfectly straight, and the bridge wasn't high or anything.. I don't know what was up, but that's why I got rid of it.

yeah this guitar is nothing special. its just a cheap one. i play electric and hardly ever touch it, but my mum and brother want to try and play it, and its really hard to play because of the action.
#6
take off the bridge (little white bar) and use it on a beltsanderto sand it that down a tad, not too low though. just a tad. that will lower the action. do it until it feels comfortable enough to play.
Classical Guitarist
#7
i would recommend not using a belt sander - just a sanding block with the finest possible sand paper.
#8
Please..... No Belt Sanders!

Here. As I always recommend, go to the Frets.Com site and read the section on adjusting action:

http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/pagelist.html#Musician
read the section on "instrument set-up"

( I feel like we should sticky this...)

Everyone wants to jump right on the saddle and whittle away on that, when the first thing you want to go to is the nut. Most of your playing is near the nut, and a slightly-too-high action there will make playing difficult.
Only after you get that end of the guitar set up properly do you need to look at the saddle.

Also, a nylon-string guitar has much less string tension than a steel string, and needs more neck relief than a steel string. So, the saddle height is necessarily higher.
Last edited by Bikewer at Sep 4, 2010,
#9
iv sanded the bridge saddle down a bit and it hasnt really made any difference. ill take a bit off the nut. does it just sit there like the saddle does or is it glued in/how do i get it out?
#10
AAAH!!!! Read The Article!!!

You do not remove the nut. You deepen the slots. Carefully. With the right tools. At the right angle.
Professionals use special files for this chore.

If you wish to do the work yourself, and you do not wish to invest in a set of nut files, you can make do with a "torch tip tool" which is a tool with a bunch of little round files in graduated sizes for cleaning welding torches.
They are available for a few bucks from any good hardware store.

But don't just dive in.... It's easy to cut too deeply and there you are with buzzing strings and needing a new nut.
#11
ok i guess i wont just dive in. ill go see if i can find the right tools for the job and do it carefully.
#12
Just take it to a professional at a local guitar shop. Would you rather spend twenty bucks to have someone personally setup your guitar? Or one hundred and some odd dollars to buy a new guitar?
#13
i mean use it as a sanding tool, ive done that alot when fixing low budget guitars and switching them to left
#14
^^^
1) This is an older thread with no recent activity, shoulda left it alone
2) The saddle doesn't have slots in it like the nut does, so doing what you suggest would ruin the saddle
3) A guitar string is not a tool, it's a guitar string. It's why they make the right tools for the job.