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#1
do you think if i bought myself a violin i'd be able to teach myself to play it without a teacher? i really like violins
does anyone have experience of trying to learn the violin and how hard it is? bad habits to avoid etc.
thanks in advance
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#2
nope. if you can play guitar, it should be really easy.

i picked up a violin once (with zero knowledge of how to play) and after ~5 minutes of getting familiar with it, i was basically able to play anything by ear. obviously not extremely well, but i could definitely make music with it.

i think the strings are similar to a guitar's... but in a different order/pitch? idk but they're similar in some way. somebody else will have to tell you about that.
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Last edited by work sucks at Sep 4, 2010,
#3
Depends on who you are really. From what I know it's not as fast a learning instrument as guitar or piano (usually) and is pretty technique heavy. So yes, chances are it would be tough I think.

edit: to the post above me, that may work for some people. But if he is looking to learn classical he should get a teacher for sure.
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#6
Violin is really hard to learn after what I've heard. Knowing how to play the guitar only gives you some theoretical advantages. Getting a teacher will be a huge advantage.
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#7
It's certainly not easy. inb4 Fassa.
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#8
If your guitar had no frets, do you think you would have been able to teach yourself how to play as easily?
If you want to learn how to play violin, get a teacher.
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#9
You'll get stuck very quickly. You need to be taught the right technique to get a good sound out of the violin and that's hard to get on your own.
#10
I've been playing for almost eight years and I can say that it is hard. With a good teacher it's not difficult to learn but it still takes a long time to get to the point where you sound (to the average listener) good or even tolerable.

Without a teacher it'll be very difficult because there's so much technique involved. If you have a good ear you should be able to play in tune reasonably well with some practice but to sound good you need good tone which only comes with good technique.

I'm sure you could learn to some degree but progress will be much slower than if you have a teacher and you will plateau and find in very hard to progress because of incorrect technique. I know "some degree" is very non specific but progress will vary from person to person. I suspect you'll be able to play a nice tune but you'll end up lacking the control to take advantage of the true beauty of the instrument.

Short answer, get a teacher, you won't regret it.

Also, searchbar because this has been asked a lot.

Edit: What genre do you want to play?
Last edited by 12345abcd3 at Sep 4, 2010,
#11
Also you have to learn how to read music. You HAVE TO learn how to read music. No such thing as tabs.
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#12
I found it really hard to learn violin even with a teacher.

Then again, I taught myself how to play the trombone pretty easily. So idk
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#13
I took lessons for years, and found it really hard because I have big hands, I could never get bowing techniques right, and when it came to play anything fast I lost all coordination. I was good at chords because of guitar though.

It's not an easy instrument to play, partly because violin parts in classical music are often very complicated, and they're tiny.

Then again, some people seem to find it pretty easy.
Last edited by monkey_dancer at Sep 4, 2010,
#14
Quote by 12345abcd3
I've been playing for almost eight years and I can say that it is hard. With a good teacher it's not difficult to learn but it still takes a long time to get to the point where you sound (to the average listener) good or even tolerable.

Without a teacher it'll be very difficult because there's so much technique involved. If you have a good ear you should be able to play in tune reasonably well with some practice but to sound good you need good tone which only comes with good technique.

I'm sure you could learn to some degree but progress will be much slower than if you have a teacher and you will plateau and find in very hard to progress because of incorrect technique. I know "some degree" is very non specific but progress will vary from person to person. I suspect you'll be able to play a nice tune but you'll end up lacking the control to take advantage of the true beauty of the instrument.

Short answer, get a teacher, you won't regret it.

Also, searchbar because this has been asked a lot.

Edit: What genre do you want to play?


best answer so far i don't want to play one specific genre I'm interested in the Irish/ Celtic stuffs and the classical stuff which is probably even more of a reason to find a good teacher, i suppose you people are right, ill have to try and find a teacher in my sh**ty little town
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#15
Quote by aRandomSandwich
best answer so far i don't want to play one specific genre I'm interested in the Irish/ Celtic stuffs and the classical stuff which is probably even more of a reason to find a good teacher, i suppose you people are right, ill have to try and find a teacher in my sh**ty little town
Thank you, lol.

Yeah, if you want to play classical, you need a teacher. Classical music is very demanding. The notes themself are very hard, you need to be able to play quickly and accurately, to shift position accurately and often ect.

It is also demanding because you need to be able to produce a very exact sound quality. You need to have total control over the tone of the instrument because the requirements for tone are so exact. And most of the tone comes from your bowing. For example, I spent over half an hour today going through a piece by Bach and making sure that there was no difference in sound quality when I changed strings, to the point where people cannot hear that I'm changing strings at all. This is difficult because each string has a different tone (play the same note on two different strings on the guitar to hear this) so it incolves changing bow stroke in the middle of a fast passage by pressing harder and moving slower.

This is just one example. Once you get fairly good you will find yourself having to do stuff like this all the time. But without a teacher I would never have picked up on this and without a teacher I would never have picked up on countless other errors in my playing. I also wouldn't know how to practice well to eradicate those errors.

This is why teachers are so important, so when you are finding a teacher try and find one with lots of good references. A good teacher wants to help you realise all your goals, a bad one just wants to take your money.

Edit:Believe it or not, I started this post with the intention of keeping it short.
Last edited by 12345abcd3 at Sep 4, 2010,
#16
Personally, I think it depends on the person. Some people just have a gift where they can just figure out how to play any instrument, and find it pretty easy, even on their own, while others would find it extremely hard to learn even with a teacher.

Kinda similar to learning languages. Some people are just natural at it, the opposite is like me.
#17
Get A teacher you nob-end.
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#18
Tone is ridiculously hard to generate, especially on the screechiest of string instruments (not a violin fan here). There's a reason people train on string instruments for so long. You probably can do it yourself, but you'll get frustrated with how shitty your tone is and give it up without some incredibly good luck or tutorials that I don't know if they exist.

[IN PHIL WE TRUST]


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#19
Quote by work sucks
nope. if you can play guitar, it should be really easy.

Nonsense
#20
I think it'd be very difficult...but it's not impossible.
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#21
Bow technique feels weird as hell after playing guitar. I tried to learn for a while but they were too different for me and I gave up.
#22
Ive never played it, but its probably a lot like most other instruments: Easy to learn, but difficult to play well.
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#23
Quote by Alex78
Nonsense

hahaha, maybe so. that statement is only based on my ~20 minutes of experience with a violin.

i guess it was 'easy' for me to just play some songs and make a discernible tune with a violin, and it sounded good to me, but i probably sounded 'like shit' compared to a real violinist. so i guess actually perfecting your technique and tone would be the hard part, as others have said.

but i still would be inclined to think that being a guitar player gives you a huge advantage versus being a complete beginner with stringed instruments, thus making it not as difficult as most people say it is...
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#24
Quote by Nameless742
Get A teacher you nob-end.

Get off the internet you arse
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#25
I've been playing for ten years and I can tell you that it's not an easy task. You're going to need a teacher. The FIRST thing he/she will tell you to do before even touching a violin is to learn how to read standard notation. You won't be seeing tabs or chord diagrams here.

The transition from guitar to violin is going to be pretty crazy. I did the reverse and it was relatively pain-free. All I can say is find a teacher and good luck!
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#26
Quote by work sucks
hahaha, maybe so. that statement is only based on my ~20 minutes of experience with a violin.

i guess it was 'easy' for me to just play some songs and make a discernible tune with a violin, and it sounded good to me, but i probably sounded 'like shit' compared to a real violinist. so i guess actually perfecting your technique and tone would be the hard part, as others have said.

but i still would be inclined to think that being a guitar player gives you a huge advantage versus being a complete beginner with stringed instruments, thus making it not as difficult as most people say it is...

You have an advantage on putting your fingers on the strings, but that's it. That's the easy part of violin/etc.

[IN PHIL WE TRUST]


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#27
I play bass and violin.
(Among others)

It's not as difficult as people seem to assume it is. The biggest difficulty is just finger placement, as the notes are very close together.
If you have a good ear though, it shouldn't take that long to become proficient.
Practice practice practice.
#28
My god, yes. I've played for four years and I still don't think I'm particularly good at it.

You practically need a teacher for the violin. The techniques used in bowing are very difficult to teach oneself to play cleanly and fluidly. Think about it like this: every bow technique is like sweep picking. Every one of them. They're tough to wrap your head around and they're tough to pull off cleanly unless you've practiced the everloving **** out of them. Correctly holding the bow is a challenge that is very difficult to pass without a teacher. Holding the bow wrong has consequences ranging from poor control to hurting your own hand to producing poor tone, sometimes resulting in what essentially amounts to an analogue for pinch harmonics, but even worse sounding.

The same goes for holding your left hand correctly. Vibrato is a whole different beast than on guitar. There are no frets to make playing a note easy. Missing a correct fingering by a fraction of a centimeter will always (and I mean always) produce a screechy and unearthly shriek of a note that will burn itself into your soul. I'm not even kidding. Playing fretless is a bitch in every sense of the word.

Then there's caring for your instrument. You have to keep the bow-hair clean and use plenty of resin on it to keep the hair healthy, if you will. When you bow the strings, however, this resin rubs off onto the body and the fingerboard. You have to clean both the strings and the fingerboard to after playing as well. Additionally, the oils in your hands are bad for to the bow, so you have to make sure that you don't touch the hair, or else you'll damage it. The bow itself has what amounts to a truss rod that has to be loosened when storing the bow but tightened just-so when you play.

The tuners are friction tuners. You know those things on your guitar? Those are machine tuners. They stay in place mechanically. Friction tuners don't. They're held in by friction and friction alone, meaning they move around if you don't tune it right and store the instrument in a moderate temperature with low humidity. You have to tune accurately and often, usually every time you play. Since violin requires a great deal of practice, you're going to get very patient or give up after you tune the damn things five times a week.

In short, not only is learning the violin hard, playing it is hard and maintaining it is a challenge all of its own. Get a teacher to at least minimize the challenge of the first two.
#29
i used to play as a kid,

its hard like any other instrument, need to spend alot of time practicing to get it down

teacher highly recommended


^and no, every bow movement is not like sweep picking...
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Last edited by JimmyBanks6 at Sep 4, 2010,
#30
Playing violin isn't only about fretting the right notes. Just getting a good sound out of it takes practice. I'd get a teacher.
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#31
Quote by SteveHouse
You have an advantage on putting your fingers on the strings, but that's it. That's the easy part of violin/etc.

mmm well i went from never having touched a violin to being able to play almost any medium-paced melody i could think of within 20 minutes or so.

i'd say that's a pretty big difference from starting out a complete alien to stringed instruments, and i know that would not have been possible without my guitar-playing experience. and i wouldn't call myself a particularly gifted musician, so i'd expect several other experienced guitarists out there to be capable of something similar...
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#32
It's hard but who says guitar is easy.


A lot of people seem to insinuate that guitar is child's play compared to violin and it pisses me off. Sure if u wanna stick to open chords but if you really wanna play stuff like flight of the bumblebee, it takes enormous practice and patience. It's been 3 years and I'm nowhere near the level required for shredding. Classical guitar pieces still seem alien to me.

Only, guitar can be learned by oneself and you'd better get a teacher for violin. Effort is required for both instruments IMO.
#33
Quote by work sucks
mmm well i went from never having touched a violin to being able to play almost any medium-paced melody i could think of within 20 minutes or so.

i'd say that's a pretty big difference from starting out a complete alien to stringed instruments, and i know that would not have been possible without my guitar-playing experience. and i wouldn't call myself a particularly gifted musician, so i'd expect several other experienced guitarists out there to be capable of something similar...

What's your point? I did the same thing on cello but still sounded like shit on a sandwich.

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#34
Quote by sage76
guitar wanking can be learned by oneself and you'd better get a teacher for violin..


fixed
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#36
Quote by SteveHouse
What's your point? I did the same thing on cello but still sounded like shit on a sandwich.

my point is that a guitarist should have a good head start on learning how to play violin, versus your average beginner who's never played another instrument before. that's all.

i'm not equating guitar to violin. but there are obviously several similarities and connections one could make to ease the transition. a little more than just "putting your fingers on the strings" as you said earlier.
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#37
Much harder on those forced to listen
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#38
Eh. It depends on you personally. I picked up a cello one day,played it for a few hours and was fairly decent. The bow techniques I taught myself seemed to be fairly easy to comprehend after a few hours of practice and i already knew a bunch of theory so it wasn't hard to relate my bass guitar experience to that. I just thought it was like picking up another instrument and learning to play it from scratch, not extremely hard but challenging nonetheless. While a teacher is recommended I'm sure you could learn well enough by yourself if you have the determination.
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#40
Quote by JimmyBanks6

^and no, every bow movement is not like sweep picking...


What I meant is that the difficulty of playing it cleanly and consistently is on that level. Obviously, I didn't mean that literally every technique on the violin is analogous to sweep picking.
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