#1
I have to study this classical piece for my Leaving Cert music test (the leaving cert is a big exam you do at the end of your last year in secondary school in Ireland)

Its absolutely insane. Its called "Piano Quartet" by Gerald Barry, an Irish composer.

I couldn't find it anywhere online so I had to upload it myself, Here's the link!

Give it a listen!! Try to listen to all of it please, its about 12 mins long. The start of it is pretty bearable, but it changes, oh god does it change.

There's elements of Irish music in it, and a lot of sudden changes. I think my music teacher said there was over 100 time changes in it, and there's a 1/16 bar in it!!

Opinions? And maybe some ideas of how I am supposed to be able to answer questions on this bloody thing!?
#2
Well that was... weird. But at least you didn't have to analyze Penderecki's Threnody. Any clues what the questions will be like?
#3
Quote by T.s.e
Well that was... weird. But at least you didn't have to analyze Penderecki's Threnody. Any clues what the questions will be like?


Usually they're to do with structure, instrumentation, key, techniques etc.

Forgot to say in OP: apparently the guy is ridiculously specific, at the top of the score it has the tempo (which is 108 dotted minims per minute) and it says "Not Slower!" next to it with a ****ing exclamation mark!!
#4
its extremely confusing sounding at times. it sounds like someone took 2 pieces and layered them on top of eachother
Last edited by rickyj at Sep 5, 2010,
#5
Quote by rickyj
its extremely confusing sounding at times. it sounds like someone took 2 pieces and layered them on top of eachother

This but done by a 2nd grader
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#6
Quote by izbbass
This but done by a 2nd grader



it works at times, but some of it sounds like someone gave helen keller a jackhammer and a piano.
#7
just listening to the beginning i kinda like it.
it seems like he took the planning for this very seriously.
All instruments meant to be played on time and not a margin of error could be acceptable.
its as if the 3 main groups(that i've heard) assigned parts were then split and divided up to the others.
The clashing instruments are in fact completing each other, IMO.
it seems he tried to do this exact thing for multiple songs, but decided to add them into one song, hence the sudden changes in time.

then again he's irish so he could've been drunk
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#8
Quote by shanchett99
just listening to the beginning i kinda like it.
it seems like he took the planning for this very seriously.
All instruments meant to be played on time and not a margin of error could be acceptable.
its as if the 3 main groups(that i've heard) assigned parts were then split and divided up to the others.
The clashing instruments are in fact completing each other, IMO.
it seems he tried to do this exact thing for multiple songs, but decided to add them into one song, hence the sudden changes in time.

then again he's irish so he could've been drunk


Hahaha what a post.

Another fact I forgot: The piano player uses a technique called "Clusters" (or something like that) where he tries to hit as many notes as possible.

Does anyone else think the piano solo at 6:30 is pretty awesome?
#9
Weird. 0.o


No other opinions on it other then that.

SlayingEdit:

Imagine Dream Theater doing a cover of this song.


Last edited by SlayingDragons at Sep 5, 2010,
#11
Quote by WhiskeyFace
Usually they're to do with structure, instrumentation, key, techniques etc.

Forgot to say in OP: apparently the guy is ridiculously specific, at the top of the score it has the tempo (which is 108 dotted minims per minute) and it says "Not Slower!" next to it with a ****ing exclamation mark!!


Find out as much as you can about the track (ask a friend if your lazy)
And memorize it.
#12
Quote by WhiskeyFace
I have to study this classical piece for my Leaving Cert music test (the leaving cert is a big exam you do at the end of your last year in secondary school in Ireland)

Its absolutely insane. Its called "Piano Quartet" by Gerald Barry, an Irish composer.

I couldn't find it anywhere online so I had to upload it myself, Here's the link!

Give it a listen!! Try to listen to all of it please, its about 12 mins long. The start of it is pretty bearable, but it changes, oh god does it change.

There's elements of Irish music in it, and a lot of sudden changes. I think my music teacher said there was over 100 time changes in it, and there's a 1/16 bar in it!!

Opinions? And maybe some ideas of how I am supposed to be able to answer questions on this bloody thing!?

I haven't listened to it yet, but I love 20th century classical, so I'll probably dig it. You said it has tone clusters? Awesome.

And yeah, 20th and 21st century classical often has some absolutely looney tunes time signatures. 1/16 is nothing. Have you ever heard of irrational meter? That's stuff like 5/7 and 3/10. Don't ask me how you play in those, because I haven't the slightest idea.
#13
Quote by Holy Katana
I haven't listened to it yet, but I love 20th century classical, so I'll probably dig it. You said it has tone clusters? Awesome.

And yeah, 20th and 21st century classical often has some absolutely looney tunes time signatures. 1/16 is nothing. Have you ever heard of irrational meter? That's stuff like 5/7 and 3/10. Don't ask me how you play in those, because I haven't the slightest idea.


This piece changes time signature over 100 times. Im pretty sure there are some of those in there
#14
Quote by WhiskeyFace
This piece changes time signature over 100 times. Im pretty sure there are some of those in there

Are they all different time signatures, though?
Last edited by Holy Katana at Sep 5, 2010,
#16
You weren't kidding when you said it had Irish elements in it. It's like Celtic music seen through a funhouse mirror.

It's pretty cool so far. Some parts of it remind me of Messiaen, who is one of my favorite composers.
Last edited by Holy Katana at Sep 5, 2010,
#18
Quote by WhiskeyFace
Does anyone else think the piano solo at 6:30 is pretty awesome?

Not really. And I'm into this kinda music. The piano at 6:30 comes way to abruptly imo, and sounds like gay clowns.
MATTERHORN
#19
We had to do Seachanges last year for the Leaving cert. Appearantly the composer Raymond Deane was mates with the dudes that make the course so it got put on.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=41XrSLNbasA

How in the name of God does this qualify as music? And we had to study it! Never wrote so much bulls*** for that exam in my life.
#21
Quote by WhiskeyFace
Abruptness is clearly a huge part of this piece.

Yes, but 6:30 is too radical for my tastes.
MATTERHORN
#22
Not to be an ass, but that song is really boring sounding. I mean, I understand the kind of skill that would take to play it as it is, but that doesn't makes it any more bearable.

*inb4 flaming for not liking what everybody else thinks is awesome*
#25
Quote by WhiskeyFace
Post when you're done listening to all of it and tell me what you think

I liked it. It was pretty intense stuff. Why exactly are they making you analyze this particular piece? Are you going to have to do a harmonic analysis of it?

You'd probably have to use set theory for that, which is something I don't know a whole lot about. It deals with things called pitch class sets, which are various collections of notes arranged into groups. I'd try to explain it, but this site does a much better job of it: http://www.jaytomlin.com/music/settheory/help.html

Not that you need to know anything about set theory; I just thought you may find it interesting.

Apparently this piece was composed in 1992. I haven't listened to too many classical pieces that are younger than I am; the only other ones I've heard were this one piece about water that had a synth part and was performed by the YouTube Symphony Orchestra, and the other is On the Transmigration of Souls by John Adams. Both of those are actually pretty easy listens. I recommend both.

Quote by MG_Sora
Not to be an ass, but that song is really boring sounding. I mean, I understand the kind of skill that would take to play it as it is, but that doesn't makes it any more bearable.

*inb4 flaming for not liking what everybody else thinks is awesome*

That's pretty much how I feel about BTBAM. As such, I love your sig, even though I like some prog.

I like this because it's strikingly original, and has some very colorful, albeit very dissonant, harmonies. It's not the technical aspect I'm particularly interested in, although that's pretty cool, too.
Last edited by Holy Katana at Sep 5, 2010,
#26
Quote by Holy Katana
I liked it. It was pretty intense stuff. Why exactly are they making you analyze this particular piece? Are you going to have to do a harmonic analysis of it?

You'd probably have to use set theory for that, which is something I don't know a whole lot about. It deals with things called pitch class sets, which are various collections of notes arranged into groups. I'd try to explain it, but this site does a much better job of it: http://www.jaytomlin.com/music/settheory/help.html

Not that you need to know anything about set theory; I just thought you may find it interesting.

Apparently this piece was composed in 1992. I haven't listened to too many classical pieces that are younger than I am; the only other ones I've heard were this one piece about water that had a synth part and was performed by the YouTube Symphony Orchestra, and the other is On the Transmigration of Souls by John Adams. Both of those are actually pretty easy listens. I recommend both.


We have a few set works we have to study. Tchaikovsky's Romeo and Juliet fantasy overture, a Bach Cantata, Bohemian Rhapsody, and this.

I guess its just for varitey, and hes irish.

Although ever year studies different set works and theres always a weird one and the composer is always Irish. I dont know if this music is an Irish thing or if they just spend years looking for the stuff ha
#27
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n4tJKh__fak

That's the YouTube Symphony Orchestra video I was talking about. Apparently it's not about water, and I must have gotten it confused with something else. Also, I'm really surprised my comment on the video is one of the highest rated comments.
#29
Aw man, sucks to be you. I have to study Bach's Cantata 78, which isn't that bad.
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#31
I felt like the song was going to give me a heart attack.

longing rusted furnace daybreak seventeen benign nine homecoming one freight car
#32
also, theres not enough cowbell
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#33
So far i am about 2 minutes in, nothing too weird so far, but i can imagine it taking a turn for the insane, it has a very unstable feel to it, plus i got that from some of the comments on here.

You should break it down into sections, if it is too hard to identify recurring sections that are large enough to have their own labels (A and B, etc), break it down by track time or possibly bars.
WHOMP

Think of that next time you are not allowed to laugh.
#34
Quote by WhiskeyFace
We have to do that aswell. We have 4 set works. Are you in sixth year?


Yeah, just gone in. I know we have Bach and Queen.
❝Don't be afraid of death, but of an inadequate life❞
Bertolt Bretcht


#35
Quote by WhiskeyFace
Yeah that was weird too.

Okay, then. Here's a piece by Steve Reich for guitar, bass, and tape (electromagnetic tape, that is) called Electric Counterpoint, played by jazz guitarist Pat Metheny: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1sX4jqylYDU

Part 2:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vvBIXAVHsiM

Yeah, it kinda sounds like post-rock, but that's because post-rock is heavily influenced by minimalism.

Don't tell me this is weird, too. The only thing that's unusual about this is the use of tape loops.