MegaDTSX
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#1
This may have been answered here somewhere but the search bar didn't help me much at all:

Does anyone have any tips on how to remove the clicking sound of the pick on guitar recordings? I record through a POD XT Live into a seperate EQ and sustainer/compressor then into either my amp or direct and I also use Cubase 5.
TechnicolorType
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#2
You can try to EQ it differently to lessen the sound. Your only other option is to turn the gain down. You usually won't notice the sound in a mix, but if you have a good ear you can hear it on alot of famous artists recordings.
malmsteensolo
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#3
Whenever I record some stuff I usually put the mic towards the amp. Then I try to move my guitar far away so the mic doesn't pick up the slapping of the strings.
DethbyChocolate
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#4
Quote by malmsteensolo
Whenever I record some stuff I usually put the mic towards the amp. Then I try to move my guitar far away so the mic doesn't pick up the slapping of the strings.

I do this ^ as well, but u can try turning ur amp up a little more so that it drowns out the pick sound
TechnicolorType
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#5
Lol, guys. I don't think he's talking about the sound of him picking or strumming in the back.
He mentioned recording direct and direct recording won't pick up sounds in the room.

I think he's referring to the clicky sound per picked note. If your tone has much gain to it then there will be a slight click every time you pick.
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#7
Quote by TechnicolorType
You can try to EQ it differently to lessen the sound. Your only other option is to turn the gain down. You usually won't notice the sound in a mix, but if you have a good ear you can hear it on alot of famous artists recordings.


You wouldn't want to do that because it will most likely take out the high-end of his guitar as well and then it'll sound muddy.

I've noticed that using a different pick helps, especially if it has a different surface. The thin plastic picks are always noisy.
soundgarden19
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#8
You can try playing with rubber picks, they were made to kill the pick noise.
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#9
what's wrong with a little pick noise? it's not necessarily a bad thing. try listening to the whole mix with it and see if you still think it sounds bad. for acoustic guitars it's often the only thing you hear during a loud part of a song.
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Wise_One
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#10
I have the same problem when I record. Of course this happens only on the high strings. When I export the tracks though, there is no click. Fine by me, don't need to go any deeper.

And yes, I can here the pick clicks in lots of metal albums. Finger noise too.
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Sonny_sam
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#11


Problem solved.
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#13
Quote by Hyjek
You wouldn't want to do that because it will most likely take out the high-end of his guitar as well and then it'll sound muddy.

I've noticed that using a different pick helps, especially if it has a different surface. The thin plastic picks are always noisy.


Uh, no. I'm not talking a 3 band EQ or something.

If you use a like 50 band EQ you can lessen the sound pretty easily without effecting the tone.
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#14
Lol, no. ANY EQ effects the tone. it's better to find a creative solution. That sort of thing usually gets masked in the mix anyway, and even if it doesn't it won't be an issue at all unless it's really prominent and annoying.
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TechnicolorType
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#15
I could easily go and cut a frequency down in a massive band EQ on a simple guitar track and you wouldn't be able to notice.
Test it out sometime. Lmao.
There isn't going to be any other ways to lessen that sound post-recording.
Last edited by TechnicolorType at Sep 14, 2010,
Sonny_sam
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#16
Semi-relevant to this & really cool anyway - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKd3gEQfZWI

If you can filter the exact frequencies the pick clicking is most prominent at, it shouldn't affect your tone in a big way.
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MegaDTSX
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#17
Quote by Sonny_sam


Problem solved.



Instead of just linking a picture of that pick, could you actually link it?
TasianSensation
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#18
Noise gate. That's probably the most effective way. It also will help with unwanted buzzing and general noise. Just set the threshold at a point where you can still hear the notes, but not anything else.
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Sonny_sam
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#19
Quote by MegaDTSX
Instead of just linking a picture of that pick, could you actually link it?


http://www.jimdunlop.com/index.php?page=products/pip&id=3

It's the Dunlop Jazz III (3) - it's a really nice size and shape, and it's thick enough that if you're holding the pick properly it glides off the string nicely, giving a really clean and crisp note with no clicking sound (unless you're using silly amounts of gain and/or high frequencies).
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Kivarenn82
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#20
Quote by Sonny_sam
http://www.jimdunlop.com/index.php?page=products/pip&id=3

It's the Dunlop Jazz III (3) - it's a really nice size and shape, and it's thick enough that if you're holding the pick properly it glides off the string nicely, giving a really clean and crisp note with no clicking sound (unless you're using silly amounts of gain and/or high frequencies).


I wouldn't say the jazz III has a crisp sound at all. more of a soft round attack.

Still a great pick tho. I tend to alternate between these and the 1.00 mm jim dunlop nylon picks.
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Last edited by Kivarenn82 at Sep 28, 2010,
Sonny_sam
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#21
I'd say that the jazz I and II have more of a soft & rounded attack, but I always find the jazz III has a much crisper sound than most standard sized picks.
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moody07747
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#22
1 - Try a different pick
2 - High band count EQs can notch out a small area to get some noise out but it may effect the tone slightly if you go too far.
3 - If this is an electric, play further away from any mics you are using...if acoustic, try a new mic position.
julzius
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#23
the 2nd poster was talking about a notch filter. And that should do the trick. But u have to find the picks frequency and hope that it's not a crucial part of ur guitars sound. And it may effect the guitars sound slightly but at least it won't be a dramatic change.

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#24
Quote by soundgarden19
You can try playing with rubber picks, they were made to kill the pick noise.

what's wrong with a little pick noise? it's not necessarily a bad thing. try listening to the whole mix with it and see if you still think it sounds bad. for acoustic guitars it's often the only thing you hear during a loud part of a song.
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#25
Quote by TechnicolorType
I could easily go and cut a frequency down in a massive band EQ on a simple guitar track and you wouldn't be able to notice.
Test it out sometime. Lmao.
There isn't going to be any other ways to lessen that sound post-recording.

You're right that it can be done barely noticeably, but your last statement is wrong.

A simple de-esser could solve this problem, and depending on the material you could also use an enveloper or transient shaping plug-in to lower the immediate attack (i.e the pickstroke) in the waveforms.
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Ishiga
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#26
Quote by Sonny_sam
God's preferred pick blown up ridiculously large[/image[]

Problem solved.


Great picks, only picks I've used for the past three years hands down. But.

For those of us guitarists like me who are infected with the ineedfacemeltinggain parasite, we can't turn down the gain and even with jazz III's, we still get that quarter-second of distorted plastic-on-metal scratch right before every note we hit. My best advice, thread starter, roll down your volume knob on your guitar a little bit. That will do WONDERS as far as cleaning your sound up. Most pro-recorded/produced music out there with hi-gain guitars, if you pay real close attention, you can still hear the string-scratch, it's just covered up by them rolling their volume down a little bit (eliminates some of the fuzz and excess hum while keeping it high-gain at the cost of a little less sustain) as well as being covered up by drums, bass, vocals, whatever. Other stuff kinda drowns it out. In most high-gain metal bands the guitars are scooped, meaning the bass and treble are cranked with virtually zero mids, making them kind of hard to distinguish. That's to cover up the pick-scratch.

Bottom line: Turn your volume knob down a little, between 6 and 8.5, and throw in some drums. Use lots of symbols.

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Mean.

LOTS.

EDIT:::::: Eric Johnson Dunlop Jazz III Jesus Christ Superstar Omega Play Some ****ing Music Picks
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Clay-man
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#27
Quote by Dunjma
what's wrong with a little pick noise? it's not necessarily a bad thing. try listening to the whole mix with it and see if you still think it sounds bad. for acoustic guitars it's often the only thing you hear during a loud part of a song.


well it's annoying when it's too loud. Hearing CLOC CLOC CLOC sound every time you pick the string.

It's called pick attack. I usually experience it with a booster.
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DisarmGoliath
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#28
Quote by Ishiga
Great picks, only picks I've used for the past three years hands down. But.

For those of us guitarists like me who are infected with the ineedfacemeltinggain parasite, we can't turn down the gain and even with jazz III's, we still get that quarter-second of distorted plastic-on-metal scratch right before every note we hit. My best advice, thread starter, roll down your volume knob on your guitar a little bit. That will do WONDERS as far as cleaning your sound up. Most pro-recorded/produced music out there with hi-gain guitars, if you pay real close attention, you can still hear the string-scratch, it's just covered up by them rolling their volume down a little bit (eliminates some of the fuzz and excess hum while keeping it high-gain at the cost of a little less sustain) as well as being covered up by drums, bass, vocals, whatever. Other stuff kinda drowns it out. In most high-gain metal bands the guitars are scooped, meaning the bass and treble are cranked with virtually zero mids, making them kind of hard to distinguish. That's to cover up the pick-scratch.

Bottom line: Turn your volume knob down a little, between 6 and 8.5, and throw in some drums. Use lots of symbols.

I.

Mean.

LOTS.

EDIT:::::: Eric Johnson Dunlop Jazz III Jesus Christ Superstar Omega Play Some ****ing Music Picks

I'm sorry if this comes across as rude, I don't mean it maliciously, but most of what you said there is completely untrue... if someone told you all that, they were misleading you!

Firstly, heavily scooped mids exist almost solely in the bedrooms of guitarists yet to 'find their ears' and on stage with bands who also are unable to judge how they sound. As a sound engineer, I'll tell you now that scooped mids will not be heard live, and will make the guitars sound like an angry wasp on cd. If anything, guitars in metal have more midrange than a lot of music, as the very low end is filtered out to make room for the bass and the kick drum, the lower midrange becomes the harmonic definition of the bass notes, and the high end is for cymbals and 'air'.

Secondly, rolling back the volume on your guitar will just reduce your gain again, albeit earlier in the signal chain - you just increase the capacitance (and yes, lose a lot of sustain), which is surely not what you want unless you want a jazzy clean tone!

Also, most metal (even extreme death metal) that is well-recorded uses a lot less gain than you'd think - the ability of the players usually masks this, as they play technical parts with the gain rarely past 75-80% at the preamp stage in extreme stages. Pushing the power amp tubes increases the distortion too, while affecting the gain and tone more favourably, and don't forget that a well set-up guitar with high-outpu pickups will allow the player to pull off fancier riffs and licks with less gain.
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MegaDTSX
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#30
I figured out that cutting out some higher frequency really helped. I'm not using much gain. Live I use about 80%-85% gain, but during the recording I kind of hover around 65-75% since I double track and pan hard left/right (really seems to magnify that distortion when done this way).

So I applied some tweaks to the EQ and got some good sounds out. Thanks for the tips in this thread though because I didn't know about the Jazz III picks and OMG THEY'RE AWESOME. Seriously, these picks are great and really do help with pick attack.
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#31
Quote by MegaDTSX
I figured out that cutting out some higher frequency really helped. I'm not using much gain. Live I use about 80%-85% gain, but during the recording I kind of hover around 65-75% since I double track and pan hard left/right (really seems to magnify that distortion when done this way).

So I applied some tweaks to the EQ and got some good sounds out. Thanks for the tips in this thread though because I didn't know about the Jazz III picks and OMG THEY'RE AWESOME. Seriously, these picks are great and really do help with pick attack.


a) Set up a "booth" for your guitar to avoid sounds from outside (ie Picking sound), you can achieve that by just creating something like a "tent" surrounding the amp (you can use a blanket), this will absorb some of the reflections and it will cutoff the incoming and unwanted sounds outside of it.

b) You can use a cardioid dynamic microphone, set it up on-axis and move the amp away from the direction of the microphone (Dynamic mics are never omni-directional,so they'll only pick up what's in front of them)

c) Use both of the above.

TIP : Don't cutoff high frequencies from the guitars, they'll blend with the rest of the mix creating a phase.. instead use an LFO
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Last edited by Necrolust at Oct 4, 2010,
Daneeka
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#32
Quote by Necrolust
a) Set up a "booth" for your guitar to avoid sounds from outside (ie Picking sound), you can achieve that by just creating something like a "tent" surrounding the amp (you can use a blanket), this will absorb some of the reflections and it will cutoff the incoming and unwanted sounds outside of it.

b) You can use a cardioid dynamic microphone, set it up on-axis and move the amp away from the direction of the microphone (Dynamic mics are never omni-directional,so they'll only pick up what's in front of them)

c) Use both of the above.


he is recording direct, there are no mics involved, he talks abou an other thing.

Quote by Necrolust

TIP : Don't cutoff high frequencies from the guitars, they'll blend with the rest of the mix creating a phase.. instead use an LFO


a what? an oscillator? why?
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Necrolust
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#33
Quote by Daneeka
a what? an oscillator? why?


My bad...Acronym mistake
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