#1
Friend wants to start playing guitar (or atleast try). I intend on teaching her and will most likely borrow her my acoustic since I barely play it anymore. However problem is the strings. It's not the standard gauge on which I started playing, it's thicker then standard (sorry, I don't know the precise size). Anyway this will obviously make playing it harder, and was wondering if starting playing on thick strings will benefit her in the future? Or should I just change the strings to a standard? Well Obviously I know it will benefit her more or less, but just wondering if it's worth it?


Opinions?
#2
Well it'll be harder in the beginning, but I think it'll be worth it considering her bigger finger strength by the time she can properly play it. You might want to slap some thinner strings on though, thick strings might put her off if she is "just trying".
#3
Put some lighter strings on it, starting out on the guitar is hard enough as it is, there's no point making it even harder.
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#5
yeah, thick strings will make it much harder to learn at first, meaning she'd be more likely to give up. I personally have one acoustic with heavy strings, and a second with a light guage. I'll play the heavy one mainly when teaching, letting them use the easiest, but when they start to get good enough I'll swap them around, same with certain exercises.

Try to play with her as she learns, so she has an example of what it should sound like, but whatever you do DON'T show off, its very patronising.
#6
Yeah, I found thicker gauges for when I just started out made playing electric alot easier. The only problem is that she might find it so hard and uncomfortable to play that she decides give up. I'd say an average acoustic string gauge is thick enough.
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#7
Quote by l3vity
yeah, thick strings will make it much harder to learn at first, meaning she'd be more likely to give up. I personally have one acoustic with heavy strings, and a second with a light guage. I'll play the heavy one mainly when teaching, letting them use the easiest, but when they start to get good enough I'll swap them around, same with certain exercises.

Try to play with her as she learns, so she has an example of what it should sound like, but whatever you do DON'T show off, its very patronising.


Oh I know that. When I used to take lessons, my teacher was a real show off (tho still a good teacher). He'd be teaching something simple and then from that simple he'd go into a blazing guitar wanking solo. Tho to me it actually motivated me more, I saw that the others in the group weren't so happy about it. I also have a pretty solid idea of how I'm gonna teach her.
Last edited by Shinami at Sep 10, 2010,
#8
Quote by l3vity
Try to play with her as she learns, so she has an example of what it should sound like, but whatever you do DON'T show off, its very patronising.

I don't know. For me things like that have always been motivating. Seeing someone that's amazing inspires me to do better and work harder. When the person is lowering himself/herself or trying to spare feelings I find it very off-putting.
#9
This is of no help...but you would be LENDING the guitar not borrowing it....apologies, I am a grammar snob!

But yeah, lighter strings are better for beginners. Good Luck teaching!
#10
Also I'm in no position to show off that much, only 1.5 years of playing and I haven't touched my acoustic properly for a long time to be able to show her something impressive on it. Basically I'm gonna take my teachers plan of teaching, and tweak it a bit since having been thought under him I saw some flaws (major flaws at that, but I knew they were flaws so I did some stuff my way)

So this should be a cool experience for me as well if she doesn't change her mind, since I'll be able to remember the old songs that I used to play on my acoustic (Tears In Heaven, some 12 bars bluesy stuff and whatnot)
Last edited by Shinami at Sep 10, 2010,
#11
My one piece of advise is dont push her. My first music teacher pushed and pushed and expected me to pick things up automatically, that just put me off completely! Help her feel the music not just play it. And if she cant do something straight away, however easy it mey be, dont keep saying 'its easy', because it may be for you but not for her!

Good Luck!
#13
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#15
I think the reason I hated guitar was that I had thick gauge strings on my guitar. I ended up quitting and a couple years later I got lighter strings and have been playing ever since.
#16
I think it depends on how dedicated she is to playing long term. I started heavy gauge and it is a benefit that cannot be overstated.

How about this? She can practice with what you have and the string gauge (unless you really want to go through the trouble of changing the strings which is not a bad idea) and now and then... let her try it on electric. She will see an immediate difference and know that one day it will get easier, and see how it will get easier, so that will motivate her plenty, but keep her using the heavy gauge acoustic which is better in the long run.
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#17
I started with a nylon string guitar (classical?!), that helped me ALOT. Obviously I never actually learnt classical stuff, it was more learning the shapes and the basic chords. But i used to altenate between playing my (icky) guitar and my teachers. That helped me.
#18
one of the kids i used to hang out with started playing acoustic with really thick strings, and would get the heaviest guage everytime he would re-string it. later on we started to jam together in a guitar trio, and when we moved to all playing elecric, he would bend every freted note. he would push down as hard as it was necesarry to fret his guitar and it would cause him to bend the notes rather than play them normally. it took him eight months to break that habbit. I guess this is a really long way of saying that you should change those strings...