#1
I am currently writing a song, and there is a particluar section where it is in 10/8. There is a chord strummed once in the bar, how do you write it? right now i have a whole note (8/8) and tied with a quarter note (2/8). The chord rings out through 8 beats and then is quickly strummed again for 2 but i want the chord to ring out for 10? Please help
#2
Quote by BOLX2IT
I am currently writing a song, and there is a particluar section where it is in 10/8. There is a chord strummed once in the bar, how do you write it? right now i have a whole note (8/8) and tied with a quarter note (2/8). The chord rings out through 8 beats and then is quickly strummed again for 2 but i want the chord to ring out for 10? Please help

Here's a general rule of thumb for odd time sigs: you group based on accents. So if, in 10/8, I had a whole note and then a quarter I would do 8 8th notes beamed and then 2 8th notes beamed.

If you're going to take up the whole measure with one rhythm... it's your prerogative.
#3
I'd use a whole note tied to a quarter note as you do currently. Makes the most sense in the context of the song.

May I ask why you chose 10/8 instead of 5/4?
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Sep 7, 2010,
#4
10/8 is not a legitimate time signature. Generally, if the number on the bottom is an 8, then the number on top will be a division of three. For example, 6/8, 9/8, 12/8. This is because they are divided in triplets. So the reason you are having trouble I believe is because the program you are using is using triplets, so you have three sets of triplets then the first note of a triplet set which is awkward. Do yourself a favor and call it 5/4.
#5
Quote by Weaponxclaws
10/8 is not a legitimate time signature. Generally, if the number on the bottom is an 8, then the number on top will be a division of three. For example, 6/8, 9/8, 12/8. This is because they are divided in triplets. So the reason you are having trouble I believe is because the program you are using is using triplets, so you have three sets of triplets then the first note of a triplet set which is awkward. Do yourself a favor and call it 5/4.

Whoa, whoa, whoa.

10/8 is as legitimate as 6/8 and 5/4 are. It's still a time signature, it's just not used as often. Again, with odd-time sigs it's common to divide it by accents, but 3+3+4 is VERY common in 10/8.
#6
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Whoa, whoa, whoa.

10/8 is as legitimate as 6/8 and 5/4 are. It's still a time signature, it's just not used as often. Again, with odd-time sigs it's common to divide it by accents, but 3+3+4 is VERY common in 10/8.
You're right, but if you're dividing it 10+2, then I think 5/4 would be more useful. Unless I'm missing some reason TS chose to use it.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#7
Quote by food1010
You're right, but if you're dividing it 10+2, then I think 5/4 would be more useful. Unless I'm missing some reason TS chose to use it.

Yeah... maybe it just fits better with the backing or something similar. TS... we need your input.
#8
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Yeah... maybe it just fits better with the backing or something similar. TS... we need your input.


This is what is being played over top of the chord, its all 1/8 notes, It seemed to me that it fit in 10/8


- - - - - 2 5 - - - - 6 9 -
- - - -5 - - - - - 9 - - - -
- - 3 - - - - - 7 - - - - -
1 - - - - - - 5 - - - - - -
#9
Quote by BOLX2IT
This is what is being played over top of the chord, its all 1/8 notes, It seemed to me that it fit in 10/8


- - - - - 2 5 - - - - 6 9 -
- - - -5 - - - - - 9 - - - -
- - 3 - - - - - 7 - - - - -
1 - - - - - - 5 - - - - - -


it's probably better if you record a short example so we can give you an answer. this doesn't really do much for us because it doesn't show us where the accent is. hell, these could be quintuplets in 2/4 for all i know.

if i'm inferring the example correctly, 10/8 doesn't really seem appropriate for this kind of thing. but i don't see 5/4 working very well for this (depending on where the accent is placed) unless you're going for some kind of syncopated rhythm.

really, we'd need to hear it.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#10
Quote by AeolianWolf
it's probably better if you record a short example so we can give you an answer. this doesn't really do much for us because it doesn't show us where the accent is. hell, these could be quintuplets in 2/4 for all i know.

if i'm inferring the example correctly, 10/8 doesn't really seem appropriate for this kind of thing. but i don't see 5/4 working very well for this (depending on where the accent is placed) unless you're going for some kind of syncopated rhythm.

really, we'd need to hear it.
I agree, although upon sight I'd have to say 5/8 seems possible/likely.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#12
Yeah, grouping it as one measure of 5/8 for each chord looks smart unless that won't fit the accents you're using.
The guy's a beast, but he uses 8s. So he's shit.
-juckfush on Alex Hutchings.
#13
Quote by DiminishedFifth
This is what I was thinking.


Jumpin on this bandwagon.

I think you are tricking yourself into 10/8
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#14
Quote by AeolianWolf
it's probably better if you record a short example so we can give you an answer. this doesn't really do much for us because it doesn't show us where the accent is. hell, these could be quintuplets in 2/4 for all i know.

if i'm inferring the example correctly, 10/8 doesn't really seem appropriate for this kind of thing. but i don't see 5/4 working very well for this (depending on where the accent is placed) unless you're going for some kind of syncopated rhythm.

really, we'd need to hear it.


The accents are 1 & 6
#15
Quote by BOLX2IT
The accents are 1 & 6
If the accents are both equivalent, then it's definitely 5/8. If the accent on 6 is lesser, you might be able to consider it just a second on-beat.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#16
Quote by food1010
If the accents are both equivalent, then it's definitely 5/8. If the accent on 6 is lesser, you might be able to consider it just a second on-beat.


thanks for the info, i will write it up and post it, hopefully it will give a better idea of the sound i am looking for
#17
Quote by BOLX2IT
thanks for the info, i will write it up and post it, hopefully it will give a better idea of the sound i am looking for

I can almost guarantee that it'll be in 5/8 as opposed to 10/8 (given that the backing agrees with me). If the backing is in 10/8, however, then it's 10/8.