#1
Can anybody give me an easy but nice sounding solo to practice that doesnt require effects etc..?
#6
Avenged Sevenfold - Warmness of the Soul.
Metallica - The Unforgiven

If you want to get better at solos too, practice licks of a solo rather than the whole thing.
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#8
whilst it`s fine to learn a solo it`s even better to learn what scales are used in the solo you are learning, that being said and judging by the gear you have listed in your profile, go for nothing else matters, learn the Em scale (E aeolian) and Em pentatonic
Last edited by ibanezgod1973 at Sep 5, 2010,
#9
Dream Theater - Repentance

Not a very hard solo, yet very impressive sounding and it's great for building up easy techniques that will make your playing sound much better.
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#10
Quote by ibanezgod1973
whilst it`s fine to learn a solo it`s even better to learn what scales are used in the solo you are learning, that being said and judging by the gear you have listed in your profile, go for nothing else matters, learn the Em scale (E aeolian) and Em pentatonic


The scale does almost nothing for you. Learning scales and only scales early on traps you in a box, if you will, that limits what you play and how you play it. At the end of the day, a scale is just a name for a collection of notes, not a guide for how to play something (though people still seem confused about this one!).In this case, the Em scale and the Em pentatonic scale will do you no good and probably confuse you, TS. They won't make you sound good immediately. Learning scales makes you face the chance of just running up and down the scale, not really playing anything, per se.

I'd recommend the opposite of this idea: learn as many solos as you can of whatever genre you feel like playing to get a better handle on the phrasing used. How you play notes is just as important as what notes you play.

Easy solos that sounds good:
-First two solos in One by Metallica
-First solo in Fade to Black also by Metallica
-Unforgiven also also by Metallica
-Drapery Falls by Opeth*
-Bleak also by Opeth*
-Dying in Your Arms by Trivium**

*These two can be a bit of a challenge thanks to the phrasing and the jumps on the neck, but they aren't particularly tough if you give them some practice.
**This one's a more challenging proposition, but it sounds great if you can nail it. There's some fast picking involved, so you might have to shelve this one for a little while if it proves to be too much.

All of that said, don't just learn solos to impress people. Learning the whole song sounds better and teaches you more than some just a few flashy moves.
#11
@geldin you learn the scale so that understanding and interpreting the solo is easier, it`s only players without the creative element that get trapped in the box, it`s one thing knowing the scale and another thing to use it. in order to use the scale you apply techniques to your scale usage.

other than that use the best to pieces of gear you have....your ears
#12
Quote by ibanezgod1973
@geldin you learn the scale so that understanding and interpreting the solo is easier, it`s only players without the creative element that get trapped in the box, it`s one thing knowing the scale and another thing to use it. in order to use the scale you apply techniques to your scale usage.

other than that use the best to pieces of gear you have....your ears


When you're first starting out, as I'm assuming TS is, understanding the theory and whatnot behind a solo is a secondary concern to learning something that sounds impressive. Besides, unless he's transcribing by ear, which I doubt he's doing, knowing the scale(s) being used is useless information for him.
#13
Quote by Geldin
When you're first starting out, as I'm assuming TS is, understanding the theory and whatnot behind a solo is a secondary concern to learning something that sounds impressive. Besides, unless he's transcribing by ear, which I doubt he's doing, knowing the scale(s) being used is useless information for him.

me transcribing by ear is like a fat kid not eating cake... not happening....im not that good at hearing pitches etc
anyways....i just wanna do some solos that are nice but take some talent. i shouldve put this in at the top but the best i can do is play seek and destroy by metallica minus the bridge and solo part
#14
Quote by Geldin
When you're first starting out, as I'm assuming TS is, understanding the theory and whatnot behind a solo is a secondary concern to learning something that sounds impressive. Besides, unless he's transcribing by ear, which I doubt he's doing, knowing the scale(s) being used is useless information for him.

You make it seem that you don't have the slightest clue about what a scale actually is. Learning scales doesn't trap you anywhere, it simply helps you understand music better. Just learning arbitrary chunks of scale patterns without looking at the theory behind them, arguably yes that's not so much use. But that's a result of bad practices and poor teaching - if you only practice playing scales then that's what you'll learn to do, rather than focussing on understading scales and learning how to actually use them.

Understanding scales is a great help when learning new stuff, even from tab. The better you understand music the easier the learning process will be for anything new. And a "beginner's concerns" are somewhat moot, seeing as the less experienced and knowledgeable about a subject you are the less qualified you are to make a decision on what it is you should and shouldn't be doing.
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#15
dude nice seagull and what your saying is learn the scales before i try to learn solos?
#16
He's saying if you know the scales inside and out, like knowing how to play up and down the box as well as up and down the neck, then you can play in that scale everywhere on the guitar. You just have to follow your ear then and decide if you want to go higher or lower and the scale will assure you hit a good note.

Its up to you to practice to hit those perfect, sweet sounding notes.
#17
Listen to what steven_seagull said. Scales add structure to your playing -- they aid in your understanding of the fretboard and how notes relate to eachother. As an example, say you hear this solo being played in A minor pentatonic. If you want to figure out how to play this by ear then knowing the scale helps because all of a sudden you have only 5 notes to choose from, not 12!
#18
Ok so I know there is the major scale. So can u mov these shapes around and keep them the same or will you hav to change the shapes around. There's also minor scales? Where would an ideal site be to find these scales and learn them ?
#19
you can move the shapes to different areas on the fretboard to make the same scale in a different key.

every scale has 5 positions

what tune from those that we recommended have you decided on
i stongly reccommend this book for learning as using as a reference to the most common scales
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gig-Bag-Book-Scales-Guitarists/dp/0825615755/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1283806405&sr=1-1-spell