#1
I reckon i need to make a slight change to how I bend notes... let me explain whats happening...

if i bend say the A string for arguments sake, if its a full tone bend then the tip of my finger will push the E string up also, this part is obviously unavoidable... the problem is when I leave the bend at the point where my finger stops making contact with the E string the E rings out slightly...

i generally use 2 or 3 fingers to bend but should one of the supporting fingers be used to rest on the E string to keep it muted maybe?
'93 Gibson Les Paul Special (Heritage Cherry) - modded with SD P90s (Vintage & Hot)
'06 Yamaha RGX520FZ (Translucent Dark Red)
Laney VC15 (Ltd. Edition Old English White)
Jim Dunlop Original Crybaby
Boss DS-1
#2
You can always touch strings that might ring out with your picking hand or a finger on the picking hand.
Quote by Gabel
You are EXTREMELY WRONG! I have played it. I own an 18W and it would be an awful stereo amp, it's way too bright, breaks up too easily and so on. Secondly, why would a guitar store sell an hifi amp.
#3
ahm, it's not as complicated as you'd think, just use your right hand to palm mute the E string.
But i have a little question : why do you bend the A string upwards ? i mean, i always find it easier to "reverse-bend" it. Of course, i can't vibrato while doing that, but it wouldn't be noticeable anyway.
Now, to quote my awesome guitar teacher, there are a lot of ways to stop unwanted strings from ringing. You can use the side of your right thumb, for instance.
#4
Indeed. Muting is done all sorts of ways. It becomes second nature over time. Do what makes sense.
Quote by Gabel
You are EXTREMELY WRONG! I have played it. I own an 18W and it would be an awful stereo amp, it's way too bright, breaks up too easily and so on. Secondly, why would a guitar store sell an hifi amp.
#5
Fair enough, if there isn't a gold standard for this technique I'll just play around and see what works... worth asking though

@hippie_guy - the A string was only an example, its more likely to be the G, B or E...

Cheers chaps
'93 Gibson Les Paul Special (Heritage Cherry) - modded with SD P90s (Vintage & Hot)
'06 Yamaha RGX520FZ (Translucent Dark Red)
Laney VC15 (Ltd. Edition Old English White)
Jim Dunlop Original Crybaby
Boss DS-1
#6
Quote by SooTyLaD
Fair enough, if there isn't a gold standard for this technique I'll just play around and see what works... worth asking though

@hippie_guy - the A string was only an example, its more likely to be the G, B or E...

Cheers chaps

Another point I could raise: If you are bending the b toward the g string, and are having the problem of sounding the g, just roll your fretting hand a bit so it touches the g when the bend is coming back. Do this while palm muting other unwanted strings or touching even more strings with free fingers on your pick hand. You should be able to mute all of the strings except one if you want to. That is done by combining different muting techniques. Muting really is the key to clean non-sloppy playing.
Quote by Gabel
You are EXTREMELY WRONG! I have played it. I own an 18W and it would be an awful stereo amp, it's way too bright, breaks up too easily and so on. Secondly, why would a guitar store sell an hifi amp.
#7
Quote by ripple07
Muting really is the key to clean non-sloppy playing.
Exactly why I'd like to sharpen up on it
'93 Gibson Les Paul Special (Heritage Cherry) - modded with SD P90s (Vintage & Hot)
'06 Yamaha RGX520FZ (Translucent Dark Red)
Laney VC15 (Ltd. Edition Old English White)
Jim Dunlop Original Crybaby
Boss DS-1
#8
you need to pull the string to the floor on the wound strings not push up to the ceiling otherwise you`ll never hit a full tone up without pushing the A string off the fretboard, push up to the ceiling on the unwoud strings, and as said you need to learn to mute unplayed strings
Last edited by ibanezgod1973 at Sep 8, 2010,