#2
from what I can tell straight off, the fender has brass sadles, better pickups, and is made of alder(methinks) as opposed to ash.

edit:this is wrong the body of the squire is maple, my brain was being dumb.
no sir away a papaya war is on
Last edited by the_perdestrian at Sep 7, 2010,
#3
Quote by the_perdestrian
from what I can tell straight off, the fender has brass sadles, better pickups, and is made of alder(methinks) as opposed to ash.


would u think there's gonna be a real difference sound wise. See what happened is i picked up the bass isn't the first pick for 280 in a store. Its my first bass and i tired searching ebay and stuff for anything cheaper and i couldn't really(couldn't got a affinity squire but they just sucked) Now im looking on ebay and seeing guitars like the second one for 300-400. I can proable sell mine for 200ish, would it be worth it to do that and get the other one?
#4
I believe the Squier is made in Indonesia, but I could be mistaken so don't quote me on that. The body is made of maple, it has a maple fingerboard, a plastic nut, and plastic binding and block inlays. Its also got Duncan Designed pickups

The Fender is made in Mexico, the body is alder, and it has a rosewood fingerboard, with a "synthetic bone" nut (I couldn't tell you if that means tusq or if Fender is giving plastic a fancy name there), and standard Fender pickups.

The quality is similar on both of them, the VM and CV Squier's are regarded as being similar/the same quality as the MIM's, so don't let the country of origin put you off the Squier at first glance.

EDIT: it probably wouldn't be worth the time to sell a Squier VM for a Fender MIM. The Squier's are quite good, if I were you I'd just upgrade the Squier. Maybe throw on a new bridge, new tuning machines, new pickups, etc.
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Last edited by Tostitos at Sep 7, 2010,
#5
Quote by Tostitos
I believe the Squier is made in Indonesia, but I could be mistaken so don't quote me on that. The body is made of maple, it has a maple fingerboard, a plastic nut, and plastic binding and block inlays. Its also got Duncan Designed pickups

The Fender is made in Mexico, the body is alder, and it has a rosewood fingerboard, with a "synthetic bone" nut (I couldn't tell you if that means tusq or if Fender is giving plastic a fancy name there), and standard Fender pickups.

The quality is similar on both of them, the VM and CV Squier's are regarded as being similar/the same quality as the MIM's, so don't let the country of origin put you off the Squier at first glance.

EDIT: it probably wouldn't be worth the time to sell a Squier VM for a Fender MIM. The Squier's are quite good, if I were you I'd just upgrade the Squier. Maybe throw on a new bridge, new tuning machines, new pickups, etc.


thank you for the help.... whats the best upgrade pickups(i know it depends on style of music but whats ur suggestion)
#6
^ It depends on what you want and how much you're willing to spend. I'd suggest taking a look at Dimarzio (Model J's, and Area J's), Seymour Duncan (there's alot, Hot Stacks, Classic Stacks, Lightnin' Rods, Vintage Jazz, Quarter Pounders), and Bartolini (J Bass Pickups).
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#7
Quote by Tostitos
^ It depends on what you want and how much you're willing to spend. I'd suggest taking a look at Dimarzio (Model J's, and Area J's), Seymour Duncan (there's alot, Hot Stacks, Classic Stacks, Lightnin' Rods, Vintage Jazz, Quarter Pounders), and Bartolini (J Bass Pickups).

ok thank you
#8
+1 on the idea to upgrade your current bass.
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#9
Excuse my ignorance, but...

Isn't Fender the big brother/better version of Squier?
pinga
#10
Quote by Cb4rabid
Excuse my ignorance, but...

Isn't Fender the big brother/better version of Squier?


Yes, you're correct.

The thing is, they make Fenders all over the place. Japan, USA, and Mexico, and the Squiers are made in Asian countries (currently Indonesia).

The Squiers are the cheapest, followed by the Mexicans ones which are middle ground, and the Japanese and USA Fenders are the top quality ones.

The difference between the higher end Squiers and the lower end Mexican ones is usually too minimal to justify the price gap, and sometimes not even present at all.

For this reason it's usually better to buy a decent Squier and upgrade some of the hardware (which is really the only thing setting it apart from a MIM Fender) if you're not going for a Japanese or USA model.
#11
I see. I realized that I never even worry about the place where the product is made when I buy something. I didnt even know that was a factor.

Thank you kind sir'.
pinga
#12
Quote by Cb4rabid
I see. I realized that I never even worry about the place where the product is made when I buy something. I didnt even know that was a factor.

Thank you kind sir'.


It's become increasingly negligible over the years.

There's a lot of stuff often referred to as Japcrap from the 70s (though some people like collecting it). Having never played much of that stuff, I can't say much.

However, the Japanese Fenders of today are just as good as (if not better) than the USA ones. So the quality must have improved over time.

I think there's probably too much attention paid to where something is made. I remember reading something somewhere that stuck in my mind. It went something like this;

"You can either get a Fender made by underpaid Mexican labourers in Mexico, or pay twice as much to get a Fender made by underpaid Mexican labourers in the USA."

With the amount of work done by computers and machinery now, not a great deal of difference is made by where something is made, until you're talking about hand-crafted custom gear.

Obviously the USA Fenders are better than the Mexican ones (on paper anyway), and having owned both I much prefer the USA ones, although a lot of that probably has as much to do with hardware and such as it does craftmanship.

I only use Fender as an example, of course. The same likely applies to most guitar manufacturers.
#13
^ Quite well put there

Quote by Ziphoblat
With the amount of work done by computers and machinery now, not a great deal of difference is made by where something is made, until you're talking about hand-crafted custom gear.

I'd like to add though, that the place of manufacture can determine a few factors, namely domestic woods that may be used in the manufacturing process, and the fact that less-than-acceptable bodies and necks can fall through the cracks easier in, say, the Squier factory in Indonesia as opposed to the Corona shop in the US.
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#14
Is it wierd that I LOVEE Fenders but hate Squiers?

and Epiphones....(not a big fan of Gibson either, I HATE those bodies)

Ew.
pinga
#15
Quote by Tostitos
^ Quite well put there


I'd like to add though, that the place of manufacture can determine a few factors, namely domestic woods that may be used in the manufacturing process, and the fact that less-than-acceptable bodies and necks can fall through the cracks easier in, say, the Squier factory in Indonesia as opposed to the Corona shop in the US.


This is definitely another factor; I recall reading an interesting article about the differences between your average basswood and Japanese basswood, and how despite what you might expect of basswood, the Japanese variety is a very nice tone wood.

Quote by Cb4rabid
Is it wierd that I LOVEE Fenders but hate Squiers?

and Epiphones....(not a big fan of Gibson either, I HATE those bodies)

Ew.


I wouldn't say it's too unusual. Personally I learned to play on an affinity Squier, and though it was okay, after playing a Fender in a music shop for the first time, I grew to dislike them.

That was until, a couple of years down the line, I played one of the VM Fretless Squiers. That thing was amazing. The only thing that puts me off (silly as it sounds) is having Squier printed on the headstock. One day when I have some spare change though, I'm definitely going to buy one, even if just for the Jaco look.

In the time I've been playing I've owned an 86 Gibson Explorer (those are rare, but it's no surprise that the line was hastily discontinued) and an 87 (I think) Gibson G3, and I've got to say, neither were to my particular taste. I don't think basses are really something that Gibson have ever particularly excelled at. It's more of a "bit on the side" for them really.

As for Epiphones, I don't really see the point at all in them. The only kind I'd consider buying is one of the semi-acoustic models, but to be honest if I had the money to justify getting a semi-acoustic I'd be much more inclined to pick up an Ibanez.
#16
Quote by Ziphoblat

I wouldn't say it's too unusual. Personally I learned to play on an affinity Squier, and though it was okay, after playing a Fender in a music shop for the first time, I grew to dislike them.

That was until, a couple of years down the line, I played one of the VM Fretless Squiers. That thing was amazing. The only thing that puts me off (silly as it sounds) is having Squier printed on the headstock. One day when I have some spare change though, I'm definitely going to buy one, even if just for the Jaco look.

In the time I've been playing I've owned an 86 Gibson Explorer (those are rare, but it's no surprise that the line was hastily discontinued) and an 87 (I think) Gibson G3, and I've got to say, neither were to my particular taste. I don't think basses are really something that Gibson have ever particularly excelled at. It's more of a "bit on the side" for them really.

As for Epiphones, I don't really see the point at all in them. The only kind I'd consider buying is one of the semi-acoustic models, but to be honest if I had the money to justify getting a semi-acoustic I'd be much more inclined to pick up an Ibanez.

God, so true. Its just that little voice in my head that says "haha Squier, not Fender".

One of the reasons I didnt buy a Warwick rockbass was because of that. I like Ibanez for this reason too, I hate ALL lower end models of anything. It makes me feel ew, even though I know instrument has nothing to do with it. Its an ocd thing I guess

I will buy a Warwick one day though. Mark my words.
pinga
#17
Quote by Ziphoblat
The Squiers are the cheapest, followed by the Mexicans ones which are middle ground, and the Japanese and USA Fenders are the top quality ones.


I thought it went USA - Mexico - Japanese quality wise?
#18
Quote by Mudmen190
I thought it went USA - Mexico - Japanese quality wise?


Nope, the Mexicans are the lowest quality of the Fenders.

The Japanese have export models and non-export models (which are obviously harder to obtain).

The quality in descending order (in my opinion) is;

- USA + Japanese non-export (they're pretty much equal)
- Japanese export (still arguably just as good as a USA model, but slightly cheaper).
- Mexican.

The Japanese Fenders are hugely under-rated when it comes to Fenders. They're great instruments, and they're also a more well-priced alternative to getting a good quality reissue model. The workmanship and quality control on the Japanese models is just as high as it is in the USA, where-as the Mexican one is slightly inferior.

Don't make the mistake of presuming that because they're an Asian country they're cheap slave workers (such as Squier in Indonesia). Japan are probably one of the most developed and wealthiest countries in the world at this point.
#19
^ And it shows, hence why the Japanese-made, top of the line Ibanez's are so good. The Japanese Fenders are just as good as the American ones, the export models (by far the most common) just have cheaper hardware, and some have different body woods.

And MIM's are rather underrated these days, IMO.
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