#1
Im considering buying a seven string guitar so i can play: Amon Amarth, old arch enemy etc. without tuning it down. But ive heard that 7 strings are for very technical players and that they're no good for rhythm playing. Im just thinking: why is that? Does it have a bad sound for playing 6 string stuff or?

And if you think it would be a good idea to buy a 7 string for playing b standard stuff, which one would you recommend?
#2
It's because if you've spent your entire time playing a six-string, most people will either forget the low B is there until it rings out offensively, or they'll play it improperly, hitting the B instead of the low E.
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#3
The pickups on 7-strings are a little less midsy so the B doesn't sound muddy, I'm pretty sure, but it shouldn't be that big of a deal, and I don't really see the need for a low B if you're not playing rhythm anyways, and my buddy's BC Rich JRV7 sounds fine for rhythm(well, it sounds the same as his Masterpiece Bich with the same pickups, anyways, which sounds good under a decent setup but he's the 0-mids, 10-everything-else-through-a-Spider's-metal-channel kinda guy). =P And I hear nothing but good things about the Schecter C-7 Loomis, maybe that might be worth a look?
Quote by SlayingDragons
Nah, I prefer to tune lower. My tunings usually go into weird Hebrew symbols.
#4
I think 7-strings are great for rhythm playing! I play everything in B standard on mine, sounds great, feels fantastic!

I'd recommend and Ibanez 1527 or an Agile.

EDIT: The Schecter C-7 Loomis sounds great too!
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Last edited by BlisteringDDj at Sep 4, 2010,
#5
7strings aren't so much for technical players as much as people who can get their hands to freaking remember that there's a low B string too. You just have to be conscious of the low B. It certainly doesn't hurt to be technical, but you don't need it.
#6
Quote by Kruuse_51
But ive heard that 7 strings are for very technical players and that they're no good for rhythm playing.
Completely false, 7s are no more technical guitars than 6 strings, its an extra string, thats it. They're no harder to play and definately doesnt affect 6 string playing, rhythm or otherwise.




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#7
So, wait.

You're going to get a seven-string, so you can play downtuned stuff,but you will play it as though it were a six-string... so you're going to just ignore the high E?

Why not just get a baritone and downtune that?
#8
Quote by Flying Couch
So, wait.

You're going to get a seven-string, so you can play downtuned stuff,but you will play it as though it were a six-string... so you're going to just ignore the high E?

Why not just get a baritone and downtune that?


Because i like the idea of being able to play standard tuning stuff and then go to b standard stuff without having to downtune it that much every time
#9
You'd be surprised at how quick you'll adapt to a 7, if you decide to take the plunge.

As for pups, Bare Knuckles are making the best 7s atm. Although you might want to look into some Lungdrens. Bear in mind w/ the Lungdrens you'll be in for a wait if you go w/ them.

As for the best 7s on the market, well your wallet will dictate what that will be. I think up to the $600 mark, Agiles are your best bet. If you can afford more, you might want to look into some Strickly 7s. I hear they are very good guitars for the money.

Scale-wise, 7s really aren't that big a deal. To adjust a scale to accommodate the extra B string, just play on it whatever you'd play on the high B string

Another thing you might want to consider when shopping for a 7 is scale length. Schecters run 26.5", and that's fine if you plan to keep it in B standard, but when I dropped my Hellraiser to A standard, the 26.5" scale wasn't cutting it.

But remember, 7s are just gateways to 8s!
#10
Yeah ive thought about 8 string aswell. But to me it seems like a pretty big monster of a guitar when the only stuff id like to play on 8 string is Meshuggah. But tell me more bout 8 strings
#11
Quote by Nightgaunt
You'd be surprised at how quick you'll adapt to a 7, if you decide to take the plunge.

As for pups, Bare Knuckles are making the best 7s atm. Although you might want to look into some Lungdrens. Bear in mind w/ the Lungdrens you'll be in for a wait if you go w/ them.

As for the best 7s on the market, well your wallet will dictate what that will be. I think up to the $600 mark, Agiles are your best bet. If you can afford more, you might want to look into some Strickly 7s. I hear they are very good guitars for the money.

Scale-wise, 7s really aren't that big a deal. To adjust a scale to accommodate the extra B string, just play on it whatever you'd play on the high B string

Another thing you might want to consider when shopping for a 7 is scale length. Schecters run 26.5", and that's fine if you plan to keep it in B standard, but when I dropped my Hellraiser to A standard, the 26.5" scale wasn't cutting it.

But remember, 7s are just gateways to 8s!


Hmm What would you recommend for a 8 string? Im willing to give up to 1500$
#12
It's funny, after you start playing a 7 or an 8 for a while, 6s feel like mandolins in comparison.

I went to an 8 after playing a 7 for a couple of years mostly because I just wanted to play lower than B standard and retain string tension.

Tuning on an 8 is generally F# B E A D G B E. Although some people like to drop the F# to E too.

Of course you don't necessarily have to use that tuning. Some people make the lowest string the B and add an extra high string.

As w/ 7s, if you're looking to pay under $700, go w/ an Agile. If you got more dough to spend, then look into one of the higher end Ibbys.

These, though, are hard to beat for the price,
http://www.rondomusic.com/8StringGuitars.html
Last edited by Nightgaunt at Sep 4, 2010,
#13
Not to jack this thread, but for the starting price the Carvin DC727/747 looks REALLY nice. I know the price goes up from there since it's a custom shop model, but since your budget is $1500 or less I'd definitely make a model online and see what it runs you.
#14
Quote by polishedbullet
Not to jack this thread, but for the starting price the Carvin DC727/747 looks REALLY nice. I know the price goes up from there since it's a custom shop model, but since your budget is $1500 or less I'd definitely make a model online and see what it runs you.



I forgot about those. Definitely worth checking out.

The only problem I remember hearing about those Carvins was that they were using smaller than standard routing for their pick-up cavities, which made pup swapping a real pain in the ass.

From what I hear now, that practice has, thankfully, been discontinued.
Last edited by Nightgaunt at Sep 5, 2010,
#15
Quote by Kruuse_51
Because i like the idea of being able to play standard tuning stuff and then go to b standard stuff without having to downtune it that much every time


Great, but bear in mind that a 7 string is tuned BEADGbe, whereas a 6 string tuned to B standard is BEADF#b. So there is a difference between the two. If you bought a hardtail 7 string, it wouldn't be hard to adjust the lower 6 strings to that, of course.

I would always recommend getting a 7 string, it opens up quite a lot of possibilities in terms of chord formations, scale runs, etc. Of course, I'm biased because I love them.
#16
I have an 8-string, it's no harder than a 6-string. You just need to learn to play it as the guitar it is, not a "6-string with an extra one down there, over there just a bit". You'll have to use that extra string and play them all, not treat it as a novel add-on you barely use. Integrate it into your playing.

It'll take a little while to get used to but a 7-string is fine for 6-string stuff. I do a lot of acoustic rhythm playing with my 8, it sounds good.
#17
Quote by Dayn
I have an 8-string, it's no harder than a 6-string. You just need to learn to play it as the guitar it is, not a "6-string with an extra one down there, over there just a bit". You'll have to use that extra string and play them all, not treat it as a novel add-on you barely use. Integrate it into your playing.

It'll take a little while to get used to but a 7-string is fine for 6-string stuff. I do a lot of acoustic rhythm playing with my 8, it sounds good.



may i ask what 8 string guitar that u own?
#18
Quote by polishedbullet
Not to jack this thread, but for the starting price the Carvin DC727/747 looks REALLY nice. I know the price goes up from there since it's a custom shop model, but since your budget is $1500 or less I'd definitely make a model online and see what it runs you.


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#22
Quote by teo_huat
may i ask what 8 string guitar that u own?

Ibanez RG2228. I've heard good things about Agile guitars though.