#1
yes i am still a newbie and still learning crap... so my question to you is.... and please put this in the dumbest form that you can think of... I wanna learn some soad...like aerials and chop suey but they say there tuning for the bass is in drop c... cgcf.... or something like that.... wth? I have an obviously crappy tuner.... so how would i tune this at a drop c? the tuner is a seiko... with input and output
http://www.youtube.com/user/ladiesbass

Bass: Yamaha RBX374 (4 String)
Bass: Schecter Damien-5 (5 String)
Amp: Fender Rumble 60
Future Stack: Ampeg SVT-7PRO Head, SVT-410HLF Bass Speaker Cabinet
#2
Can you tune to Drop D? If you can do that, you can then tune everything relative to drop d...then tune the d to a c and you will have your Drop C tuning...sorry thats about as simple as I can get it...
There is no greater joy than soaring high on the wings of your dreams, except maybe the joy of watching a dreamer who has nowhere to land but in the ocean of reality.

I'm back!
#4
Quote by LadiesBass
yeah, i am at dadg right now...

now tune every thing down a step or two notes down
#5
I sent a message to your inbox...
There is no greater joy than soaring high on the wings of your dreams, except maybe the joy of watching a dreamer who has nowhere to land but in the ocean of reality.

I'm back!
Last edited by Andian03 at Sep 11, 2010,
#6
Nitpick: I think those SOAD songs you mentioned are actually in Drop C#, but I may be wrong.
#7
If you're in DADG right now. Tune your A string to the fifth fret of your E (now D) string, Your higher D to the fifth fret of your A string, then your G string to the fifth fret of your D string. Then Fret the 7th fret of your E (now D) string and lower it until it's the same note as the A (now G) string.
Hope that wasn't too hard to follow
Basses:
Fender Precision Bass
Fender Jazz Bass
1967 Fender Coronado Bass II
Warwick Star Bass
Squier Precision Bass TB
#8
Quote by gquady09
Nitpick: I think those SOAD songs you mentioned are actually in Drop C#, but I may be wrong.


didn't i just say that?!
http://www.youtube.com/user/ladiesbass

Bass: Yamaha RBX374 (4 String)
Bass: Schecter Damien-5 (5 String)
Amp: Fender Rumble 60
Future Stack: Ampeg SVT-7PRO Head, SVT-410HLF Bass Speaker Cabinet
#9
Quote by LadiesBass
didn't i just say that?!

No, you said Drop C, not Drop C#. The # means the note is sharp, a semi-tone, or one fret, higher than the natural note.

EDIT: I think the earlier SOAD stuff is in plain old Drop C, they didn't use Drop C# untill Hypnotise and Mesmerise... I think!
Basses:
Fender Precision Bass
Fender Jazz Bass
1967 Fender Coronado Bass II
Warwick Star Bass
Squier Precision Bass TB
Last edited by consecutive e at Sep 11, 2010,
#10
Quote by consecutive e

Hope that wasn't too hard to follow



lol... i think i understand what you mean! I will have to do that in the morning... people are sleeping lol
http://www.youtube.com/user/ladiesbass

Bass: Yamaha RBX374 (4 String)
Bass: Schecter Damien-5 (5 String)
Amp: Fender Rumble 60
Future Stack: Ampeg SVT-7PRO Head, SVT-410HLF Bass Speaker Cabinet
#11
Quote by consecutive e
No, you said Drop C, not Drop C#. The # means the note is sharp, a semi-tone, or one fret, higher than the natural note.


Just messing and i knot what # means lol silly
http://www.youtube.com/user/ladiesbass

Bass: Yamaha RBX374 (4 String)
Bass: Schecter Damien-5 (5 String)
Amp: Fender Rumble 60
Future Stack: Ampeg SVT-7PRO Head, SVT-410HLF Bass Speaker Cabinet
#12
Use the edit button instead of posting twice
also, how are we supposed to know that you're joking?

You should probably learn how to tune by ear instead of tuning every string with the tuner, it is a life long skill. Basically you get one note spot on with the tuner and then tune everything else around it.

It's easy as cake from there!

E A D G are typically your standard strings
the notes go A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#, A

not too tough, right?

So if you want to do CGCF then all you have to do is tune one string and then do the rest by playing the same notes on the strings and making them collide in unison. In standard tuning, the strings are five 'notes' apart (a fourth, in musical terms). With drop tuning, the bottom string is seven 'notes' lower instead of five (a fifth).

Even using a crappy EADGBe tuner, you just have to tune your second string to G and then you can do the rest by ear. But what if you wanted to do Drop C# instead? Either tune to Drop D or Drop C and then adjust all of the strings by one fret. I'd suggest using the tuner for the highest string and then tuning down because to my ears, the mistakes are more apparent in higher frequencies than in lower ones.
Lord Gold feeds from your orifices and he wants to see you sweat.
Lord Gold probes you publicly and makes your pussy wet.
Now say his name.....
#13
Quote by lordofthefood1

Even using a crappy EADGBe tuner, you just have to tune your second string to G and then you can do the rest by ear. But what if you wanted to do Drop C# instead? Either tune to Drop D or Drop C and then adjust all of the strings by one fret. I'd suggest using the tuner for the highest string and then tuning down because to my ears, the mistakes are more apparent in higher frequencies than in lower ones.

Disagreed. Well, sort of.

In my experience in a wind band and years of musical theory and what not, i've learned that you always tune to the bottom, like the pyramid of sound. In the case of drop C, always tune the F to the C, the C with the G, and the G with the bottom C and interconnect them. As long as you've got the lowest C down, you should be find tuning the rest.

Although I know it can be a bit more difficult hearing the clashing sound waves at the lower freq
pinga
#14
Quote by Cb4rabid
Disagreed. Well, sort of.

In my experience in a wind band and years of musical theory and what not, i've learned that you always tune to the bottom, like the pyramid of sound. In the case of drop C, always tune the F to the C, the C with the G, and the G with the bottom C and interconnect them. As long as you've got the lowest C down, you should be find tuning the rest.

Although I know it can be a bit more difficult hearing the clashing sound waves at the lower freq

Makes sense with that many instruments. Doesn't the low bassoon tune first? I don't even know how to tune wind instruments and now I'm curious if the individual instruments tune down to up too.
Lord Gold feeds from your orifices and he wants to see you sweat.
Lord Gold probes you publicly and makes your pussy wet.
Now say his name.....
Last edited by lordofthefood1 at Sep 11, 2010,
#15
Quote by lordofthefood1
Makes sense with that many instruments. Doesn't the low bassoon tune first? I don't even know how to tune wind instruments and now I'm curious if the individual instruments tune down to up too.

Nope, the oboe tunes first because its tone is more stable, and then the tubas tune accordingly. After that, everybody tunes to the tubas according to their range (tubas->euphonium->trombone->etc).

You tune depending on the instrument. Brass instruments use tuning slides that you pull out if you're sharp, push in if you're sharp. Wind instruments generally push/pull out something too but it all depends.

But it all goes from the lowest to the high.
pinga