#1
Hi Everyone.

I just signed up with UG. I hear a lot of people can help me out here, so i decided to check it out.

Im a beginner.

I need someone to point me in the right direction.

What do you need to learn in the first stage.

so far i've gotten:

1)Chords and I've gotten down the: D,G,C,E,A and the minors down..My changes aren't that fast...So im working on the changes. I aslo got the F barre chord.but it's not perfect...if you have a great excersise i can use to speed up my changes..plz let me know.

and

2) Pentatonic Scale...(minor)

Now I would to ask you guys to give me a list of stuff to learn for the first stage in learning to play the guitar.

Thank you everyone
#2
well you could learn some songs you like thatll help you improve your skills and even help with learning new chords
also learn the major scale its kinda important in music
#3
I would say just listen to and play your favourite songs.. I remember practising chords and scales to be a real drag and I didn't find it fun at all, in fact it probably made me want to stop playing the guitar. Learn how to play by actually playing music is the best advice I can give
#4
Honestly what helped me when I was learning chords and their changes I was just looking on UG for five star tabs with chords and I would go to jguitar.com when I didn't know the chord. Not only did that help me learn how to change faster but it helped me learn a ton of new chords.

Just use the advanced search and look for tabs with chords only and learn those for awhile until you're ready to move on and learn some more difficult stuff.

Best of luck, don't give up!
#5
find a fairly simple song by your favourite musicians and learn that, then start doing more difficult songs and you will start to get more and more techniques under your belt. i did this and learnt seek and destroy by metallica first and can now play a selection of more difficult songs.
Hope I helped
#6
Just start learning some easy songs, but here's the catch: don't get caught up too much with playing easy stuff, you have to know when to challange yourself, and you should challange yourself often. If you look at a song/progression/riff/whatever, and you think "that sounds cool, but I can't play that", it's an indicator that you should start learning it. Maybe just bits of it, but that's how you progress.
#7
Quote by edi7

Now I would to ask you guys to give me a list of stuff to learn for the first stage in learning to play the guitar.
why you are taking up guitar, what are your goals, and what genres/styles of music are you interested in?
Also are you aiming to be mainly a lead/solo specialist player... or more the singer/songwriter type? Both? Knowing more about you can allow people to give more specific advice.
#8
I really want to be a lead..I've always wanted to do that. But i know in order for me to do that.I have to go from step 1.

I like Metallica, Maiden, RHCP, Alice in Chains...and the list goes on and on..hahaha

so what's your advice?
#9
Quote by edi7
I really want to be a lead..I've always wanted to do that. But i know in order for me to do that.I have to go from step 1.

I like Metallica, Maiden, RHCP, Alice in Chains...and the list goes on and on..hahaha

so what's your advice?

Pretty much all of Maiden's and Metallica's songs are easy to play, so just pick one you like and start learning it.
#10
Ya but they're fast songs...idk how i can just jump into that..if i don't know techniques. right?
#11
Quote by edi7
I really want to be a lead..I've always wanted to do that. But i know in order for me to do that.I have to go from step 1.

I like Metallica, Maiden, RHCP, Alice in Chains...and the list goes on and on..hahaha

so what's your advice?

My advice is not necessarily fun... but anyway:

You'll want to begin strengthening your fret hand a lot. You might as well start now. This will lead directly to better dexterity, finger independence and quickness needed to play the way you want to down the road. (also make barred chords a breeze) The stronger and more agile you get, the better.

Trill exercises are great. (again not fun) but they work. Any other kind of legato or hammer/pull exercises are also good. And finger independence exercises too. (there are exercises all over the place, just google it or get a decent book)

2 - you'll need to develop solid picking technique to play fast lead. I would begin with alternate picking and stick with that only until further notice. This involves both developing a good pick hand technique, and coordination of both hands together. Start out very slowly. Again there's a billion discussions and tips right on this forum as how to develop your alt picking.

(Be prepared to have a lot of patience and dedication to the above 2 items, but it's well worth the effort especially to a pure beginner. You'll advance fast if you have the right work ethic)

3 - Beyond that for now... just go have some fun learn the songs you like using tabs or whatever.

That should keep things balanced between having fun and putting in some tedious but necessary work to get you going in the right direction
#12
Thanks for the info..i'll get right on it..

question...what exercises do you suggest for chord changes?
#13
Quote by edi7
Thanks for the info..i'll get right on it..

question...what exercises do you suggest for chord changes?

Learn how to play Metallica's Fade to Black - it uses the 4 really common chords (Am, C, G, Em) and it'll teach you how to change between them relatively quickly.
Plus the solos are quite easy so you might want to learn the whole song.

Another good song for chord changes is Maiden's Children of the Damned. Just learn how to play the intro and play it over and over again, it sounds good and it's good practice.
#14
Quote by piszczel
Pretty much all of Maiden's and Metallica's songs are easy to play, so just pick one you like and start learning it.


This isn't true at all.

Fast alternate and down picking plus galloping are all techniques that require lots of practice and timing.


Alice in Chains has a few easy songs though, if I remember correctly, "Would" isn't too hard.
#15
1) To really simplify it, all you have to do is play. Your hands will get used to the chords and naturally get faster.

(also, keep practicing the F bar chord. That shape can be used anywhere)

2) Minor Pentatonic... Do you know it? It's one of the most used scales out there. Make sure you learn the Major scale. All theory is built upon the it and its a good place to start.
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#16
Quote by edi7
Ya but they're fast songs...idk how i can just jump into that..if i don't know techniques. right?


Regardless of the song, when you're a beginner you won't be able to keep up to the chord changes AND trying to strum through it. I would suggest to just start simple by strumming the chord once at every change, when you get comfortable then add more strumming. If you try to keep up you'll only frustrate yourself, give it time, have patience and it will come. You also have the option to pick a slower song or slow it down through Windows Media Player or Quicktime. Lastly, make sure you use a metronome for all your excercises even for chord changes.
#17
I didn't know you can slow a song down with Windows Media player.... ...How?
#18
Quote by edi7
I didn't know you can slow a song down with Windows Media player.... ...How?


I would very so recommend you get the program "Guitar Pro".
It might seem a bit complicated at first but it's the only thing that I learn with and it probably will be the only thing that I ever do.

You can do virtually anything with it, slow down songs, practice your favourite parts over and over, change tuning/key of the song, have your song presented to you in either note or tab form, etc.
#19
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
I would very so recommend you get the program "Guitar Pro".
It might seem a bit complicated at first but it's the only thing that I learn with and it probably will be the only thing that I ever do.

You can do virtually anything with it, slow down songs, practice your favourite parts over and over, change tuning/key of the song, have your song presented to you in either note or tab form, etc.

Get Tux Guitar. It works exactly as well, and opens both guitar pro and power tab files.

Also, it's free

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YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO THEM
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#20
Quote by edi7
Thanks for the info..i'll get right on it..

question...what exercises do you suggest for chord changes?


Here's what I did at the start to clean up my chord changes. Practice going to and from all your chords. A to B, A to C, A to D,... And so on, then start again with B (B to A, B to C, B to D). Use a metronome if you can. Just practice all the changes. I think it helps with muscel memory. Helped me anyway. I still do this when I'm working with unformiliar chords.
#21
A trick I always teach people learning acoustic on chord changes that a lot of people do without even realizing is, on faster songs, take your hands off the fret board to switch and play that quick bit open.

Say you're playing at around 120bps on 8th notes, you could play E at 1 te 2 te 3 te and 4, then on the te of four play open, and on the 1 of the next measure switch to A. It's an odd concept to read, but basically: if it's too fast to switch, strum open to switch between them while maintaining a good sound and rhythm.

A good, easy song to practice this on would be Polly by Nirvana. It's also a great song when learning to sing and play.
#22
Quote by edi7
I didn't know you can slow a song down with Windows Media player.... ...How?


Double click the MP3 you want to play so you get the small Windows Media player pop up, not the library. Right click on the window then Enhancements and you'll find "Play Speed Settings". Click that and you'll get another window with a slider to adjust speed. Pitch is not affected.