#1
Hey everyone,

I'd like to get some thoughts on different ways to go about stringing a classical guitar. I have a method that kinda works for me right now, but my high e has a tendency to slip a few times before I can get it to tune up. I've tried a few different creative ways to tie the string down at the bridge, but I'd like some more ideas. What do you think?
#4
They certainly take more effort and require more tuning the first couple of days after restringing than a steel string guitar.

Personally I go with the twist method described in neb9's link. Never failed me yet and I haven't noticed any "slipping" either. Not that it should be a problem, just crank that thang as much as is necessary.
#5
Quote by neb9
You have to tune a classical guitar all the time. That's just the nature of nylon strings.

I do know that. You see, I'm a classical music composition major, with an emphasis in guitar. I have been playing classical guitar for years now, but due to the fact that I taught myself, I've always just dealt with the slipping I described in my first post. Never really occurred to me that there might be a better way, because nobody had ever told me before. When I got to college, I finally took my first private lesson, at which point my teacher pointed out how a guitar as nice as mine should not have that much slippage occurring (my classical guitar cost around $1,200, so, yeah... he's right).

I'll take a look at that link you sent me. The reason for posting is that fact that my strings (all of them, not just the basses) are due for a change soon, so here's to a more productive restringing session!

Oh, and for anyone wondering how I managed to get into college having just taught myself how to play: I was pretty damn shocked too. I basically spent half a year digging into a Bach piece for my audition (Gigue from Lute Suite II), and that was apparently enough. Of course, once I took my first lesson, there were several technical things my teacher had to correct.
#6
Quote by XianXiuHong
If you have a poorly strung or constructed guitar, then yes.

We'll just have to disagree on this point.
#7
Quote by neb9
We'll just have to disagree on this point.

I have to agree with neb9 here. Nylon strings do tend to need quite a bit more tuning than steel strings in the beginning. Of course, the quality of the strings makes a big difference too, but it seems like all my acquaintances go through a stage of complaining about their guitars going out of tune every time they restring. It's just part of life for a classical guitarist.
#8
Quote by stwstl5926
I have to agree with neb9 here. Nylon strings do tend to need quite a bit more tuning than steel strings in the beginning. Of course, the quality of the strings makes a big difference too, but it seems like all my acquaintances go through a stage of complaining about their guitars going out of tune every time they restring. It's just part of life for a classical guitarist.


Well, I agree with having to tune back up heaps in the beginning but once you're past that first 2 days or so, you should be fine with tuning. I thought neb9 was speaking about nylon strings constantly needing tuning even after a couple days after re stringing. No hard feelings, yeah?
#9
Quote by XianXiuHong
Well, I agree with having to tune back up heaps in the beginning but once you're past that first 2 days or so, you should be fine with tuning. I thought neb9 was speaking about nylon strings constantly needing tuning even after a couple days after re stringing. No hard feelings, yeah?

Now that much is true. Mine sometimes holds its tuning after a day if I'm lucky (or if I just play the hell out of it the first day). So yes, your thoughts are correct then.