#2
the speaker is moving air at C the air is moving the string at C which goes into the amp and comes out the speaker to move the string it happens to me all the time
i didnt think it was speacial
Last edited by supersac at Sep 10, 2010,
#3
Quote by supersac
the speaker is moving air at C the air is moving the string at C which goes into the amp and comes out the speaker to move the string it happens to me all the time
i didnt think it was speacial


how does it not feed back though?
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#5
I'm going to take a guess and say "resonant frequency". So every object/material is more susceptable to vibrating (or even exploding) if a particular frequency is played at it. This frequency is unique to each object (think about the opera singer singing at a glass until it shatters, or the theory behind the "brown note").

I think what's happening is that the resonant frequency of that string is being created by that string, and the amplification of the sound is making it vibrate again, which makes the frequency again etc forever.

I'm no physics dude though. All theories are welcome.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#6
Thanks for the responses.

I honestly have no clue. I thought it was the vibration of the note from the amp resonating in the wood of the guitar (which is still amazing because you need a high sustaining wood) but I moved it so it wasn't touching the amp and it was still going. The sad part is I took Physics of Acoustical sound and Music in college and still have no idea...
#8
Quote by vigenharutyunya
hey alan tell more about brown note


Well it's a great party trick, but practicing it at home is not really worth the fun.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#9
Uli Roth has some of that infinite sustain.

Roth preferred amplifier is currently the Framus Dragon, and he uses a stalk mounted Vibesware guitar resonator (sustainer) to introduce infinite sustain during solos[5] both live, and on the song "Benediction" from "Under a Dark Sky".


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulrich_Roth
#10
I don't have a sustainer though. I did some research and found that it was ringing out a harmonic (the C an octave above the one sounded) which was "feeding" the low C. I think that means the harmonic was just keeping the low one sustaining which led to the harmonic and the cycle kept going..
#11
I think it's a combination of "feedback" and resonant frequency. I have no idea how it could work, but it's just an opinion. That's weird though.

Nice poster too.
#12
Quote by AlanHB
I'm going to take a guess and say "resonant frequency". So every object/material is more susceptable to vibrating (or even exploding) if a particular frequency is played at it. This frequency is unique to each object (think about the opera singer singing at a glass until it shatters, or the theory behind the "brown note").

I think what's happening is that the resonant frequency of that string is being created by that string, and the amplification of the sound is making it vibrate again, which makes the frequency again etc forever.

I'm no physics dude though. All theories are welcome.

+1

To see the power of what you just described, check this out. (Skip to 1:00)
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


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