#1
Hello everyone.

Ive been writting some music but my music theory knowledge is very limited, so I pretty much just go with what sounds good to me, however, sometimes I get very doubtful about what notes to use. Most of the time this happens while writting low pitched bass, I have trouble being confident Im choosing the right notes to "wrap" the higher notes the way I want to.

I was wondering if there are any simple tips to know what notes are "correct" with what notes and what notes just dont go together, as Im not interested in using dissonance in my writting (at least for now).

Peace
Last edited by frusciante.ve at Sep 9, 2010,
#2
I'd suggest learning the major scale (and alternatively, the major pentatonic scale).

If you stick to the major scale, you should be pretty safe in most situations. Of course, it might get stale pretty quick if you don't mix it up much, but it's definitely safe.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#3
They are usually just one fret away from the bad ones.

Food is right though. It's best to learn how to "fit in" and then develop your quirks and stuff. Learn and rip the major scale.
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Don't tell me what can be done, either.



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#5
Quote by frusciante.ve
Hello everyone.

Ive been writting some music but my music theory knowledge is very limited, so I pretty much just go with what sounds good to me, however, sometimes I get very doubtful about what notes to use. Most of the time this happens while writting low pitched bass, I have trouble being confident Im choosing the right notes to "wrap" the higher notes the way I want to.

I was wondering if there are any simple tips to know what notes are "correct" with what notes and what notes just dont go together, as Im not interested in using dissonance in my writting (at least for now).

Peace


Simple tips, not really.

Music theory helps you understand the number of options that you have available that will work, but when you want to go utside" that you'll at least know the difference.

At a minimum I suggest learning how to spell out any major keys and scales, and triad theory and harmony.

Best,

Sean
#6
Quote by frusciante.ve
What you mean with major scale?, the major scale of every note?
Well if you learn about intervals, you can construct a major scale on any note easily.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#7
In terms of "choosing the right notes", every song has a key, and every key has an associated scale. Therefore if you can find the key, you'll be able to find what scale has the "right notes" for that song.

Follow the advice given by the other guys above - it's all good.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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