#1
So ive been playing about 4-5 months and ive just recently started seriously practicing my scales and improvising them. Ive actually made riffs/progressions which sound really good but i keep finding myself uncomfortable moving out of the "box" positions in scales. I know all the different positions of scales, i just have trouble transitioning. Any advice? I really dont want to turn into a one dimensional player.

Btw, i play anything from rock to metal so im typically playing with alot of distortion if that matters in this situation.
Last edited by -Kr0n1c- at Sep 5, 2010,
#2
I have somewhat the same problem. The only thing that really helped me on that was learning all the notes on the fretboard and studying something called the circle of fifths. Im afraid that all and its very confusing to understand. Something Im still finding a solution for.
#3
Quote by MusicsMyHero
I have somewhat the same problem. The only thing that really helped me on that was learning all the notes on the fretboard and studying something called the circle of fifths. Im afraid that all and its very confusing to understand. Something Im still finding a solution for.


The circle of fifths is completely useless at this stage. You'll want to know the notes on your fretboard en how to make scales. Furthermore, you'll want to know which scales you can use over which chord(s) (progressions).
I do not want to have a signature anymore.
#4
Try practising the scales in many ways; up and down the strings in different positions, but also through the whole fretboard on one or two strings at a time. It helps you see the scales sort of "lenght-wise", so you can link the boxes better. Also try to come up with some kind of licks to transition between boxes, that helped me at least. Also, if you are learning a written solo for some song, try to see what scale positions the solo utilises etc, it helped me remember the different positions quite well.
All in all, just concentrate on learning scales as notes around the fretboard after you've mastered the boxes, and try to utilise the whole fretboard when soloing
#5
Dont compromise on technique. I always rushed into solos and scales and licks etc, but now, I'm having to teach myself proper technique all over again. I can improvise, play intermediate stuff, but to really break into the crazy shit, you have to keep your technique tight.

There are a lot of lessons here that will help you out ( a couple that really added to my playing were some technique lessons by freepower and this one lesson on scales and modes which gives you all the modes of a scale over the whole fret board).

Other than that, listen to whats happening! If you cannot understand whats happening in the chord progression, then you wont know what to play. Some people might even argue, that you dont need to know the theory behind scales and chords if you can just hear whats happening. Try jamming along with tracks you like. Try working out the chords. Know the major scale at least so you can understand the fundamentals of chord progressions. Then just hear what you want to play and find it on the guitar. When you can do some of this together, you'll be able to improvise.
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#6
Quote by -Kr0n1c-
[...] I know all the different positions of scales, i just have trouble transitioning. Any advice? I really dont want to turn into a one dimensional player.

Btw, i play anything from rock to metal so im typically playing with alot of distortion if that matters in this situation.


There are really two problems here. The first is a practical one where you have trouble transitioning between scale positions. The second one is that you believe that if you don't know how to transition and connect the whole fretboard you are going to turn into a one-dimensional player.

Let me tell you that the latter is essentially a non-issue. For years (and even now still sometimes) I knew the different positions of the scales, but had trouble connecting them together. I saw each position as a little `island' on the fretboard which had certain licks attached to it. Each island was separate from the other, with the exception of some bridging licks. That didn't stop me from improvising a lot of interesting stuff. All the videos that I have up on Youtube were played this way. (See http://www.youtube.com/user/wdboer0).

As for transition exercises, it helps learning licks that connect two positions. You are essentially building a bridge from one position to the other. The more licks you know, the stronger this bridge until eventually you see the entire fretboard.

Hope this helps!