#1
Hey, I'm pretty sure everyone has heard the story about lots of highschool bands that grow apart once school is over. Unfortunately, it seems I'm the only guy in the band who seriously wants to be a musician for the rest of his life.

The band has had a few dropouts that were to be expected, but the core of the group (including myself) has been together for a little more than a year.

It's the beginning of the end of highschool and I have no idea about what's going to happen once it's over.

If the band doesn't work out, I've thought of either becoming a session guitarist or a producer/engineer. In complete sincerity, money doesn't mean much at all to me.

I've thought of convincing the others to give the band a shot, but I'd feel really terrible about getting in the way of their "plans".

So what do I do? I love this band to death but none of them have the same commitment to it as myself. Do I get in the way of what could be successful futures? What do I do with the 10 months we have left?

Thanks for reading this...
#3
If you want to become a session guitarist/sound engineer/producer you should go to a college with a good music program. I went to MTSU and they have one the biggest recording industry colleges in the country. Plus, if you are still in a band and go to a college like this, you can use their studios for free.
#4
Well if you can't be in band, try do something in and around the music industry. That's what I'm doing. I couldn't exactly afford MTSU and some of the other colleges with good music programs, but as I looked around I found that my local Comm. College has a audio engineering certificate program. 2 years and getting a full crash course in Pro tools, developing mics and amplifiers, live sound application, business classes, then a placed internship into a local studio or venue. I'm really looking forward to it, start that in March. Look around for something similar in your area.
#6
yea, there is such an opportunity in the music industry. all you have to do is work at it. this is probably something everyone is tired of hearing, but it really is all about your connections. my band used to use a practice room at a music institute that provides music lessons, and then a few years later when i decided to make music my life, i went back to him and i now have a job teaching guitar and i'm the resident sound engineer.

where ever music is in your area, be there all the time and talk to the people. make contacts. get a business card. make sure that people know who you are.
Who decided that pie would be sold on Tuesday but not Wednesday?
#7
Don't worry mate - 10 months is plenty of time for a band to break up naturally.

If you want to keep on playing, you don't need your best buddies by your side - you just play music. I don't see what's stopping you.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#8
Pretty much what Alan said.
Who decided that pie would be sold on Tuesday but not Wednesday?
#9
I'm in the same boat, my band just parted ways because of people going to college and such. I've decided to study to become an audio engineer and continue playing in bands on the side, it took time but once I figured out how much I loved working on the technical side of things, playing shows all over the country didn't matter to me as much anymore. So I guess my advice is to be open to new opportunities, you never know what you might discover about yourself.
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#10
Thank you so much for the advice, you guys. This really means a lot to me, and I'm taking every note to heart.