#1
Note that i've looked for several threads and although I learned this and that I didn't find anything that fully satisfied me.

So here's the thing. I've been playing guitar for 1 year (acoustic) and just started on electric (2 months), I play with a Schecter solo-6 custom (duncan designed active pickups), a Laney LX20R and I'm looking to get some information on PEDALS. I just want to know everything there is to it.

What kind of pedals there are, what kind of pedals I might need, multi-effect pedals vs individual pedals. The thing is I'm looking forward to have a better drive tone, a couple more effects available for use and also being able to switch channels without having to do it on the amp. Personally I'd rather have one of those that include multiple effects, like those boss and zoom pedals. Also I've seen that some amps distortion are called drive, others crunch, or even gain. Is there any difference?
#2
That is a very broad and difficult question to tackle. Instead of destroying my brain and typing a page, I found a link for you. This should help you immensly.

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/music_theory/pedals_an_explanation_for_beginner_guitarists.html

Though I don't know how you didn't find that. You must not have looked very hard - I found it within like 2 minutes on google.
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#3
You surely have a point on that, it's just that I only looked on UG forum and the only stuff I found in a 2~3 pages range was people having trouble with their pedals, or just posting a "x vs y" thread. Nevertheless thank you very much
Last edited by RuiGuitar at Sep 6, 2010,
#4
Found some more that should interest you. From https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/announcement.php?s=&forumid=33 :

"Overdrive-
Overdrive is often confused with distortion due to a similar "kind" of sound.. but overdrive re-creates the natural warm sound of a vintage tube amp that is being "overdriven" or is breaking up. when a tube amps volume is pushed beyond its capacity, they "break up" and begin to sound crunchy and distorted, the resulting sound is overdrive.

o styles
- Blues, Blues Rock, Fusion, Classic Rock

Distortion -
Distortion is what makes metal, rock, punk, grunge, etc... sound the way it does. you know what i mean, the crunchy riffs the screeming pinch harmonics and solos , that dirty ass bone crunching sound of death and pain marching across the land AAAARRRGGHHHH!!! that my friend, is distortion. Distortion clips the top and bottom off a signal, effectively making the sine wave, like this . Soft clipping is produced by tube amps overdriving and distortion/overdrive pedals. Hard clipping is caused by overdriving solid state circuits. distortion ranges from mild to ball shattering in intensity and thickness.

o styles
- Punk, Grunge, Heavy Metal, Death Metal and all other forms of metal you can think of

Chorus-
Chorus is a shimmering effect that gives a deep lush sound. It does this by mixing the normal signal with a signal that has been delayed and raised slightly in pitch.

o styles
- most any style or genre you'll eventually hear a chorus pedal, however one notable chorus afficianado was David gilmour of Pink Floyd, he lives on this pedal (and a delay pedal), another example of chorus is the guitar sound heard on Nirvanas ?Come as You Are?

Delay -
Delay does exactly what it says. It repeats exactly what you play a short time after you play it. It could be used to add some depth or to create some really whacked out trippy sounds.

o styles
- everything from metal to punk, grunge to blues, classic rock to reggae ?. You can hear it in almost any genre.

Flanger -
Flangers sound almost like a jet plane soaring over you. It is an effect that is similar to chorus but the pitch is not changed. The signal is just delayed a little bit.

o styles
- lots of early 80?s metal to be specific, Van Halen loved the flanger.

Phaser -
Phasers mix the normal signal with a signal that goes through a modulated delay (or varied delay), modulating the various frequencies of the pitch. With phasers, as well as chorus and flanger, you can vary the amount of modualtion (depth) and the speed of the modulation as well.

o styles
- nu metal seems to rather enjoy this effect, although they tend to throw taste right out the window *cough*Korn*cough*. Another frequent user of a phaser (the phase 90 to be precise) was once again, van halen

Tremelo -
Tremelo is a fluctuation of volume, whether it be a fast and large difference in volume or a slower and lesser change in volume. A tremelo pedal covers all the bases

o styles -
- Surf rock, blues, and once again nu metal rears its ugly head (again, using tremelo to the degree of utter pointlessness??? but I digress)
o Tremelo Myth
- Tremelo is often confused as a fluxuation of a pitch. However, that is what's known as vibrato, a rapid or slight changing of a pitch back and forth, up and down. Not suprising though, as the bar on the guitar that?s used to change pitch back and forth is reffered to as a tremelo bar

Reverb -
Reverb is an effect that simulates the natural reflection of sound waves off of the walls, which makes it sound as if you?re playing in a large auditorium. It is often used to add depth, and comes equipped on many amplifiers.

o styles
- anything and everything

Compression -
Compression is a device that makes every note come out at the same volume. In other words, It softens the notes you play hard, and amplifies the notes you play softly. The effect also adds a lot of sustain to the notes.

o styles
- everything

Octave -
Octave Pedals play the note that you are playing plus a note that is one octave either higher or lower. In some cases 2 octaves.

o styles
- funk, rock, almost anything Tom Morello does

Wah Pedal
ahhhhh the much beloved wah pedal. The Wah pedal alters the tone of your sound. You can rock a Wah pedal back and forth to produce a sound that sounds like "WAH." It is similar to your tone knob in how it works. Try putting your tone knob all the way up, then all the way down and listen to the difference. It is very similar to pressing the Wah pedal all the way down, or all the way up. The tone of something can most easily be described as the fatness or thinness of the sound. To hear what I mean, try the tone knob thing I just described, or go to your amp, plug in, turn the treble all the way down and the bass all the way up and then play ?.. This is a ?fat? tone . now turn your bass all the way down and treble all the way up, that is a ?thin? tone.

o styles
- you name it, rock, blues, funk, fusion, metal, punk, everyone loves the wah.

Pitch shifter -
well, it does just what it says. It takes whatever you play and shifts the pitch of that note up or down. Pitch chifters have interval selections on them in which you can choose the type of interval that the note will be shifted. The most noteable pitch shifter in existence is by far the Whammy pedal.

o styles
- well, mostly rock/metal. 2 big progenitors of pitch shifting popularity are Dimebag Darrell of Pantera (pantera Owns You) and Tom Morello of RATM. Tom is by far the biggest whammy slut on the planet, listen to him to get a good idea of what you can do with the whammy

Harmonizers -
Harmonizer pedals do exactly as they say, they harmonize . The pedal takes a note and harmonizes it with a specific interval that you have dialed in.For example you could set the pedal for Major 3rds in which case, every note that you play, the pedal will play a major 3rd off of that note. So if you play a C the Pedal plays an E. and of course, it plays it at the same time. Whats the difference between this and a pitch shifter you ask? Well the only difference is the shifter changes the C to an E, the harmonizer creates an E to be played over the C that you?re playing. So it sounds like you?re playing 2 notes at the same time.The Whammy Pedal is once again a great example of a harmonizer, it has harmonizing and pitch shifting capabilities.

o important
- The only thing you need to be careful off is playing more then one note at a time, because that?s all harmonizes can handle, if you try playing 2 or more notes, the circuitry gets confused and you get a noisey jumble of mud. But hey, sometimes noise is a great thing
o styles
- 80?s shred, Jason Becker, Steve Vai, and once again almost anything Tom Morello does in his solos, especially off of the first album"
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#6
Another question, you see, some songs hardly leave time to manually switch the pickups directly on the guitar switch and also if I'm watching some cover videos on YT for instance I note that sometimes they're not switching on the switch, which means there must some other way. Is there a foot switch for that or whatever?
#7
amps almost always come with an input for a footswitch. they are usually different for every amp and are usually not universal. they change your amp's channel, toggle between settings, etc etc
#8
To add on what OffWorld is saying...

Multi-effects are more for recording and finding your own sound. Most of these pedals really aren't that great for live playing because they lack the warmth and depth of individual pedals.

Stompboxes are more for when you know what sound you're looking for, and you know how to chain up them up.

A footswitch is for changing channels with your amp, and is probably the most practical way to play guitar through an amp. Most amps with a footswitch slot also have an effects loop where you're supposed to put time based effects like delay, I believe.
#9
What if your amp doesn't have one? Cause I don't find mine to have one input for that, only the regular input to plug the guitar into, a cd/line in input and a input for the phones.
#10
So let's say, for instance, a footswitch like this fficial%26biw%3D1024%26bih%3D589%26tbs%3Disch:1&um=1&itbs=1&iact=hc&vpx=125&vpy=66&dur=6143&hovh=229&hovw=220&tx=113&ty=120&ei=-KiGTM7wK4i6jAfD95WPCA&oei=-KiGTM7wK4i6jAfD95WPCA&esq=1&page=1&ndsp=15&ved=1t:429,r:0,s:0">one allows to change the channel of your guitar? Cause i'ts a pain in the ass when I mess up a song due to having to change pickups on the guitar switch.
#11
Well those footswitches are for changing channels on your amp (assuming your amp has more than one channel)

An example of using a footswitch like that is for going from clean tones to overdriven tones.

The pickup switching you're asking about is a matter of just speeding up when you need to switch. As far as I know there isn't a pedal that switches pickups for you.

Also pedals are very very specialized. Like Distortion Pedal A won't give you the same sound as Distortion Pedal B. You may want a certain tone, and then buy a distortion pedal thinking any one would do. Or even buying the right pedal but not having the right amp.

As Offworld said, it's a very broad topic.
#12
Quote by siverstorm
Also pedals are very very specialized. Like Distortion Pedal A won't give you the same sound as Distortion Pedal B. You may want a certain tone, and then buy a distortion pedal thinking any one would do. Or even buying the right pedal but not having the right amp.

As Offworld said, it's a very broad topic.



Well, that's something I didn't know. However, I've realized that for now I might be rather looking for a multi-effect pedal, because as r0ckth3d34n said individual effect pedals would probably work better if I was looking for something unique, which isn't the case, I'm looking for better distortion a couple of effects to use and try out.

Therefore, having a multi-effect pedal will be, eventually, the best choice bearing in mind it'll allow me to switch the amp's channel and have a couple of more effects available.

Still, how does the multi-effect pedal distortion behaves? Should I be thinking of spending some more and getting a individual distortion pedal for higher quality? (since it's such an essential thing).
Last edited by RuiGuitar at Sep 7, 2010,
#13
The multi-effects will essentially give you two channels for your amp, one is the amp's tone and the other is the tone being processed by the pedal.

Depending how much money you spend on the pedal will greatly depend on how it sounds. If you settle for an RP55 or something similar, you won't be getting great sounds. I wouldn't go cheaper than $200 (looks at signature) for a multi-effects because most lack the flexibility and sound much more digital.

With a multi-effects, you'll get a broad range of different distortion/overdrive settings, and can help you develop the tone you want. Or knowing what something sounds like through a specific amp is another way to develop the sound you want. You'll also get the chance to mess with a variety of other effects and really change the way you make music.