#1
I recently bought the Peavey XXL 212 combo amp.
I play guitar in one band and mainly concentrate on playing guitar, which is why i bought this amp. But i joined a band not too long ago where i play bass, and the amp i play out of for that band is a crappy 15 watt fender bass amp. Now im wondering if I could use this amp(my new amp) for my bass to play in this band. I just need to know, will it work? Or will it damage my amp? Is there a "maximum volume" I should set on my amp when playing bass through it?

tl;dr :
-Can i play a bass through a guitar amp? What is safe?

Thanks
Call Me NiDo
#3
if you're going to do it, turn the bass setting all the way down, and the low mid all the way down. but honestly, i wouldn't recommend it. haha
Last edited by Seanstrom at Sep 5, 2010,
#4
So basically make all the settings a lot lower then if i was playing guitar?
Call Me NiDo
#6
Quote by nidospiff
So basically make all the settings a lot lower then if i was playing guitar?

yeah, turn the lows and mids all the way down, and the treble up about half way. it'll sound like crap but it'll reduce the risk of ruining the speaker.

but i really wouldn't condone this sort of activity.
#7
This isn't a "it will work it'll just sound bad" situation, it's a "you will probably blow out the speaker on your amp" situation. Its not worth the risk
Quote by Iain.Peters
Guthrie Govan. 'nuff said.
#8
It's not the amp that you can't play a bass through, it's the speakers.
"In modern music, a lot of people are really stuck on the example, asif it were the idea. It takes millions of examples to articulate an idea, so don't get stuck on the f*cking example." - Joshua Homme, 2008.
#9
Ahh thanks guys. This sucks cause now i gotta rent a bass amp. Whatever. Thanks again
Call Me NiDo
#10
For christ sake if you value your amp at all you won't do it.
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ISP Decimator
MXR 10 Band EQ
Boss T-U3 Tuner Pedal
#11
So, does that mean that a bass cabinet plugged into a guitar head would work with no damage caused?
If so, that might be a cheaper alternative for TS.
#12
Yep, you can play a bass through a guitar amp into a bass cab, with no damage, but it'll probably sound like shit.
"In modern music, a lot of people are really stuck on the example, asif it were the idea. It takes millions of examples to articulate an idea, so don't get stuck on the f*cking example." - Joshua Homme, 2008.
#13
Quote by FuzzLove
Yep, you can play a bass through a guitar amp into a bass cab, with no damage, but it'll probably sound like shit.


lots of famous bassists do exactly this, especially in the studio.

it's been pretty common to run a bass through an old JCM...

really theres more to it than whats been said here. are you running stock speakers? if your speakers can handle significantly more wattage than the head puts out, you'd be fine. i.e. i have a 5w amp running through a 75w speaker, and i run a bass through it all the time.

also, something to keep in mind is that its going to sound a LOT quieter than a guitar would. this will lead to you turning up the volume, therefore abusing the speakers even more.

generally its not a good idea. at the very least i'd recommend getting a bass cab, but really a bass amp doesnt have to be expensive... ive always thought the roland bass cube was a very nice amp, and it can be had pretty cheap. cheaper than a nice cab for sure, and it'll be plenty loud and sound good. just a thought.
#14
Didn't Lemmy from Motorhead do this back in the days? Or am I completely wrong? :P
Yeargh i'm cursed!
#15
Quote by wrongmessage
Didn't Lemmy from Motorhead do this back in the days? Or am I completely wrong? :P


Chris Squire did, But I think he still used a bass cab.
#16
Quote by lordrcceaser
This isn't a "it will work it'll just sound bad" situation, it's a "you will probably blow out the speaker on your amp" situation. Its not worth the risk


Ya, its just not worth it. I have heard of people doing it, but I sure wouldn't risk it.
***Guitars***
Epiphone Les Paul Custom AP (w/ 2 Seymour Duncans)
Jackson Dx10D Dinky (w/ DiMarzio PAF Bridge)
Epihpone Hummingbird

***Amps***
Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 100 (Voodoo Modified)
Custom 4x12 Halfstack (w/ Veteran 30's)
#18
The Orange Thunderverb doubles as a bass amp fyi. As stated, you can damage the speakers but with a bass extension cab you should be ok. Might not be enough headroom for bass though
#19
Quote by josephde
really theres more to it than whats been said here. are you running stock speakers? if your speakers can handle significantly more wattage than the head puts out, you'd be fine. i.e. i have a 5w amp running through a 75w speaker, and i run a bass through it all the time.

also, something to keep in mind is that its going to sound a LOT quieter than a guitar would. this will lead to you turning up the volume, therefore abusing the speakers even more.


good job josephde! i am sick of hearing people spew the common consensus on this issue.

joseph brings up key issues. lets tie some together with a little more info.

1. guitar speakers are made to be more sensitive, this means that guitar speakers use thinner and lighter parts at critical connection areas than what they use for bass speakers. this is an important key difference between bass and guitar speakers. also...

2. guitar speakers usually have a higher impedance than bass speakers. if you look at frequency response curves of speakers the effect of nominal impedance rating on sound becomes much more obvious. but to summarize, the trend is that speakers with lower nominal impedance tend to have a more flat frequency response curve. this means lower impedance speakers don't work as hard to create low end. (aside, it is common in studio work to use 16 ohm cabs for guitar so as to help attenuate lower end and keep the guitar off the bass's 'toes' so to speak).

3. greater speaker surface area = more even-sounding low end response. this has to do with the property of how much more air bigger speakers push, and a bit indirectly with how big speakers weight more and make it more difficult to effectively move the surface fast enough for accurate recreation of high frequency notes. also, speakers hooked in parallel have a greater effective surface area (increasing low end response) while maintaining all the high end fidelity (hence why 4 ohm 4x10's are popular for bass)

4. you ear has different frequency response curves at different volumes/spl's. the louder the noise is the more even the frequency response (this makes the bass sound louder in comparison to the mix)

so, guitar speakers are usually looser, lower power handling, with a higher impedance. you would need the drive the high impedance guitar speaker to a loud volume in an effort to make a frequency response curve not optimized for low end work with bass. the speaker is lighter and more sensitive and the speaker's excursion (movement back and forth) will become more exagerated with the higher volume and eventually the lighter connection points on the speaker fail.

whereas bass speakers are made of thicker and more rigid material, with an impedance optimized for better low end response. you won't need to drive the speaker as hard to get the low end so the speaker will be less stressed.

this is where you can have guitar speakers acting as bass speakers, if you have plenty of power handling/sufficiently stiff parts and low enough impedance, then it is quite possible to use guitar speakers for bass speakers.

The Orange Thunderverb doubles as a bass amp fyi. As stated, you can damage the speakers but with a bass extension cab you should be ok. Might not be enough headroom for bass though


the thunderverb 200 has the HP (high power) 4x12 that runs G12K-100 speakers. the purpose of the PPC 412HP 8 cab is to facilitate the thunderverb200 for it's applications. in other words, that cab is intended to be used for bass and guitar.

with my experience, the G12K-100/85 would be one of the 'cross-over' guitar/bass speakers that can play double duty. so can a EVM-12L and a number of others.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at Sep 6, 2010,
#20
Quote by gumbilicious
good job josephde! i am sick of hearing people spew the common consensus on this issue.

joseph brings up key issues. lets tie some together with a little more info.

1. guitar speakers are made to be more sensitive, this means that guitar speakers use thinner and lighter parts at critical connection areas than what they use for bass speakers. this is an important key difference between bass and guitar speakers. also...

2. guitar speakers usually have a higher impedance than bass speakers. if you look at frequency response curves of speakers the effect of nominal impedance rating on sound becomes much more obvious. but to summarize, the trend is that speakers with lower nominal impedance tend to have a more flat frequency response curve. this means lower impedance speakers don't work as hard to create low end. (aside, it is common in studio work to use 16 ohm cabs for guitar so as to help attenuate lower end and keep the guitar off the bass's 'toes' so to speak).

3. greater speaker surface area = more even-sounding low end response. this has to do with the property of how much more air bigger speakers push, and a bit indirectly with how big speakers weight more and make it more difficult to effectively move the surface fast enough for accurate recreation of high frequency notes. also, speakers hooked in parallel have a greater effective surface area (increasing low end response) while maintaining all the high end fidelity (hence why 4 ohm 4x10's are popular for bass)

4. you ear has different frequency response curves at different volumes/spl's. the louder the noise is the more even the frequency response (this makes the bass sound louder in comparison to the mix)

so, guitar speakers are usually looser, lower power handling, with a higher impedance. you would need the drive the high impedance guitar speaker to a loud volume in an effort to make a frequency response curve not optimized for low end work with bass. the speaker is lighter and more sensitive and the speaker's excursion (movement back and forth) will become more exagerated with the higher volume and eventually the lighter connection points on the speaker fail.

whereas bass speakers are made of thicker and more rigid material, with an impedance optimized for better low end response. you won't need to drive the speaker as hard to get the low end so the speaker will be less stressed.

this is where you can have guitar speakers acting as bass speakers, if you have plenty of power handling/sufficiently stiff parts and low enough impedance, then it is quite possible to use guitar speakers for bass speakers.


the thunderverb 200 has the HP (high power) 4x12 that runs G12K-100 speakers. the purpose of the PPC 412HP 8 cab is to facilitate the thunderverb200 for it's applications. in other words, that cab is intended to be used for bass and guitar.

with my experience, the G12K-100/85 would be one of the 'cross-over' guitar/bass speakers that can play double duty. so can a EVM-12L and a number of others.

Yeah I wasn't referring to the matching orange cab rather standard "guitar" cabs
#21
What you have to worry about is tearing the speaker, not “blowing” it. If you play low notes at high volume and a fast tempo one bass hit can build up air pressure just behind the speaker, and when a successive bass hit causes the speaker to contact that air it just pressurized, the speaker can tear. So just keep the volume down.

But a bass cabinet will probably sound better.