#1
Hey I love the Songwriter and HD-28, I have played both at my local guitar center, but im not sure which one to choose i know the songwriter has more treble whereas the hd-28 has more bass, please help, im going insane haha
Alex Hager - AlexHagerMusic
#2
You are comparing two very high-end guitars; both of them practically the flagships of their respective brands (Yes, they both make far more expensive guitars, but those are mostly limited editions. These two are the top-of-the-line workhorses). As a result, you can't go wrong with either one.

There is nothing to say about the Martin HD-28 that hasn't already been said a thousand times. The guitar is the standard by which all others are judged. There is absolutely no downside to it other than its high price.

The Gibson Songwriter is a perfect example of just how good a Gibson acoustic guitar can be when they put their minds to doing it right. It has a fantastic tone and is very, very playable. The Martin probably rings out better as a result of its bracing, but I prefer the way the Songwriter plays. The Martin will definitely hold its value better if you are into horse-trading your guitars.

http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Martin-HD28-Standard-Dreadnought-Acoustic?sku=514754

http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Gibson-Songwriter-Deluxe-Custom-AcousticElectric-Guitar?sku=580337

You pays your money and you makes your choice. We should all be burdened with such choices.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#3
I say go with the HD, but i am bias...
flintazra wrote:

I think the next person to shoot up a school should list Jonas brothers and Hannah Montana as his favorite "musicians."
#5
get a gibson j-45. it's the perfect compromise - a great sounding, great feeling gibson with plenty of bass.

or else i suggest you go to guitar center every week, play both of them plus some other guitars, compare the same songs on them, and eventually chances are you'll discover a preference for one or the other - if not sound, then neck shape that makes it easier to finger chords or something.