#1
I've recently been wondering if exercise has a long-term effect on vocals, either positive or negative; I've been in my high school's marching band for the past three years which requires alot of exercise and endurance, and I feel that my vocals have improved dramatically since then. Of course, that could just be due to aging and practice. Also, if I try singing immediately after a three-hour practice, I don't think I sound as strong. What do you think, does increasing physical exercise help or hurt one's vocal quality/ability? Or does it have no effect at all?
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#2
it'll increase your lungs ability to hold more air.
also, the fact that your singing has gotten better is probably related to the fact that you were exposed to so much musical training.
#3
Vocalists are encouraged to do 30mins of cardio every other day. Helps with breathing and lung capacity.
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#5
I suppose it would raise your stamina quite a bit so you could go longer on a breath, but it wouldn't affect your actual singing ability
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#6
Cardiovascular endurance and breath support are great for singing, as well as core strength and endurance, so anything that benefits those aspects of health will also help your singing a lot. Singing takes energy just like everything else does, so singing after a long marching band practice will be hard just like lifting weights is hard after a long football practice. Keep up the exercise, just be careful not to hurt yourself.
#7
Quote by EvilAngel93
I've been in my high school's marching band for the past three years which requires alot of exercise and endurance,


Come on man, it's the marching band not the football team. I'm saying this as a former sousaphone player mind you.

On topic, you are correct in your assumption. Certain exercise increases lung capacity, which can only aid you when you can take in more air and have longer stamina when singing.
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#8
Quote by Punk Poser
Come on man, it's the marching band not the football team. I'm saying this as a former sousaphone player mind you.

On topic, you are correct in your assumption. Certain exercise increases lung capacity, which can only aid you when you can take in more air and have longer stamina when singing.


Kudos to you for being a sousaphone, 'cause those things are damn heavy and this is coming from a bass clarinet, but we practice alot for a marching band. I pretty much have no life during the fall since most afterschool time is for outdoor rehearsals.

Thanks though. How would one best avoid hurting oneself vocally?
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Last edited by EvilAngel93 at Sep 4, 2010,
#9
What instrument do you play? If it's a wind instrument, the explanation is that you are accustomed to using your diaphragm to push the air through your instrument. Upon returning to the band (on saxophone) this year after 2 years away from it, I've noticed my diaphragm support got exponentially better.

Often times the reason for singers' lack of diaphragm support is simply putting the strain on the vocal chords rather than letting the diaphragm support the sound. When you're used to playing a wind instrument, you're used to letting the diaphragm support the sound, because you never strain your vocal chords playing wind instruments.

This may not be the case for everybody, but it is for me.

Quote by EvilAngel93
Thanks though. How would one best avoid hurting oneself vocally?
The best advice when it comes to this is "if it hurts, stop doing whatever you're doing."

You're gonna want to avoid straining your throat, keeping the resonance in the cavities in your head, and supporting your sound with your diaphragm.
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Last edited by food1010 at Sep 4, 2010,
#10
Quote by EvilAngel93
Kudos to you for being a sousaphone, 'cause those things are damn heavy and this is coming from a bass clarinet, but we practice alot for a marching band. I pretty much have no life during the fall since most afterschool time is for outdoor rehearsals.


Haha, I used to play bass clarinet during the concert band season. We didn't have marching bass clarinets in my band. I can only imagine the pain in the ass it would be to march around with a bass clarinet. Our band made bass clarinet players double for that reason and because the instruments are not cheap and would be prone to damage easily.
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