#1
I've got a Whammy IV, and I'm wondering wheter or not playing with it in a 1 octave down setting would destroy my speakers?

Not as a regular type of playing, but for trying out some riffs real low, and some dark cleans. The amp is a 65w double speaker. Is it safe to play this regularly on a regular amp?
Fender Jaguar
Morley PVO +
TC Polytune
Fulltone Ultimate Octave
Boss DS2
Blackstar HT-40
Digitech Timebender
TC Trinity

(offboard; Whammy IV, Crybaby 535Q, Digitech RP100A)
#2
Meshuggah use normal guitar amplifiers, and they're at F#2 (A tone away from the lowest string of a bass). So it shouldn't be too bad in theory... But I'm not extremely knowledgeable about this kind of thing...
#4
Quote by nightraven
it's fine, using an octave pedal isn't the same as using a bass guitar


why? i have heard this claim over and over again. why is taking a ~80 hz low E and lowering it to 40 hz with an ocatave pedal different from playing 40 hz on a bass? beyond the obvious differences in harmonics and overtones. from what i understand, many responses from a speaker are dependent on frequency, i don't see how you can change the frequency of a note with an octave device and still have a speaker act the same way as if you weren't using it.

i have heard that using a ocatave pedal is different, but i have yet to hear 1 good reason why.

edit: at TS, i wouldn't worry about hurting anything. while people warn all day long that it might cause damage we have yet to find a single person who has 'shredded' their amp using an octave, harmonizer, pitch shift or whammy pedal.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at Sep 6, 2010,
#5
Ok, that's what I wanted to hear!

Thanks guys!
Fender Jaguar
Morley PVO +
TC Polytune
Fulltone Ultimate Octave
Boss DS2
Blackstar HT-40
Digitech Timebender
TC Trinity

(offboard; Whammy IV, Crybaby 535Q, Digitech RP100A)
#6
Quote by nightraven
what i have heard is that it's to do with the vibrations of the thicker bass guitar strings. take it with a pinch of salt though, but i've never ever heard of an instance where an octave pedal has damaged a speaker.


i have heard the thicker strings thing, i've also heard that cuz the strings are longer they vibrate with more amplitude which causes more output which blows speakers. i have also heard the the 'overtones' are more complicated with a real bass instead of an octave pedal. i have heard tales of more 'complicated waveforms' bass notes and more 'simple/pure waveforms' of octave pedal/synth bass. but really none of that satisfies me.

there has be something that the claim is based on, but everything i hear for the reasoning has been vague at best and misleading at worst...
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#7
True... you can hear the low notes resonate in a much articulate way on say a piano, or when you are singing, as opposed to when it's just a digital signal that's been lowered.
Fender Jaguar
Morley PVO +
TC Polytune
Fulltone Ultimate Octave
Boss DS2
Blackstar HT-40
Digitech Timebender
TC Trinity

(offboard; Whammy IV, Crybaby 535Q, Digitech RP100A)
#9
Quote by nightraven
what i have heard is that it's to do with the vibrations of the thicker bass guitar strings. take it with a pinch of salt though, but i've never ever heard of an instance where an octave pedal has damaged a speaker.


Vibration = frequency tho.

Really i think people are just bullshitting us into spending more money on bass gear.
#10
exactly becky, it doesn't add up all the way. though i don't agree about the bass gear thing...

this is what i do know:

-when you change the frequency of a source signal, like in a pitch shifter, the output signal seems to be a more simple wave form (devoid of more complex harmonics or partials due to the loss of data in the transform used to get a lower note).

-lower frequency notes played through a loudspeaker causes a speaker's excursion to increase at the same volume

any theory has to account for these phenomenon
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#11
I use my Whammy IV lots, and it never caused damage.
To the amp of course. To my ears, yes. The 2 octaves up is crazy high.
..I was watching my death.
#12
I've recorded bass through my rig before and it worked fine. It's more an issue of volume than pitch. Low frequencies seem to eat up headroom real fast which can lead to your speakers distorting or being damaged, so just don't crank it.