#1
I've been "playing guitar" for about a year and a half... Not really any lessons though. I took it in school a bit but didn't really learn anything. I can play a bunch of riffs, a couple songs, a whole bunch of chords, I can sight read to a certain extent, and I know a few easy scales.

I don't have money for lessons but I want to expand my horizons and learn how to improve sight reading, I want to learn to improvise, I want to learn more advanced guitar techniques, and all that sort of stuff. Basically I want to take my guitar playing to a whole new level...

So I wanna know where to start. Like what scales should I be learning, what techniques, any tips people can give me, anything.
#2
learn the g major scale and the e major scale.

learn the em pentatonic. learn 7th chords.
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
#3
With that many goals you could try really hard to save up the 30 bucks or whatever for like, a lesson a month or something.... Given how far you want to go it seems like the only way.
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#4
Quote by Banjocal
learn the g major scale and the e major scale.

learn the em pentatonic. learn 7th chords.


how many octaves for those scales?
#5
Quote by Zach101
how many octaves for those scales?

two.
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
#6
Learn this:
The major scale.
Natural minor, harmonic minor.
How to construct these scales.
How to find the key of a song (using resolution and the accidentals/key signature)
The diatonic triads of the major scale and how to find them.
Chord construction - up to seventh chords and beyond if you're ambitious.

I don't know what techniques you already have or what music you play so:
Hammer on/pull off
Slides
Alternate/economy picking
String skipping (start off just skipping one string at a time)
Legato (but start easy so you don't develop a sloppy technique)
Tapping with one finger. (I use middle so I can keep my pick in one spot and switch immediately between picking and tapping)
Tap slides (tapping and then sliding the tap hand. Gets an interesting sound)
Sweep picking (start slow and easy. It takes time to get down)

Learn songs.
Instead of endless exercises on technique, I find that playing songs that utilize the technique(s) is a much more effective way to learn.

For the theory bits you should be able to find most of it here:
http://www.musictheory.net/

This is a fairly large list so take it a step at a time. You will NOT learn or have a good command over all of this if you rush through it. It will take time.

Learn and apply. Move on only when you feel you have a solid grasp of the task on hand and that it has become a part of your musical toolbox.

Edit: also what Eastwinn said.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
Last edited by FacetOfChaos at Sep 4, 2010,
#7
Best method? Get a job and then get lessons.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#8
Quote by Zach101
how many octaves for those scales?
I can already tell you're taking the wrong* approach to scales. I think the best way to go is to learn how to construct the major scale based on intervals. That way, you already know all twelve major scale in every octave imaginable.

*and by wrong I mean not the most efficient.

The way you do this is to primarily learn about intervals. You can do that by reading through these two articles: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/general_music/the_crusade_part_2_intervals.html
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/general_music/the_crusade_part_3_applying_them_intervals.html

After you have familiarized yourself with that, that is practically all you need to know. As long as you know a major scale contains 1 2 3 4 5 6 7, then you can construct one anywhere. You can say "I want to build a C# major scale, yo." You take your C# root and then go "hey, I know that a major second is D#!" And the rest is history.

If you're unfamiliar with the "scale degree" deal, here's a quick rundown:

Any number without a # or b next to it is a major or perfect interval.

1 is the root note.
2 is a major second.
3 is a major third.
4 is a perfect fourth.
I think you got it from there.

Then once you start to add accidentals (like in the natural minor scale, 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7), here are a few examples:

b2, b3, b6 and b7 are minor intervals. b5 is a diminished fifth. #4 and #5 are augmented intervals. Then you get into stuff like bb7 which is a diminished seventh. This kind of thing is less common though (in fact, it's usually only used when constructing a diminished seventh chord).

Hope that helps.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#9
Quote by Zach101
I've been "playing guitar" for about a year and a half... Not really any lessons though. I took it in school a bit but didn't really learn anything. I can play a bunch of riffs, a couple songs, a whole bunch of chords, I can sight read to a certain extent, and I know a few easy scales.

I don't have money for lessons but I want to expand my horizons and learn how to improve sight reading, I want to learn to improvise, I want to learn more advanced guitar techniques, and all that sort of stuff. Basically I want to take my guitar playing to a whole new level...

So I wanna know where to start. Like what scales should I be learning, what techniques, any tips people can give me, anything.



Perhaps it all comes down to attitude, you say you didn't learn anything in school, when perhaps attention should have been duly paid?

What it boils down to is just playing...That's really all there is, the theory behind it all helps a ton and as does lessons but if you are not willing to put in the long hours (or short concentrated hours) into it, then its all for nothing

Also, what everyone else said
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


Quote by Holy Katana

How dare you attack the greatness of the augmented sixth?
#10
Quote by Tominator_1991
Perhaps it all comes down to attitude, you say you didn't learn anything in school, when perhaps attention should have been duly paid?

What it boils down to is just playing...That's really all there is, the theory behind it all helps a ton and as does lessons but if you are not willing to put in the long hours (or short concentrated hours) into it, then its all for nothing

Also, what everyone else said


No.. I actually paid a lot of attention in school... I got 91 in the class at the end. What I meant by it didn't help was basically all we did was play basic chords (C, D, E, ETC.) and play easy songs like Fly Me To The Moon and Hey Jude. :|
#11
Quote by Eastwinn
Best method? Get a job and then get lessons.


Gee thanks. Thank god there are OTHER people on this site who aren't retards who can give me good answers. I don't appreciate your answer, it was ill-advised.
#12
There is nothing better than a good teacher because they will steer you the right way instantly.

However i think i've benefitted in different ways from being self-taught, it's almost forced me to analyse every aspect of my playing to figure out what i'm doing wrong - so much so that i can now look at someone else playing and tell pretty much instantly what they're doing wrong.

It's encouraged self-learning, which is the best kind in my opinion. However, getting a tutor is ALWAYS a very good way to advance quickly on the guitar. But, with some logical thinking you can do it all yourself.

The thing is you have to think about the problem and the solution to things.

Improvs always sound the same? Learn your intervals, study how to spice things up, study new licks in all different note values that you can throw into your playing to create certain moods.

Can't pick fast enough? You need to sit down and look at EVERYTHING. Is your thumb placed correctly? Is your picking arc too big? Are you sometimes mucking up a pick stroke mid-run? You just need to sit down and figure out why, and then come to places like this is you can't figure out how to solve the problem.

It's harder than getting lessons but figuring this stuff out will help you in the long run.

Not only this, but you answered your own question. You want to learn new techniques? Then learn them. Start now. Okay you might think 'well i don't know how' but really it's simple:

Wanna learn tapping? Start with a pattern you know, tap some notes out. Create different patterns and runs, and then extend them. If it sounds crap you have to analyse why. For example, if there is excess noise, figure out where to place your tapping hand to stop that noise. If the notes don't sound clear, figure out exactly how/where to tap to get a clear note out of it.
Last edited by GilbertsPinky at Sep 5, 2010,
#13
Quote by Zach101
Gee thanks. Thank god there are OTHER people on this site who aren't retards who can give me good answers. I don't appreciate your answer, it was ill-advised.


Ironically, it's good advice.
shred is gaudy music
#14
Quote by GuitarMunky
Ironically, it's good advice.




No one on this forum is gonna tell you that lessons aren't worth the money.. if you don't have the money then you should attempt to obtain it. If you are in circumstances that do not allow you to get a job then disregard my comment, but if you're simply not willing to put effort into learning how to play guitar by indirectly putting effort into raising money then you won't get anywhere anyway.

I'm not trying to be an asshole, I'm trying to help you.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#15
You can use my lesson site: http://lessons.mikedodge.com

The Beginners to Advanced Series will show you the stuff you SHOULD know (read it from the first link down as each lesson picks up where the last one left off).

The On Topic Tutorials will show you the stuff you WANT to know (you can read these in any order as each link is it's own comprehensive lesson dealing with a scale, styles, technique...IOW...all Application)

You can also take a look at my forum, which is really just a online spot I post my one-off lessons, concepts, thoughts, and things I come up with or need to document somewhere: http://mikedodge.freeforums.org/one-off-lessons-and-concepts-f2.html?sid=57cb2c7f6a89d49f69c65990998acbde

These lessons are made for someone who has been playing a while and is looking to take the next step, fill in some gaps, or learn many angles on application and concepts.

Have fun!
#16
mikedodge

Hey Im new here ive been looking at your sight and looking at the intervals. I understood it till

I got to the part where you started counting them up to 15 in the scale and breaking it down.

C D E F G A B C
R 2/9 M3 4/11 5 6/13 M7 R

what I dont get is why is the G-5 just that instead of G-5/12 ? thanks
#17
Quote by Zach101
No.. I actually paid a lot of attention in school... I got 91 in the class at the end. What I meant by it didn't help was basically all we did was play basic chords (C, D, E, ETC.) and play easy songs like Fly Me To The Moon and Hey Jude. :|



Okay, thats a fair point
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


Quote by Holy Katana

How dare you attack the greatness of the augmented sixth?
#18
Honestly, OP. Check out this link. Look at the left side. Those should keep you busy for a while. Especially when one considers that it's literally impossible to become 'perfect' at playing guitar.

What I do is TRY to pick one topic and learn it pretty well. A couple weeks ago my goal was memorizing the whole minor pentatonic scale. Right now I'm working on making my minor pentatonic that I memorized up and down the board sound good, with notes in the proper places while making the phrasing sound exciting to me. After all, no one cares if I can play notes if they don't sound nice while I play them! But that's my advice, from one non-expert to another. ^.^

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/

Also, learn songs. Like Facet said.
Last edited by Rvn at Sep 5, 2010,
#19
Quote by normajean7890
mikedodge

Hey Im new here ive been looking at your sight and looking at the intervals. I understood it till

I got to the part where you started counting them up to 15 in the scale and breaking it down.

C D E F G A B C
R 2/9 M3 4/11 5 6/13 M7 R

what I dont get is why is the G-5 just that instead of G-5/12 ? thanks


I was just showing how you get past the first octave...the octave is at the 8th interval which is the Root.

Simple chord building is based on triads and then you build up from there. So just as the Root is the Root regardless of waht octave you are in, the M3 is the M3 and the 5th is the 5th regardless of what octave you're in...when building chords.

Read it again, is you got "the Root is the Root" part fine you should be able to catch the info on the M3 and the 5th too.