#1
I bought a Fender Blues Deluxe Reissue off a guy in the U.S but I'm living in the UK.. Presuming the amp will have an American style plug, will I be able to just strip back the wire and change the plug to a UK three pin plug?
#2
Are the wire colours the same as UK ones ? Also Is there 3 of them . If so, I dont see why not.


But tbh I would just buy an adapter.
#3
Don't you buy adapters for those things. I remember when Korean students used to stay at my house, their outlets for stuff was really screwed up. So we had to buy an adapter.

I don't think you can change the plug, 'cause isn't UK voltage something other that 120V?
It could be the sleep deprevation, or was that desperation talking.
..I was watching my death.
#4
You'll need a step down transformer, US mains is 110-120V, UK is ~230V, you'll fry the amp if you just use one of the plug adapters.
#5
Quote by littlephil
You'll need a step down transformer, US mains is 110-120V, UK is ~230V, you'll fry the amp if you just use one of the plug adapters.


That's what I thought.
UK voltages being crazy... Silly UK voltage designers.
On a Behringer head that I have, you just have to swap one part on, then it works with 230, or something like that. I read the whole manual of it, don't remember it all though.
..I was watching my death.
#6
US mains is NEVER 110v. idk why people always say that. it's 120 +/- 5% (so it ranges from 114-126v).

unless the stock PT has a tap for 240v, you'll need a new PT. if it has a tap for 240v, all you have to do is move one of the hot wires. the hot wire in US is black, so you'd move that one. the neutral wire in US is white so you'd leave that one alone.

idk if you guys have a neutral and hot or just 2 hots (our 240v appliances have 2 hots). if you can clear this up for me then that'd be awesome.
#7
^ 240V appliances in the US have two hots because they are typically running off two phases. they should still have a neutral connection though, not safe to not have one but i dont have anything to check that on

but yeah, should just have to change the tap on the power transformer, if you can. otherwise, a new power transformer is the better option. you can get away with a high quality converter, but changing the transformer is a better option. going from 60 to 50 Hz shouldnt be too much of an issue. will be less efficient, but shouldnt completly overheat or anything.
#8
Quote by jof1029
^ 240V appliances in the US have two hots because they are typically running off two phases. they should still have a neutral connection though, not safe to not have one but i dont have anything to check that on

but yeah, should just have to change the tap on the power transformer, if you can. otherwise, a new power transformer is the better option. you can get away with a high quality converter, but changing the transformer is a better option. going from 60 to 50 Hz shouldnt be too much of an issue. will be less efficient, but shouldnt completly overheat or anything.


I thought it was 120V and 230V.
..I was watching my death.
#9
nope. 240. then 3-phase 480 and sometimes 600 in factories. factory lighting uses single-phase 277 though. its an odd number but thats what you get when you grab a hot and neutral on a 480v 3-phase system. grabbing any two hots gives you 480v single-phase. anyway what im saying is its all multiples of 120. unless you are Japan, who uses 100v.

industrial electrical stuff is way more fun to learn than residential.
#10
well its not in the same phase, so im pretty sure the worst you can feel is actually 224 volts when you are talking AC and two phases. but then again, im cant really do math right now since im in such a bad mood...