#1
Hi guys im looking into maybe getting a Mesa Single Rec 50w head. Im not going for the Dual Rectifier as its too pricey for me at the mo -
So just wondered; is the 50w head any good for metal? is it loud enough for gigs? should i save my pennies for a dual? most heads ive had have been 100w+ so im a bit worried about getting something less that 100w. Maybe this fear is unfounded. Any help would be welcome.
Thanks
#2
All the Recs excel at metal, definitely one of the most solid choices for high gain amps.

Yeah its definitely loud enough for gigs, if your gigs are big enough you might have to mic it through a PA. But otherwise 50w its damn loud.

I'd personally save up for the Dual rec, seeing as it has a bit more balls to it tbh.
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Quote by steve_muse
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#3
Thanks for that. When you say the Dual rec has more balls; do you mean it has more gain? or simply because its 100w it therefore has more headroom?
#4
Quote by METALKIRK
When you say the Dual rec has more balls; do you mean it has more gain? or simply because its 100w it therefore has more headroom?

I hear the Dual Rec isn't necessarily more gainy, but just sounds a bit bigger, fatter, heavier. Also, comparing a 100-watt tube head to a 50-watt one, the difference in volume isn't even all that big. With big tube amps, the wattage affects the sonic properties of the amp more than it does the overall volume.
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#6
I find its bass and gain is just VERY slightly reduced in singles, probably due to the fact that the single has SS rectification as opposed to the dual and triple with tube rectification.

So all the difference is just the recitification and watts. I dont think it will make much difference though especially once you crank it up.

But then again here in the UK there is an £800 difference between single and dual, and i think that saving that extra bit more cash will not justify that amount of cash for the dual. So i'd in fact retract my statement about saving for a dual, unless you're swimming in cash.
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Quote by steve_muse
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#7
Yep i live in the Uk also; im able to get a used Single Rec for 700£; though for a dual youd be looking a at least double that. So im wondering whether that bit of ectra gain is really worth another 700£... :-)
#8
Thats insanely cheap, i've seen single recs for only 1.4k, and duals for 2.2k. Im sure you're better off spending the money that you would have spent on the dual on a better cab or something.
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Quote by steve_muse
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#9
Ive got a marshall 1960a cab i recently purchased 2nd hand also and its great; Just really tempted by a single rec at 700£ hence why i wanted to see what you guys thought of a 50w head as ive always owned 100w+
#10
To clear things up:

The Rectifier series does NOT excel at metal, I've heard enough guys who usually only play vintage (or vintage style) amps and tell how great the Rectos sound for Classic and Hard Rock.

The additional gain and low end on the Dual Recto comes from the bigger headroom which you get from 100W. Most amps with 50 and 100W versions are the same.

On the Dual Recto the rectifier can be switched from tube to solid state, not sure about the Single.
However, the tube rectifier adds something that's called sag, it's hard to explain but it works better for classic rock and bluesy stuff, for high gain a SS rectifier is supposed to be better.
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#11
Ah ok thanks for that - personally id want to stick with a tube head for my gain; ive played through SS amps before and yes they have their time and place but for me, im just hooked on tubes. Im just unsure as to whether the extra gain the 100w rectifier produces is actually worth the extra £700
#12
Quote by METALKIRK
Ah ok thanks for that - personally id want to stick with a tube head for my gain; ive played through SS amps before and yes they have their time and place but for me, im just hooked on tubes. Im just unsure as to whether the extra gain the 100w rectifier produces is actually worth the extra £700

SS rectifier doesn't mean SS amp.

I'm talking not talking about Mesa Rectifiers but rectifiers in amps.
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#14
Quote by adj209
I find its bass and gain is just VERY slightly reduced in singles, probably due to the fact that the single has SS rectification as opposed to the dual and triple with tube rectification.

So all the difference is just the recitification and watts. I dont think it will make much difference though especially once you crank it up.

If anything, it works the other way. SS rectification is much more efficient than the 5U4-type tube rectification that the Rectifiers boast. I prefer the tube rectification personally, anyway. However, silicon diodes are MUCH more authoritative and punchy than vacuum tubes, which is why you find that the majority of high gain amps nowadays don't bother with tube rectification.
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#15
I know someone who uses a single rec for shows. He got a GOOD metal sound when jamming with a bud of mine. It wasn't the loose and saggy recto gain people talk about that needs an eq or tubescreamer to tighten. It was already tight and punchy sounding. A lot of articulate riffing came out clear and snappy. I actually think it mislead my friend into thinking ALL mesa rectifiers sound like that. I guess the dude must have tweaked it inside out to make it sound like that though.
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#16
listen to a metallica album. rectos are amazing for metal.

and dude, 50 tube watts are more than enough for a gig. jesus. especially if your running it through more than a 1x12.
#17
I'm pretty sure that a lot of the Mesa tone was coming from a Mark rather than a recto? I also thought Marshall was somewhere in the mix? I'm not really an expert, but I was sure the more famous tones were mostly Mesa Mark ll with a bit of Marshall???
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#18
Quote by sg4ever
I'm pretty sure that a lot of the Mesa tone was coming from a Mark rather than a recto? I also thought Marshall was somewhere in the mix? I'm not really an expert, but I was sure the more famous tones were mostly Mesa Mark ll with a bit of Marshall???


I had also heard that they used a JCM 800 for the Kill Em' All album, but I'm not sure.
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#19
I had the single rec combo at one point, didn't care for it too much. Actually thought it was better for hard rock or crunch kinda stuff than modern metal. Copied the info below from the sneap forum, take a look


Mesa/Boogie

The Single Rectifier sounds least like the Dual and Triple Rectifiers. It is in most cases considered the weakest and fizziest of the bunch. The circuitry is different from the Dual and Triple Rectifiers.

The Two Channel Dual/Triple Rectifiers and Dual Rectifier Rackmount all have the same circuitry and sound so similar that you can dial them all in to have nearly 100% the same tone. The Dual Rectifier Rackmount sounds most different from it's bretheren because the circuit board is physically smaller and the components are closer together.

The Three Channel Dual/Triple Rectifiers sound exactly the same minus the amount of clean headroom, which may affect the response of the amp to sound slightly more "squishy." The circuitry is supposedly identical.

The 2010 Multi Watt Three Channel Dual/Triple Rectifiers have an improved clean/pushed channel and assignable diode/tube tracking as well as a 50/100/150(where applicable) watt switch for each channel.

The Dual Rectifier Roadster is voiced darker and is slighly tighter than the Three Channel Dual Rectifier.

The Dual Rectifier Road King (I and II) supposedly has identical circuitry to the Three Channel Dual Rectifier, but having more components stuffed on the circuit board will definitely effect the sound ever so slightly.

The Three Channel Dual/Triple Rectifiers are slightly brighter and more aggressive than their Two Channel counterparts. You can dial these amps in to sound almost exactly the same as the Two Channel versions. The biggest differences are noted in the Two Channel versions had transformer and slight circuit revisions in the early numbers.

Supposedly the earliest two channel Dual/Triple Rectifiers from around '92/'93 had circuits that were nearly identical to the Soldano SLO100 give or take values on a few components. These are considered the "Holy Grail" of the Rectifier series. The amps have been voiced less favorably since then according to discriminating Boogie enthusiasts.
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