#1
Okay, I would like to say first, that I do know why sometimes you do have to use a different name for a note. For a basic example, there is no A# in the key of A, but there is a Bb.

But what exactly is the need in enharmonic key signatures? For example, Cb and B are the same note, but there is a Cb Major and B Major key. The only thing that will really change is the letter names of the chords.

Also, I was quite surprised when I found out about the key of G#, that was something new to me.

So, I guess knock some wisdom in me, I'm just curious, I don't mean to be a pain.
#3
Thanks, I probably should have searched first. at myself.

It all makes sense now, though, so thanks again.
#4
Also, Cb would be a total pain in the tits because instead of 5 sharps in B, you have 7 flats in Cb
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#5
Actually there is neither a Bb or an A# in the key of A. But in any case, reasons for writing in B major rather than Cb major for example are primarily that you'd run out of flats in the key signature and it's WAY easier to read the sheet music for.
#6
Quote by grampastumpy
Actually there is neither a Bb or an A# in the key of A. But in any case, reasons for writing in B major rather than Cb major for example are primarily that you'd run out of flats in the key signature and it's WAY easier to read the sheet music for.
If you're playing a tune with a key signature that uses flats and want to modulate to Cb, it's much easier to just use accidentals to add a few flats than to change the key signature (or worse, a bunch of naturals and sharps.) It's all about the context.
The guy's a beast, but he uses 8s. So he's shit.
-juckfush on Alex Hutchings.
#7
Quote by VeilOfMaya
If you're playing a tune with a key signature that uses flats and want to modulate to Cb, it's much easier to just use accidentals to add a few flats than to change the key signature (or worse, a bunch of naturals and sharps.) It's all about the context.
Honestly I thinking nearly all cases simply changing the key signature would be easier, assuming it stays in Cb. If you mean a passage in Gb borrowing the Fb for a bar or two that's a different story.
#8
Quote by grampastumpy
Honestly I thinking nearly all cases simply changing the key signature would be easier, assuming it stays in Cb. If you mean a passage in Gb borrowing the Fb for a bar or two that's a different story.
Yeah, I just meant changing keys to fit over one or two chords. If it was a long section solely in Cb, you're right, it would probably be easier to change the key signature to B natural.
The guy's a beast, but he uses 8s. So he's shit.
-juckfush on Alex Hutchings.
Last edited by VeilOfMaya at Sep 9, 2010,
#9
Quote by VeilOfMaya
If you're playing a tune with a key signature that uses flats and want to modulate to Cb, it's much easier to just use accidentals to add a few flats than to change the key signature (or worse, a bunch of naturals and sharps.) It's all about the context.


If I play on a tune where someone says modulate to a Cb, somebody's getting their ass kicked. No I get it, like a Bb to Cb move, but on guitar....hell naw..

Last edited by Sean0913 at Sep 10, 2010,