#1
I know this is really noobish, but I have often heard about people using scales in their solos and riffs, and now that I want to start improvising I was just wondering, do they play the notes of the scales they are using in order, or do they just use certain notes in the scales. I couldn't really find a clear answer anywhere, and was just wondering about this. I know I sound stupid but I'd appreciate a good answer. Thanks
#2
They use what-ever notes sound good in the scale. Playing the notes in order won't sound good.
Well actually a lot of them plays certain notes that goes with the chords played, but don't mind that right now.
#3
People just use scales as a kind of rule of what will definately work,
You don't just then play the notes in the order of the scale, I mean you might in a certain lick or something, you just use the scales as a guideline...
Just use the scales to know what notes work in the key and then try using the notes in different orders and timings (=
#4
Quote by benn913
I know this is really noobish, but I have often heard about people using scales in their solos and riffs, and now that I want to start improvising I was just wondering, do they play the notes of the scales they are using in order, or do they just use certain notes in the scales. I couldn't really find a clear answer anywhere, and was just wondering about this. I know I sound stupid but I'd appreciate a good answer. Thanks


They use the notes of a scale in an order that achieves their musical aim. Whether that is all of them in ascending order or just one of them or 4 of them picked at random.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#5
Well when you want to improvise you'd stick to using notes of (for example..) the Pentatonic scale. Its crucial that you have memorised the shape of the pentatonic box to be able to improvise, it also helps to know the notes of the fretboard which will allow you to play the scales in any Key; i.e. if your rhythm switches from the key of A to Gminor, you can switch key with your scales as well to harmonize.

But my technique is to generally noodle and mess around with any notes on the scale, maybe one or 2 notes that aren't on the scale for a bit of flavour. I then use techniques such as slides, double stops, harmonics, hammer-ons, trills, pull-offs, and so on to spice it up.

Comprende?
No ego-inflating quotes nor stupidly long signatures to be found here.

Move along.

Bands/Artists of the month; Marco Sfogli, Marco Sfogli and Marco Sfogli .


Quote by steve_muse
^lol'd at the sig, adj209
#6
Obviously you'll be playing certain notes. If you just played the scales up and down every solo would sound roughly the same, right? You build interest by going high, going low, and using different rhythms.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#7
well it depends really. theres some people that jsut shred mindlessly by just running up and down scales as fast as they can(*cough*michael angelo batio*cough*) and theres people like steve vai who play whatever they think will sound good.

i personally prefer steve's style, but it really depends on the player.


if im trying to shred tho(because of my lack of teh chopz) i usually play phrygian up and down as fast as i can.

but if im tryin to be melodic, i just play what i feel will sound good.
#8
Quote by adj209
Well when you want to improvise you'd stick to using notes of (for example..) the Pentatonic scale. Its crucial that you have memorised the shape of the pentatonic box to be able to improvise


No and no. You needn't stick to the notes of any scale and you certainly don't need to know shapes.

What you need to know, what is absolutely crucial to sounding good is knowing SOUNDS. Learning scales is a shortcut to those sounds and will make it easier but the shapes are completely incidental, that's just where the notes happen to fall on the fretboard, the SOUND is the most important thing.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#9
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
No and no. You needn't stick to the notes of any scale and you certainly don't need to know shapes.

What you need to know, what is absolutely crucial to sounding good is knowing SOUNDS. Learning scales is a shortcut to those sounds and will make it easier but the shapes are completely incidental, that's just where the notes happen to fall on the fretboard, the SOUND is the most important thing.

It is important.
If i knew **** all about music theory; i'd spend 1hr noodling around till i found decent sound notes.

Or i could use my scales and save myself 50 minutes.

Which would you rather do?


For pro-points, do as Marty Friedman does and make your own scales.
No ego-inflating quotes nor stupidly long signatures to be found here.

Move along.

Bands/Artists of the month; Marco Sfogli, Marco Sfogli and Marco Sfogli .


Quote by steve_muse
^lol'd at the sig, adj209
#10
So far, im going to say that everyone that has put in any information is right. Scales can be used multiple ways and everything everyone said so far is just a different interpretation or way of using them.
Treble>Epiphone Prophecy EX - MXR micro Amp - MXR Blue Box - MXR Fullbore - MXR Noise Clamp - Vox AD30VT
Bass>Ibanez BTB505 - MXR Blowtorch - MXR D.I. - Peavey MaxBass 700 - Peavey TVX410