#1
Does anyone have any tricks for improvising chords. I have practiced inversions; extensions; and suspended chords for some time now, but have not been able to truely express the sound that I want from them. I was wondering if anyone has any tricks for knowing how a chord might sound before being played. My knowledge of cadances is limited, but I feel that there might be something along those lines that I am not aware of.

Chord progressions are not a problem for me. For the most part I can feel comfortable playing a I-IV-V with a few extra chords thrown in, but when I want to add extensions or inversions things never sound they way that I thought they would have. Any help would be appreciated.

I can try to elaborate on my question if you had trouble reading. I am a bit tired from work at the moment and I'm not sure if I came off right.
Quote by celticstorm84
endless supply of cats = endless supply of food.


Quote by Calibos
I've also noticed that as i've got older, I want to be further and further away from the front at a gig. Damn kids with their mushy pits and walls of doom.
#2
For extensions try using notes that belong to an adjacent chord.
#3
well you could try to learn how they sound just play them and hopefully youll have an idea of how thingsll sound before you play it
#4
I'm not sure I know too much more than you do but my suggestion would be just to learn the triads that would fit in to the key your improving in.
For example. If your in C major. The notes that fit in to that key are C D E F G A B. And you can build a chord triad from each of the those notes while staying in key.
Starting with C. Your triad would be C - E - G. Which is a major triad. So a C major chord would fit in to key. Obvious enough. Here are the triads for every other note.
C. C - E - G. Major Chord.
D. D - F - A. Minor Chord.
E. E - G - B. Minor Chord.
F. F - A - C. Major Chord.
G. G - B - D. Major Chord. (Dominant)
A. A - C - E. Minor Chord.
B. B - D- F. Diminished Chord.

So basically any chords listed above will keep you in Key (For C major). The way you use them is really up to you. But getting in to cadence. the most basic thing of course is using your dominant fifth chord to get you back to your root. I hope I answered your question in some form. But what I posted and what you asked might not exactly allign. Or I may just be saying things you already know.
#5
I know how to keep things in key and I have a good understanding of modes, so forming chords is not an issue. My problem is knowing how a chord will sound and getting it to sound the way I want it to. I know that when playing certain notes I will get a certain melody. EX C-F-G will sound nice, simple, and will flow when played. Now if I was to play C-F- G(6/4)*D in root position*, I can't hear how it affects the music. I can hear the difference, just not what it does.

Basically I am looking for someones opinion on how certain types of chords affect the sound for them personally. I know a lot of it is based off of the chords played before and after as well.

Thinking about it, I might be asking a question that has no answer. I guess it doesn't hurt to ask though.
Quote by celticstorm84
endless supply of cats = endless supply of food.


Quote by Calibos
I've also noticed that as i've got older, I want to be further and further away from the front at a gig. Damn kids with their mushy pits and walls of doom.
#6
Learn inversions and the fragments of the CAGED system...which is tied to inversions.

Also, try chord clusters...or scale clusters. IOW, when play in Key don't be afraid to experiment by clustering some notes from your scale together. You can use regular triad inversions but also try taking some chance and grabbing some notes together in the scale. You'll find that you move around in clusters fairly freely.

If you are sticking to a melody, keep the melody on the high note and grab clusters below it. It works great for directional playing where the clusters move in the same direction as the melody or where the clusters contrast the melody line, or not always move in the same direction as the melody.

Don't forget double stops either, like where you play a note on the high E and G strings together. Just follow your scale notes on each string. This is a very popular thing to do.

There's some great Modal clusters that a lot of people use as a standard to, I have two lessons on them here: http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/MusicTheory/Diatonic/ModChoGriTOC.htm

It's essentially taking your scale and grabbing a form or cluster out of it and then moving each note to the next note in the scale...ala Bill Evans.
#7
Quote by m3tal_R3dn3ck
Does anyone have any tricks for improvising chords. I have practiced inversions; extensions; and suspended chords for some time now, but have not been able to truely express the sound that I want from them. I was wondering if anyone has any tricks for knowing how a chord might sound before being played. My knowledge of cadances is limited, but I feel that there might be something along those lines that I am not aware of.

Chord progressions are not a problem for me. For the most part I can feel comfortable playing a I-IV-V with a few extra chords thrown in, but when I want to add extensions or inversions things never sound they way that I thought they would have. Any help would be appreciated.

I can try to elaborate on my question if you had trouble reading. I am a bit tired from work at the moment and I'm not sure if I came off right.

try maybe just playing two note "chords" at first. play in thirds, fourths, fifths, sixths, etc... get used to that. then try adding another note to it. try to look up eric johnsons style of chord playing. try just moving around different notes in chords. try moving the shapes around acording to the notes in the scale.

if you are using it it improv, try to keep it to a 3-4 note maximum. usually it sounds better that way and leaves more room for you to add alterations or embelishments.
#8
Quote by m3tal_R3dn3ck
My problem is knowing how a chord will sound and getting it to sound the way I want it to.

Thinking about it, I might be asking a question that has no answer. I guess it doesn't hurt to ask though.


the answer to your question is that you need to train your ear more. that's really it. train your ear and learn to apply whatever new information you understand.

simple answer, but ear training can be a lengthy (and sometimes complicated) process. well worth it, though.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#9
A cool technique is to match chords to feelings & emotions. So you can call a maj9 chord "relaxed" or a power chord "determined", diminshed chord "mysterious", add9 "joyful" etc