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#1
Ok so here's the deal:

I'm a senior in high school this year, and beginning the college application process. So far I've filled out (but not sent yet) applications for Duquesne and CCM, and plan to do a few more.

So, I've decided to make a thread in which I will consult you guys (it seems there are a few of you with some experience in music school) with any questions I have.

So far the only thing I'm really apprehensive about is the audition process. Does anyone have any general advice about auditions? Maybe you could share your experiences or something.

One specific question: Is the audition generally specific to your major or is it usually an audition for the school in general? The reason I ask this is so that I know what to expect (I'm looking to major in education with a possible minor/double major in performance or something along those lines, depending on the school).

Thanks.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#2
I guess it will depend on the specific school. If you go on their website, they should say what you will be doing in the audition process. As far as advice, bring extra gear(strings, picks, cables, batteries etc...) and be prepared for the unexpected. When I auditioned for Berklee a few months back, the amp they gave me was malfunctioning and the CD I handed to them with my backing track didn't work( My friend who auditioned the day before me had the same problem) but I brought it on my ipod as well.....

Good luck!
Last edited by twistedsister at Sep 4, 2010,
#3
Quote by twistedsister
I guess it will depend on the specific school. If you go on their website, they should say what you will be doing in the audition process.
Yeah I've looked into that. It didn't say anything specific to majors, just a rundown of what an audition will look like. I guess that means it's pretty constant.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#4
Hmm, you shouldn't need to audition if your doing general stuff , or composition.. depending on school of course. Send them an email, they are super helpful to new recruits.

In most places, they just basically want to see that you are good enough so that you are ready to learn more. They dont want to teach you how to play, they want to teach you how to get better, know what I mean? So just go and show them what you can do (which will probably consist of a few tunes, maybe some sight reading, maybe some aural stuff)
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#5
I'm actually looking into CCM as well. This is the undergrad packet with audition information
http://www.ccm.uc.edu/pdf/CCMhandbook1112.pdf

For a lot of the majors, the auditions are pretty specific, especially when it comes to an instrument.

I think that getting into contact with the schools is a really good idea.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
Last edited by FacetOfChaos at Sep 4, 2010,
#6
it really depends on the school and major. Most good programs make their music ed students audition, some hold them to the same standards as a performance major, others don't. the most important part of the music ed audition is the essay and interview, which is designed to weed out people who see education as a fall back for their performing career (as well as to see if your a fit for the program). For your audition, it depends on whether or not your doing jazz or classical. Jazz auditions are typically pretty laid back and can be anything from playing a few tunes with a trio to playing 7 or 8 tunes, a transcription (which must be provided to the comitee), sight reading and an aural skills test and can also be anywhere in between. I looked at both CCM and duqense when i was audition and, if i remember correctly both require (for guitar) scales and arpeggios and a few tunes but its probably most important for you to ask the school what they want and remember your going to be competing with tons of applicants for a relatively small amount of spots in the program.
#7
I might as well ask some things since I'm in the same boat as food. How proficient should you be at sight reading? I might go into guitar, harp, or music education. I've done almost no sight reading of standard notation on guitar and I'm wondering what a safe bet would be.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#8
depends on the program and the emphasis. for any program, your playing will be MUCH more important then your reading and guitarists are expected to be kind of shitty readers. that being said, you should spend 10-15 minutes a day sightreading on guitar, and if you do that from now until your audition you will be in solid shape. id suggest practicing out of Bop Duets and Rhythms complete by bugs bower, or melodic rhythms for guitar and sight reading for guitar by william leavit (or some combination of the two), as well as practicing reading charts out of a fakebook.
#9
Quote by nightwind
Hmm, you shouldn't need to audition if your doing general stuff , or composition.. depending on school of course. Send them an email, they are super helpful to new recruits.
It seems like most of the programs I'm interested in require an audition. I have seen some that don't, but they're not programs I'm particularly interested in.

Quote by nightwind
In most places, they just basically want to see that you are good enough so that you are ready to learn more. They dont want to teach you how to play, they want to teach you how to get better, know what I mean? So just go and show them what you can do (which will probably consist of a few tunes, maybe some sight reading, maybe some aural stuff)
This is reassuring. I'm not too worried about demonstrating my skills with theory/aural kind of stuff, but one thing I have no clue about is picking music to play. Some schools seem to be super particular about the music you pick. For example do you think this would be a good piece to play according to these guidelines? Should I just pick something like that that shows what I can do, or should I try to pick something that they want to hear?

Quote by FacetOfChaos
I'm actually looking into CCM as well. This is the undergrad packet with audition information
http://www.ccm.uc.edu/pdf/CCMhandbook1112.pdf

For a lot of the majors, the auditions are pretty specific, especially when it comes to an instrument.

I think that getting into contact with the schools is a really good idea.
Sweet man, what instrument?

And yeah, Duquesne's site is pretty good for that as well, it tells you exactly what you need to be able to do for your instrument.

Also, do you know if CCM is even fit for bass guitar, or should I try auditioning on another instrument like guitar?

Quote by FacetOfChaos
I might as well ask some things since I'm in the same boat as food. How proficient should you be at sight reading? I might go into guitar, harp, or music education. I've done almost no sight reading of standard notation on guitar and I'm wondering what a safe bet would be.
Yeah, like tehREALcaptain said, reading seems to be one of the less-important factors, but I'd make sure you're pretty solid at it.

I myself am not great at reading (particularly bass clef), but I'm playing both guitar and bass in my school's jazz band this year, so that should help me a lot.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#10
Quote by food1010
Sweet man, what instrument?

Also, do you know if CCM is even fit for bass guitar, or should I try auditioning on another instrument like guitar?

Most likely classical guitar, jazz, or harp. Really interested in music ed as well.

Can't say whether or not there's a specific major for it but it looks like you could go into jazz studies since the packet says you can audition with electric bass
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#11
Quote by FacetOfChaos
Most likely classical guitar, jazz, or harp. Really interested in music ed as well.
Oh, right. Now I remember that you said that earlier.

Quote by FacetOfChaos
Can't say whether or not there's a specific major for it but it looks like you could go into jazz studies since the packet says you can audition with electric bass
What kind of career options are there for a jazz studies major? I want to do music ed, because of the career options it gives (actually when I filled out the app I selected the music ed/performance double major they offer, which would be sweet).

Although I guess since they do have electric bass auditions then that won't be a problem for music ed. I was under the impression that they didn't really associate with electric bass at all.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#12
Quote by food1010
What kind of career options are there for a jazz studies major? I want to do music ed, because of the career options it gives (actually when I filled out the app I selected the music ed/performance double major they offer, which would be sweet).

Although I guess since they do have electric bass auditions then that won't be a problem for music ed. I was under the impression that they didn't really associate with electric bass at all.

Hmmm, that type of major might be limited to actually playing jazz or giving lessons.

Hopefully you'd be able to use bass for your performance instrument. I'd mail/email them to make sure though. That kind of double major would be awesome
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#13
Quote by FacetOfChaos
Hmmm, that type of major might be limited to actually playing jazz or giving lessons.
Yeah I figured. As fun as it sounds, I don't want to be limited to that.

Quote by FacetOfChaos
Hopefully you'd be able to use bass for your performance instrument. I'd mail/email them to make sure though. That kind of double major would be awesome
Agreed. Even before I started looking at schools I decided I wanted to double major in performance and education if possible, then I saw the CCM major and I was very excited. If I can use bass as my instrument, I think CCM would be perfect. It's a great school, tuition's about 6k less than the other schools I'm looking at, and my sister lives in Cincinnati, so I'd be able to visit her a lot.

Although, I'd be much more likely to get scholarship money at a private school like Duquesne. So I guess I'll just see how things play out.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#14
I got into CCM for Fall of '09 applying for jazz guitar. Didn't end up going but you can PM any questions and I can pretty much tell you exactly what I did for it.
12 fret fury
#15
As someone with a few friends that are majoring in music, and who is going through the same process (but for tuba)

Auditions: Choose your music carefully. Try to choose some standard rep to show the board that you can play. Dont choose something too hard though. Theyd rather see you play somethin simple that you can make sound really good than a song with a million notes you cant play. Also, make sure to take a lesson with the teacher if you can before your audition. If you do take a lesson, MAKE SURE TO DO SOME OF THE THINGS THE PROFESSOR TOLD YOU ABOUT DURING YOUR AUDITION. That way, the professor might say, "Well, he didnt have the BEST audition, but at least I know I can teach him something."

Taking a lesson is also good because your going to be spending for years and a lot of money on your professor. You want to make sure you know him and that you jive with him before you throw away time and money on a professor you cant stand

If they ask you to stop mid-piece during your audition, dont worry. They have probably hundreds of applicants they need to hear that day and its unlikely that they will listen to ANYONES entire audition.

As far as your question about getting into the school:

The music school and the school are different. You can get accepted to the school (proper GPA, ACT, etc) and not have a good enough audition to get into the music school. The opposite is true too; you can have a killing audition and not have the grades to get into the actual school (although with a good enough audition, the professor may be able to vouch for you).

For the ed question:

Each professor has what he calls a "studio" of players. Each studio has a cap depending on the size of the school. A large state school like NIU will have about 11 tuba students for instance. A smaller school with the same teacher, like Roosevelt, will have 4-5 students. I talked to the tuba teacher (he teaches at both) and he said that sometimes he will bend that rules and get 2 ed students in place of one. For instance, say he has 3 openings at Roosevelt. He might decide to take 2 performance and 2 ed because the actual one on one teaching that HE does for the two ed majors will only equal one performance major.

Any other questions, ask in this thread or PM

PS If your majoring in electric bass, you better make sure your school has a good program for it. A lot of schools either dont offer electric bass as a major, or have a shitty program. Thats not to say you cant find a good electric bass program, but they are few and far between.
Last edited by tubatom868686 at Sep 4, 2010,
#16
Quote by tubatom868686
As someone with a few friends that are majoring in music, and who is going through the same process (but for tuba)

Auditions: Choose your music carefully. Try to choose some standard rep to show the board that you can play. Dont choose something too hard though. Theyd rather see you play somethin simple that you can make sound really good than a song with a million notes you cant play. Also, make sure to take a lesson with the teacher if you can before your audition. If you do take a lesson, MAKE SURE TO DO SOME OF THE THINGS THE PROFESSOR TOLD YOU ABOUT DURING YOUR AUDITION. That way, the professor might say, "Well, he didnt have the BEST audition, but at least I know I can teach him something."

Taking a lesson is also good because your going to be spending for years and a lot of money on your professor. You want to make sure you know him and that you jive with him before you throw away time and money on a professor you cant stand

If they ask you to stop mid-piece during your audition, dont worry. They have probably hundreds of applicants they need to hear that day and its unlikely that they will listen to ANYONES entire audition.

As far as your question about getting into the school:

The music school and the school are different. You can get accepted to the school (proper GPA, ACT, etc) and not have a good enough audition to get into the music school. The opposite is true too; you can have a killing audition and not have the grades to get into the actual school (although with a good enough audition, the professor may be able to vouch for you).

For the ed question:

Each professor has what he calls a "studio" of players. Each studio has a cap depending on the size of the school. A large state school like NIU will have about 11 tuba students for instance. A smaller school with the same teacher, like Roosevelt, will have 4-5 students. I talked to the tuba teacher (he teaches at both) and he said that sometimes he will bend that rules and get 2 ed students in place of one. For instance, say he has 3 openings at Roosevelt. He might decide to take 2 performance and 2 ed because the actual one on one teaching that HE does for the two ed majors will only equal one performance major.

Any other questions, ask in this thread or PM

PS If your majoring in electric bass, you better make sure your school has a good program for it. A lot of schools either dont offer electric bass as a major, or have a shitty program. Thats not to say you cant find a good electric bass program, but they are few and far between.
Hey man thanks for the advice. Seems very helpful.

About the electric bass thing, do you know of any schools that are known as good electric bass schools?
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#17
Quote by food1010
Hey man thanks for the advice. Seems very helpful.

About the electric bass thing, do you know of any schools that are known as good electric bass schools?


California institute of the arts. Electric bass teacher is Alphonso Johnson (pre-jaco weather report). The upright bass teachers played on several albums that defined jazz, so the jazz/contemporary thing is really happenin. Cal arts does not have an Ed program though. Theyre music school only offers performance degrees. However, its important to note, 95% of their music school students have a job in the field they majored in before graduation. Thats MILES ahead of any other school Ive ever heard of
#18
Food,

I think if you show a facility to play the bass, that you'll get in - the audition is to basically judge your ability to execute on the instrument. I don't think its a big guessing game, frankly you're not competing with the teacher, but with other students auditions. So bring the best you can do. Memorize it and raise the bar and then go in and play. One of my students did a classical type piece on bass and tore it up. It had many time signatures throughout - constantly changing. We spent about 3 months training him on the piece, but it worked. He also got best in State as a Senior here in Texas.

I think the fact that he tackled such a strong piece and mastered it, showed a lot to the instructors at the audition.

Best,

Sean
#19
Going off of what Sean said, if you start preparing a really difficult piece a few months out from your audition, and you can REALLY play it for the audition, the teachers will love you. Most auditions for most schools are in January
#20
Lots of good advice here.

I'll just add a couple of things:

1. Usually the playing expectations are quite high. They generally expect you to be a proficient enough player that, by the time you finish your degree, your playing level will be consistent with the expectations that others have when you say "I have a degree in music."

2. From my experience, you should be prepared enough that you can play your pieces pretty much in your sleep. That said, keep in mind that the people listening to you want you to be successful. They want you to do well. They're not going to be all Simon Cowell on you.

3. At the time you audition, you will not be competing with your teacher, as was said above. But once you graduate, you will be competing with others for gigs. One of those others just might be your teacher.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#21
Hey guys, I have an audition planned for November 19th at Duquesne, and I need to choose a piece to play. The site says "The applicant should also perform at least one prepared solo piece of his or her choice. These can be etudes, solo transcriptions, standard jazz tunes, or original compositions." (http://www.duq.edu/music/apply/undergraduate/guidelines.cfm#basse)

So my question to you is, would "Come On, Come Over" by Jaco be a good piece to play?
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#22
I think it's a bit too repetitive for an audition. Not that basslines aren't repetitive most of the time, but the line in the first section is basically played for almost 3/4s of the whole song.

Don't get me wrong, I don't think anyone would doubt that you could play bass if you can play that, I just think you might want some variation. They usually suggest standards because you can kill a ton of birds with one stone, you can interpret the melody, play the transcription of one of the original solos, improvise your own solo, on top of the walking lines/ whatever other style you put in it. So in the same amount of time you would've showcased all of that.

That song is hip though, I'm not a big jaco fan but man there's no one like him.
#23
I think come on come over might be a bit repetitive. On the other hand, Portrait of Tracy would be wonderful if you can play it. Also something like a transcription of The Chicken, from either the Birthday Concert CD or the trio jam with Scofield would be great. Try to select something that shows your ability to groove, function in an ensemble (catching hits, etc), and improvise. Good luck!
#24
PoT has been really overdone tbh, I'd come up with something fresher than that.

Can you play Donna Lee? If you can I suggest you learn another Bird tune and tackle it like you did for Donna Lee.

How overdone is Donna Lee anyways? I guess it's not as cliche as Portrait of Tracy since it's much much harder but I still think it's a bit cliche for bass players as well. I don't mind playing it and I really like the changes but meh, if I could choose I would pick another bebop tune.
#25
Quote by Pillo114
PoT has been really overdone tbh, I'd come up with something fresher than that.

Can you play Donna Lee? If you can I suggest you learn another Bird tune and tackle it like you did for Donna Lee.

How overdone is Donna Lee anyways? I guess it's not as cliche as Portrait of Tracy since it's much much harder but I still think it's a bit cliche for bass players as well. I don't mind playing it and I really like the changes but meh, if I could choose I would pick another bebop tune.


It's overdone because it is seen as a benchmark of skill, just like Donna Lee. It's part of the standard repertoire for electric bass, especially in the Jazz setting.
#26
Most if not all of these threads can be summarised by the sentence "phone up the school in question". I did, and got the information i needed to get where i wanted to go.
#27
I've never had/watched one of these auditions before, but I've noticed a lot of people have been asking "what piece do I play?".

If I were to audition, I wouldn't learn some piece just to impress them with my awesomeness. Instead I'd call the school, and ask what pieces were most commonly auditioned and what they'd suggest were good ones. From here, you can pick one of these songs and learn it, or use them as guidelines as to what sorts of songs are usually done, and pick one from that genre.

Then I'd pick one that I could play comfortably (ie. within my skill range), and practice it so much that I wouldn't have to think about it when the audition comes. As we all know, the way to overcome nerves is through preparation and playing within your skill limits. Not all musicians at university are virtuosos.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#28
Quote by AlanHB
I've never had/watched one of these auditions before, but I've noticed a lot of people have been asking "what piece do I play?".

If I were to audition, I wouldn't learn some piece just to impress them with my awesomeness. Instead I'd call the school, and ask what pieces were most commonly auditioned and what they'd suggest were good ones. From here, you can pick one of these songs and learn it, or use them as guidelines as to what sorts of songs are usually done, and pick one from that genre.

Then I'd pick one that I could play comfortably (ie. within my skill range), and practice it so much that I wouldn't have to think about it when the audition comes. As we all know, the way to overcome nerves is through preparation and playing within your skill limits. Not all musicians at university are virtuosos.
See I've heard almost the opposite, that it's better to pick a piece that showcases your abilities rather than playing something they want you to hear and not playing it as well.

I mean you're right, you don't want to pick a piece that is just you trying to show off your skills, but you do want to pick a piece that suits you.

Yeah, I figured Come On Come Over was a bit too repetitive.

Pillo, I haven't taken the time to learn Donna Lee. I'll check it out and see what I can do.

Keep in mind, this isn't a jazz audition. I'm planning on going into Music Education, so I don't really need to demonstrate that I can play a jazz standard, I just need to show them I can play. That's why I thought Come On Come Over would be nice, because it's less jazz and more funk, which is what I'm generally better at.

I mean obviously they're not going to be thinking "why is this kid playing jazz?" if I do pick a jazz piece, but just keep in mind that it's not an audition for a jazz program.

Quote by griffRG7321
Most if not all of these threads can be summarised by the sentence "phone up the school in question". I did, and got the information i needed to get where i wanted to go.
Like I said, I don't necessarily want to pick a piece that's standard for an audition. Naturally, I'm not going to pick something inappropriate, but I don't want to pick from a list of a few safe standards. I'd rather pick a song that I can really groove to.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Oct 11, 2010,
#29
Do you guys have any experience with applying for or being in a composition class in university?
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#30
Quote by food1010
See I've heard almost the opposite, that it's better to pick a piece that showcases your abilities rather than playing something they want you to hear and not playing it as well.

I mean you're right, you don't want to pick a piece that is just you trying to show off your skills, but you do want to pick a piece that suits you.


It really depends where you heard it from. Have you discussed this point of view with the university? Is it ok if I play a harder piece at a mediocre level than a medium skilled piece well? Is playing fast and flashy techniques more important that the ability to play the correct notes at a slower tempo?

I guess it reminds me of auditioning guitarists for bands (I hate doing that) and you get the guy who just attempts to shred badly over everything in an attempt to show off. I'd much prefer nice melodic lines played cleaner. If you can combine these, that's awesome.

Most universities give a list of suggestions of songs on their websites. Have you looked at any of those? Here's an except from ANU's website for jazz auditionees; (full link at http://music.anu.edu.au/jazz-auditions)

Latin:
Triste
Girls from Impanema
Wave
Corcavado
Meditation
1 Note Samba
How Insensitive
St Thomas
Little Suede


Swing:
Tangerine
A Train
Don’t Get Around Much Anymore
Stompin’ At The Savoy
Song Is You
Lady Bird
Just Friends


Blues:
(This should consist of the melody/one solo chorus improvised if possible).

Blue Monk
Tenor Madness
Blues for Alice
Billies Bounce
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#31
Quote by Pillo114
PoT has been really overdone tbh, I'd come up with something fresher than that.

Can you play Donna Lee? If you can I suggest you learn another Bird tune and tackle it like you did for Donna Lee.

How overdone is Donna Lee anyways? I guess it's not as cliche as Portrait of Tracy since it's much much harder but I still think it's a bit cliche for bass players as well. I don't mind playing it and I really like the changes but meh, if I could choose I would pick another bebop tune.

They really don't care about that. How much do you think they get people coming in playing "Oleo" or "Girl from Ipanema"? Probably at least a dozen on any given audition day. They understand that a large portion of auditions are going to be common pieces. If anything, this is a good thing because it lets the instructor know how you stack up.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


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#32
Quote by AlanHB
It really depends where you heard it from. Have you discussed this point of view with the university? Is it ok if I play a harder piece at a mediocre level than a medium skilled piece well? Is playing fast and flashy techniques more important that the ability to play the correct notes at a slower tempo?
It's not even so much difficulty level I'm worried about. I'm more concerned about style/genre.

Quote by AlanHB
Most universities give a list of suggestions of songs on their websites. Have you looked at any of those? Here's an except from ANU's website for jazz auditionees; (full link at http://music.anu.edu.au/jazz-auditions)
Yeah I've looked at a few of those. Even on Duquesne's site (check the list I linked to), they have specific guidelines (such as "Suggested solos include an etude by Simandl, Bille, Storch, etc.; sonata by Marcello, Vivaldi, etc. (two movements acceptable)" for double bass), but for electric bass, they seem to leave it more up to you.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#33
My audition's coming up pretty soon so I really need to crack down on this.

I had an idea, though: Since "Come On Come Over" is probably too repetitive as is, what if I wrote out an arrangement of it that removes all the redundancies? Maybe I could add variations or a solo section or something.

I might end up asking the school as well, but I thought I'd get your opinion on it.

If all else fails, I think I might just get a solo transcription online somewhere and play that.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#34
It would definitely be appropriate to ask the school about it. A re-arrangement would be cool, but check their requirements as to what you are playing with. A live rhythm section would be great if you were doing that, but chances are you would have to sequence your own midi backing track.
#35
Quote by Windwaker
It would definitely be appropriate to ask the school about it. A re-arrangement would be cool, but check their requirements as to what you are playing with. A live rhythm section would be great if you were doing that, but chances are you would have to sequence your own midi backing track.
Sorry, I mean making a solo arrangement out of it, so I could play it alone while still avoiding any redundancies (for example, in the song it repeats the main riff like twenty times in a row, which is fine in context, but out of context it is a bit too repetitive, particularly for an audition).
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#36
Sorry, I mean making a solo arrangement out of it, so I could play it alone while still avoiding any redundancies (for example, in the song it repeats the main riff like twenty times in a row, which is fine in context, but out of context it is a bit too repetitive, particularly for an audition).


what your suggesting would be perfect for a berklee audition. for almost anywhere else, they want to hear your playing on something quantifiable, standard and familiar (well, for most of your audition. most jazz places make you play some standards and give you a piece of your choice or something). if this is to show technical proficiency, you can try playing a bach cello suite (something I know the electric bassists at my school do), or something like a jaco transcription (or a transcription from another player you like---you could also do something out of the charlie parker omnibook if your up to it) would also be good.
#37
Quote by tehREALcaptain
what your suggesting would be perfect for a berklee audition. for almost anywhere else, they want to hear your playing on something quantifiable, standard and familiar (well, for most of your audition. most jazz places make you play some standards and give you a piece of your choice or something). if this is to show technical proficiency, you can try playing a bach cello suite (something I know the electric bassists at my school do), or something like a jaco transcription (or a transcription from another player you like---you could also do something out of the charlie parker omnibook if your up to it) would also be good.
I don't see how a Jaco arrangement is much different from a Jaco transcription. Could you please explain what makes an arrangement less standard?

Edit: "The applicant should also perform at least one prepared solo piece of his or her choice. These can be etudes, solo transcriptions, standard jazz tunes, or original compositions."
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Nov 7, 2010,
#38
I think captain means that in a solo transcription you play the solo exactly as it was played while you get more freedom in an arrangement to do your own basslines, solos, etc within that same arrangement so it's harder to gauge.

I think come on come over is going to be hard to rearrange, what were you thinking of doing? I have the transcribed vocal melody and changes if you want them. The plus side to it I think is that since it's vampy you could segue into something else or transpose other jaco grooves and stuff into it. A lot of jaco's stuff is on vamps or on no changes so it shouldnt be hard to inject some of it into come on come over.
#39
Quote by Pillo114
I think captain means that in a solo transcription you play the solo exactly as it was played while you get more freedom in an arrangement to do your own basslines, solos, etc within that same arrangement so it's harder to gauge.

I think come on come over is going to be hard to rearrange, what were you thinking of doing? I have the transcribed vocal melody and changes if you want them. The plus side to it I think is that since it's vampy you could segue into something else or transpose other jaco grooves and stuff into it. A lot of jaco's stuff is on vamps or on no changes so it shouldnt be hard to inject some of it into come on come over.
I was thinking mainly just stuff like cutting out excess repeated sections (for example, doing like four times through the verse riff instead of 16 or however many there are), maybe adding some variations to the riffs in, and possibly adding a solo in at the end.

I do get what you mean about how it's harder to gauge a person's playing on their own work. The guidelines on Duquesne's website say original compositions are fine though.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
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